The GO TO Strategies: Scaffolding Options for Teachers of ELLs-TESOL 2014
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The GO TO Strategies: Scaffolding Options for Teachers of ELLs-TESOL 2014

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The GO TO Strategies: Scaffolding Options for Teachers of ELLs-TESOL 2014 The GO TO Strategies: Scaffolding Options for Teachers of ELLs-TESOL 2014 Presentation Transcript

  • Linda  New  Levine,  Ph.D                                  Laura  Lukens                                                                              Be5y  Ansin  Smallwood,  Ph.  D.   EFL/ESL  Consultant                                                ELL  Program  Coordinator                                    Founder  and  President   Vero  Beach,  FL                                                                North  Kansas  City  Schools                                  Succeeding  with  ELLS  (SWELL)                                                  Kansas  City,  MO          Bethesda,  MD                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      The  GO  TO  Strategies                    2014  TESOL  Interna1onal  Conven1on,  K-­‐12  Dream  Day                            Portland,  Oregon                            March  26,  3:00-­‐4:15PM             The  GO  TO  Strategies:   Scaffolding  Op1ons  for   Teachers  of  ELLs
  •      Agenda  Review     1.  Ge&ng  Started:  Overview  and  Community                      Building     2.  Introducing  the  GO  TO  Strategies     3.  AssociaBng  Research-­‐based  Principles  with  PracBce  and   Strategies       4.  Becoming  Familiar  with  the  GO  TO  Strategies:                      Inventory       6.  IntegraBng  Strategies  into  InstrucBon     7.  Summary  and  Conclusion   The GO TO Strategies
  • Introduc1on  and  Community  Building   Things  in  Common     •  In  your  table  groups,  find  one  thing  you  all   have  in  common.     •  Don’t  go  for  the  obvious!   •  Choose  someone  to  report  your  group’s   finding    
  • Things  in  Common   Useful  for:   •  CreaBng  community  among  a  group  of  diverse   students   •  Enabling  students  to  learn  about  each  other   •  Establishing  connecBons  among  members  of  a   group   •  Showing  students  that  all  are  valued  for  their   unique  differences  and  their  commonaliBes     Community  Building  Strategy,  Inventory,  P.  4  
  • Structured  Note-­‐Taking   Useful  for:   •  Enabling  students  to  organize  informaBon   •  Providing  a  focus  for  listening   •  Organizing  informaBon  and  concepts  for   future  study   •  Teaching  a  learning  strategy     Student  Learning  Strategy,  Inventory,  P.  21    
  • The  GO  TO  Strategies  Project   •  Outgrowth  of  Project  EXCELL-­‐NKCS/UMKC     •  Based  on  CAL’s  Five  Principles          of  Sheltered  InstrucBon     •  Scaffolds  rigorous  instrucBon  for  ELLs  as  states   transiBon  to  the  CCSS                                                                                                                                                        h5p://www.cal.org/projects/pdfs/go-­‐to-­‐strategies.pdf       Project EXCELL
  • The  GO  TO  Strategies  Project   •  A  “suite”  of  products  for  use  in  content  or  ELL            classrooms:   –  Introduc<on  to  the  Strategies  Project   –  Strategic  Teaching  and  Learning  Guided  by  the  Five  Principles  of   Instruc<on  for  ELLs   –  Strategies  “Matrix”   –  Strategies  Inventory   –  Strategies  Glossary   •  Our  goal  for  today:   –  To  introduce  and  provide  hands-­‐on  experience  with  newly  developed   strategies  resources  (2013)  that  enable  teachers  to  plan  scaffolded,  yet   rigorous  content  lessons  for  English  language  learners.                                                                                                                                                           The GO TO Strategies
  •   The  GO  TO  Strategies  Matrix     •  The WIDA CAN DO Descriptors describe what a student “can do”, with support, at a given level of English proficiency in each domain •  Wouldn’t it be nice if we had a similar matrix to show strategies that would be appropriate for students at the different levels of language proficiency in each domain?
  •      Scavenger  Hunt   Purpose:    To  gain  a  hands-­‐on  familiarity  with  these  resources       DirecQons:    Work  with  a  partner  to  find  the  answers  to  these    ques<ons.       1.  How  is  “instrucBonal  strategy”  defined?  On  what  page  do  you  find  that?           2.  What  is  Principle  1  and  an  example  of  a  primary  strategy  that  reflects  it?  On  what  page  do  you  find   that?       3.  In  what  secBon  (and  page/s)  do  you  find  strategies  scaffolded  across  proficiency  levels?                        What  is  the  strategy  example  given  for  Speaking,  at  Level  2?         4.  What  are  two  kinds  of  informaBon  given  about  each  strategy  in  the  Inventory?       5.            Find  the  “Wait  Time  Two”  strategy  in  the  Inventory  and  Glossary  secBons.  Page  numbers?                                When  might  you  use  each  secBon?       6.  Do  you  need  permission  to  copy  part  or  all  of  the  GO  TO  Strategies?  On  what  page  do  you  find  that                      informaBon?   The GO TO Strategies
  • Strategic  Teaching  and  Learning  Using   the      Principles   •  Principle  1.  Focus  on  academic  language,  literacy,  and   vocabulary.     •  Principle  2.    Link  background  knowledge  and  culture  to   learning.   •  Principle  3.  Increase  comprehensible  input  and  language   output.     •  Principle  4.  Promote  classroom  interac1on.     •  Principle  5.  S1mulate  higher  order  thinking  and  the  use  of   learning  strategies.  
  • Principles  of  Instruc1on  for  English  Language   Learners:  Think-­‐Write-­‐Pair-­‐Share   •  Which  of  these  principles  is  most  important     for  you  to  focus  on  with  your  students?  Why   did  you  choose  this  principle?   •  THINK  of  the  most  important  principle  for   your  students  and  why  you  chose  this   principle.     •  WRITE  your  responses  on  a  sheet  of  paper.   •  PAIR  with  another  parBcipant  to  share  your   ideas.   •  DISCUSS  your  ideas  with  the  group.    
  • Think-­‐Write-­‐Pair-­‐Share   Useful  for:   •  Students  who  need  Bme  to  reflect  before   responding   •  Students  who  need  Bme  to  structure  a   grammaBcal  uierance   •  Students  who  never  raise  their  hands  in  class   •  Students  who  can  benefit  from  a      Key  Sentence  Frame   Interactive Strategies, Inventory, P. 12
  • Strategic  Teaching  and  Learning  Using  the  Five   Principles   •  This  document  aligns  examples  of  strategies   with  each  of  the  five  principles.   •  Please  locate  the  principle  that  you  chose  as   most  important  for  your  students.   •  Glance  through  some  of  the  strategies  aligned   with  this  principle.   •  Highlight  three  strategies  you  feel            would  be  useful  for  your  students.  
  •    Inventory  of  GO  TO  Strategies  for   English  Language  Learners,  K-­‐12     •  Look  at  the  Table  of  Contents  in  the  Inventory.   •  Put  a  check  √  next  to  any  strategy  that  you   know  or  think  that  you  know.                                                (Self-­‐Assessment  Scale)   •  Share  your  list  with  your  learning  partner.  
  • Self-­‐Assessment  Scales   Useful  for     •  Vocabulary  teaching  and  learning   •  Oral  language  comprehension  assessment   •  Oral  language  speaking  assessment   •  Reading  comprehension  assessment   Vocabulary Teaching Strategies, P. 24
  • An1cipa1on  Guide:   Strategy  Categories  and  Defini1ons   Agree Disagree _____ _____ 1. Interactive strategies promote academic oral language development in the classroom _____ _____ 2. Reading strategies help promote comprehension of a reading or content text. _____ _____ 3. Student Learning strategies are practiced by students to promote comprehension of content text, comprehension of oral language input, and language learning study skills. _____ _____ 4. Writing strategies help develop connections between and among students within the classroom and within small groups of students.
  • Strategy  Categories:     What  is  the  Purpose  of  Each  Category?   •  Community  Building  Strategies   •  Interac1ve  Strategies   •  Teaching  Strategies   •  Student  Learning  Strategies   •  Vocabulary  Teaching  Strategies   •   Reading  Strategies   •  Wri1ng  Strategies  
  • Strategy  Categories  and  Defini1ons   Community  Building  Strategies   These  strategies  are  introduced  by  the  teacher   to  help  develop  connecBons  between  and   among  students  within  the  classroom  and   within  small  groups  of  students.       InteracQve  Strategies   These  strategies  are  organized  by  the  teacher   to  promote  academic  oral  language   development  in  the  classroom     Teaching  Strategies   These  strategies  are  used  by  a  teacher  to   scaffold  the  learning  process  and  promote   comprehension  of  oral  or  wriien  language  by   students.     .  
  • Strategy  Categories  and  Defini1ons   Student  Learning  Strategies   These  strategies  are  pracBced  by  students  to   promote  comprehension  of  content  text,   comprehension  of  oral  language  input,  and   language  learning  study  skills.     Vocabulary  Teaching  Strategies   These  strategies  are  introduced  by  the  teacher   into  a  learning  unit  to  help  ELLs  learn  the   academic  vocabulary  required  for  high   achievement  in  schools.     Reading  Strategies   These  strategies  are  taught  to  students  to   promote  comprehension  of  a  reading  or   content  text.     WriQng  Strategies   These  strategies  are  taught  by  the  teacher  to   enable  ELLs  to  develop  academic  wriBng   competency  within  the  content  classroom  
  • Reac1on  Guide:   Strategy  Categories  and  Defini1ons   Agree Disagree _____ _____ 1. Interactive strategies promote academic oral language development in the classroom _____ _____ 2. Reading strategies promote comprehension of a reading or content text. _____ _____ 3. Student Learning strategies are practiced by students to promote comprehension of content text, comprehension of oral language input, and language learning study skills. _____ _____ 4. Writing strategies help develop connections between and among students within the classroom and within small groups of students.
  • An1cipa1on/Reac1on  Guides   Useful  for:   •  AcBvaBng  students’  background  or      prior  knowledge   •  Introducing  necessary  vocabulary  and   grammar  forms   •  Providing  informaBon  about  future  instrucBon   •  AlerBng  students  to  what  they  know  and  what   they  don’t  know   Reading Strategy, Inventory, P. 16
  • Strategy  Categories:   What  is  the  purpose  of  each?   •  DemonstraBon-­‐Mix  and  Match     •  Selected  parBcipants  will  first  mix,  and  then,  aler   signal,  find  a  match  for  their  cards  –a  definiBon  of  a   category  to  the  name  of  the  category.      
  • Mix  and  Match   Useful  for:   •  Matching  vocabulary  with  definiBons   •  Matching  math  equivalents  (9  x  3;  27)   •  Matching  examples  of  categories  (e.g.,  repBle/ snake,  mammal/dolphin,  states/capitols,   biomes/flora  and  fauna)   Vocabulary Teaching Strategies, Inventory, P. 23
  • The  GO  TO  Strategies:  A  Planning  Framework  for   Scaffolding  Content  Lessons     By  Incorpora1ng  Strategies  for  ELLs,  K-­‐12   Theore1cal  Founda1ons:     •  ConstrucBvist  learning  guides  the              lesson  framework.  (Bruner,  1960)     •  Learning  is  an  acBve  process  in  which              learners  construct  new  ideas  and  concepts              based  upon  the  level  of  their  current  or  past              knowledge.    
  • The  GO  TO  Strategies:  A  Planning  Framework  for   Scaffolding  Content  Lessons     By  Incorpora1ng  Strategies  for  ELLs,  K-­‐12   Theore1cal  Founda1ons:     • Students  engage  in  concrete  experiences              in  which  they  discover  principles  by  themselves.     • The  teacher’s  role  is  to  engage  students  in                acBve  dialogs  and  translate  new  informaBon                into  a  format  appropriate  to  the  learner’s                current  state  of  understanding.  
  • The  GO  TO  Strategies:  A  Planning  Framework  for   Scaffolding  Content  Lessons     By  Incorpora1ng  Strategies  for  ELLs,  K-­‐12   Theore1cal  Founda1ons:     •  Learning  is  scaffolded  so  that  it  can  be   readily  grasped  by  the  learner  (Wood,   Bruner,  &  Ross,  1976).   •  Sequence  of  learning  proceeds  from   concrete  to  abstract.   •  The  gradual-­‐release-­‐of-­‐responsibility   model  (Brown  &  Abell,  2007;  Campione  &   Day,  1981;  Fitzgerald  &  Graves,  2004;   Levine  &  McCloskey,  2013)  is  parBcularly   useful  for  ELLs  
  • The  GO  TO  Strategies:  A  Planning  Framework  for   Scaffolding  Content  Lessons     By  Incorpora1ng  Strategies  for  ELLs,  K-­‐12   KEY  to  Strategies:     •  IS  =  InteracBve  Strategy   •  TS  =  Teaching  Strategy   •  CBS  =  Community  Building  Strategy   •  SLS  =  Student  Learning  Strategy   •  VTS  =  Vocabulary  Teaching  Strategy   •  RS  =  Reading  Strategy   •  WS  =  WriBng  Strategy  
  • Lesson  Sequence   Star1ng  Instruc1on  –  Explora1on  Phase     • Ac1vate  prior  knowledge,  learning,  or  understanding   –  SBr  the  Class  (IS)   –  Roving  Charts  (IS)   –  K-­‐W-­‐L  (TS)     • Engage  in  concrete  explora1on  or  observa1on   –  Graphic  Organizer    (TS)   –  Four  Corners    (IS)     • Pre-­‐reading  ac1vi1es   –  AnBcipaBon  Guides    (RS)   –  Language  Experience  Approach    (RS)   –  Teach  the  Text  Backwards  (RS)  
  • Lesson  Sequence   Building  Instruc1on  –  Concept  Development     • Teach  academic  and  technical  vocabulary   –  Closed  Sort  Tasks    (VTS)   –  Cognates    (VTS)   –  Key  Sentence  Frames    (VTS)     • Students  interact  orally  with  others  to  develop  concepts   –  10  –  2    (IS)   –  Numbered  Heads  Together    (IS)   –  Round  the  Clock  Learning  Partners  (IS)     • Engage  in  close  reading   –  Guided  Reading    (RS)   –  Directed  Reading  Thinking  AcBvity  (DRTA)    (RS)   –  Reciprocal  Teaching    (RS)   • Assemble  or  organize  data   –  Concept/Idea  Maps    (SLS)   –  Structured  Note-­‐taking    (SLS)   –  T  Charts    (SLS)  
  • Lesson  Sequence   Building  Instruc1on  –  Applica1on     • Students  con1nue  to  work  concretely  using  new  vocabulary   –  Dialogue  Journals    (WS)   –  Content  Learning  Logs    (WS)   –  Reader’s  Theatre    (TS)     • Students  use  concepts  in  a  new  or  more              complex  way   –  Text  to  Graphics  and  Back  Again    (WS)     • Report  and  write   –  CollaboraBve  Dialogues    (TS)   –  Report  Frames    (WS)  
  • Lesson  Sequence   Concluding  Instruc1on  –  Assessment       – Rubrics    (TS)   – Comprehension  Checking    (TS)   – CollaboraBve  Dialogues    (TS).      
  • Now  It’s  Your  Turn!!     Give  One  -­‐  Get  One   •  Pair  with  a  learning  partner  and  locate  your  lesson  framework   matrix.   •  Think  of  a  student  you  work  with–  either  elementary  or  middle   school   •  Choose  a  GO  TO  Strategy  from  an  appropriate  category  for  each  of   the  four  parts  of  the  lesson  framework.   •  Write  the  four  strategies  on  your  framework  worksheet.   •  Give  your  worksheet  to  your  partner  and  get  your  partner’s   worksheet  in  return.   •  Write  your  strategy  examples  on  your  partner’s  worksheet.  Your   partner  will  write  examples  on  your  worksheet.     Give  One  -­‐  Get  One,  Inventory,  p.  32  
  • Give  One  –  Get  One   Useful  for:   •  Engaging  students  in  oral  language  exchanges   using  academic  vocabulary  or  structures     •  Scaffolding  a  learning  task  with  learning   partners   •  AcBvaBng  informaBon  or  summarizing   informaBon  in  a  learning  unit   •  Involving  100%  of  students  in  the  instrucBonal   conversaBon   •  Providing  movement  (ideal)  
  • Summary:  S1r  the  Class   •  Take  your  GO  TO  Strategies  with  you  when   the  facilitator  asks  you  to  stand  and  walk   around  the  room.   •  Stop  moving  when  you  hear  the  word   “Freeze!”   •  Listen  to  the  quesBon  and  group  yourselves   by  the  number  of  the  answer.   •  Listen  for  a  summarizing  quesBon  and   respond  in  your  small  group.   •  Be  ready  to  walk  again.  
  • S1r  the  Class   Useful  for:   •  Students  who  need  movement   •  Students  who  can  learn  summarizing  concepts   by  listening  to  others   •  Students  who  need  opportuniBes  for   academic  language  interacBon   •  Students  who  can  respond  orally  when   scaffolded  with  notes   •  Students  who  never  raise  their  hand  in  class   Interactive Strategies, Inventory, P. 11
  • The  GO  TO  Strategies     2014  TESOL  Interna1onal  Conven1on   K-­‐12  Dream  Day   March  26,  2014     Thank  you!   Laura Lukens ELL Program Coordinator North Kansas City Schools, MO llukens@nkcschools.org (816)413-5115 Linda New Levine EFL/ESL Consultant LNEWLEVINE@aol.com (772)231-6661 Betty Ansin Smallwood, Ph.D. Founder and President Succeeding with ELLs (SWELL) SucceedingWithELLs@gmail.com (240)498-0378