Cracking the QR Code

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Presentation from SAA 2011 as part of the "Archives on the Go: Using Mobile Technologies for Your Collections" session.

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  • Thank you for the comment! I intended to add one to my badge at SAA but forgot to print it before I left. Next year! Glad you're finding ways to use QR codes. :)
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  • Nice presentation and some good ideas! I put a QR codes on business card that I made that link to my LinkedIn profile and one that links to the homepage of our special collections. I slipped one into my badge pouch too when I went to MARAC. No one scanned me (mainly because they did not have a smart phone), but it was a great conversation starter! If I had gone to SAA this year I would have used it there too. We use them on our weekly event postings in the library. Students can scan the QR code to find additional information or register for classes offered by the library.
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  • QR stands for “quick response.” These codes were invented in 1994 by Denso Wave, a division of Toyota, as a means to store more information than a regular barcode.
  • A QR code is kind of like a traditional barcode that you see every day,
  • But it can do so much more!
  • According to comScore, a digital marketing consulting firm, in June 2011, 14 million Americans scanned QR codes. Most of the users were from 18-44 and scanned codes at home or at retail stores.
  • This code on a Kohl’s ad immediately takes the user to their online store.
  • Retail outlets – Code at Best Buy links to product description and review. If online price is lower (updated more quickly), they will match it.
  • Museums are using them to provide additional information about exhibits.
  • Airports – these codes link to free books, crossword puzzles, or Sudoku games.
  • Library catalogs – link to call number info and/or a map of the stacks
  • Even on TV! The Weather Channel’s code shown here downloads their app to your smartphone. You can scan a code from a computer monitor or TV screen just like you can on paper.
  • I hope your wheels are spinning as you think of ways you can use QR codes in your archives.
  • One of the most obvious uses is to link to a web site. The code pictured here links to my About dot Me page, where you can connect with me on social networks.
  • The QR code on the left was part of a display I created for Homecoming at my university. Scanning it leads you to the Homecoming events website pictured on the right.
  • Another way to use QR codes is to create Vcards, or virtual business cards. The code shown here links to my contact information.
  • Options on the buttons at the bottom are to add my contact information to your phone, show a map of the street address, call me, or send me an email. All of those are enabled when you scan the code.
  • URL? Text? Phone number? Different code generators offer different options.
  • I hope I’ve shown you how easy QR codes are to use and inspired you to give them a try!
  • Cracking the QR Code

    1. 1. Cracking the QR Code Laura M. Botts, C.A. Society of American Archivists August 26, 2011
    2. 2. What is this thing?
    3. 3. Think of it like a barcode…
    4. 4. … only better! http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com
    5. 5. Traditional “1-D” Barcode <ul><li>Must be scanned from left to right by a laser. </li></ul><ul><li>Sources: www.veritecinc.com and www.mobile-barcodes.com </li></ul>
    6. 6. Traditional “1-D” Barcode <ul><li>Must be scanned from left to right by a laser. </li></ul><ul><li>Holds limited data, up to 20 digits. </li></ul><ul><li>Sources: www.veritecinc.com and www.mobile-barcodes.com </li></ul>
    7. 7. Traditional “1-D” Barcode <ul><li>Must be scanned from left to right by a laser. </li></ul><ul><li>Holds limited data, up to 20 digits. </li></ul><ul><li>A missing bar can give a false result, but the user won’t know. </li></ul><ul><li>Sources: www.veritecinc.com and www.mobile-barcodes.com </li></ul>
    8. 8. Traditional “1-D” Barcode <ul><li>Must be scanned from left to right by a laser. </li></ul><ul><li>Holds limited data, up to 20 digits. </li></ul><ul><li>A missing bar can give a false result, but the user won’t know. </li></ul><ul><li>Not recommended for use on a shiny surface because of laser reflection. </li></ul><ul><li>Sources: www.veritecinc.com and www.mobile-barcodes.com </li></ul>
    9. 9. Expanded “2-D” Barcode <ul><li>Can be scanned at any angle by a CCD (charge-coupled device) camera like those in smartphones. </li></ul><ul><li>Sources: www.veritecinc.com and www.mobile-barcodes.com </li></ul>
    10. 10. Expanded “2-D” Barcode <ul><li>Can be scanned at any angle by a CCD (charge-coupled device) camera like those in smartphones. </li></ul><ul><li>Can hold 100 times more data than standard barcode, up to 7,089 digits. </li></ul><ul><li>Sources: www.veritecinc.com and www.mobile-barcodes.com </li></ul>
    11. 11. Expanded “2-D” Barcode <ul><li>Can be scanned at any angle by a CCD (charge-coupled device) camera like those in smartphones. </li></ul><ul><li>Can hold 100 times more data than standard barcode, up to 7,089 digits. </li></ul><ul><li>Can be read accurately with up to 25% damage to code and lets the user know about failure to read. </li></ul><ul><li>Sources: www.veritecinc.com and www.mobile-barcodes.com </li></ul>
    12. 12. Expanded “2-D” Barcode <ul><li>Can be scanned at any angle by a CCD (charge-coupled device) camera like those in smartphones. </li></ul><ul><li>Can hold 100 times more data than standard barcode, up to 7,089 digits. </li></ul><ul><li>Can be read accurately with up to 25% damage to code and lets the user know about failure to read. </li></ul><ul><li>Can be used on shiny surfaces since reading is performed by camera, not laser. </li></ul><ul><li>Sources: www.veritecinc.com and www.mobile-barcodes.com </li></ul>
    13. 13. Who’s Using Them?
    14. 14. Millions of Americans! http://mediaplusme.wordpress.com
    15. 15. Where can I find them? advertisements
    16. 16. Where can I find them? retail outlets Image: http://retailgeek.com
    17. 17. Where can I find them? museum exhibits Image: http://blog.childrensmuseum.org
    18. 18. Where can I find them? museum exhibits
    19. 19. Where can I find them? airports Image: http://www.chrisrawlinson.com
    20. 20. Where can I find them? library catalogs
    21. 21. Where can I find them? television Image: http://nydigitallab.ogilvy.com
    22. 22. But I’m an archivist. What good are they to me? http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com
    23. 23. web site link <ul><li>The code below… </li></ul><ul><li>… links to this site. </li></ul>http://about.me/laurabotts
    24. 24. link a display to more information
    25. 25. Vcard virtual business card
    26. 26. Add contact / Show map / Dial number / Send email
    27. 27. Other Ideas for QR Codes <ul><li>Link an event web site to a postcard – no need to reprint cards if the schedule changes, just update the site! </li></ul>
    28. 28. Other Ideas for QR Codes <ul><li>Add them to student handouts, linking to contact information, services, hours, inter- library loan, etc. </li></ul>
    29. 29. Other Ideas for QR Codes <ul><li>Put them on library shelves containing related collections as a way to entice patrons to the archives. </li></ul>
    30. 30. Other Ideas for QR Codes <ul><li>Add in-depth information to displays; link to finding aids or biographical info. </li></ul>
    31. 31. Other Ideas for QR Codes <ul><li>Include a map to your institution on a brochure. Sites such as Google Maps allow patrons to enter their addresses for driving directions. </li></ul>
    32. 32. Other Ideas for QR Codes <ul><li>Provide a link to a survey on visitor satisfaction. </li></ul>
    33. 33. Other Ideas for QR Codes <ul><li>Add a tutorial video to your microfilm reader or photocopier. </li></ul>
    34. 34. How do I create one? <ul><li>Search online for “QR code generator.” </li></ul>QR code generator
    35. 35. How do I create one? <ul><li>Select your site, then choose the type of object you want to create. </li></ul>
    36. 36. How do I create one? <ul><li>Enter the information, and save the code. </li></ul>
    37. 37. Some generators allow custom colors, shading, etc. = =
    38. 38. How do users read them? <ul><li>All they need is a smartphone or tablet with a camera and a barcode scanner app. </li></ul>
    39. 39. How do users read them? <ul><li>Free apps are available for download, and some phones have them pre-installed. </li></ul>
    40. 40. How do users read them? <ul><li>Add context to let the user know what will happen when they scan. </li></ul>Scan here to visit my web site!
    41. 41. Go forth and code!
    42. 42. Sources <ul><li>comScore, Inc. press release: http://goo.gl/EhBaj </li></ul><ul><li>Pew Internet survey on smartphones: http://goo.gl/ZD5Fj </li></ul><ul><li>Aaron Tay’s blog post on QR codes: http://goo.gl/aR7EX </li></ul><ul><li>Veritec Code Comparison: http://goo.gl/nq2hU </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile Barcodes information: http://goo.gl/dgFuf </li></ul><ul><li>List of code generators: http://goo.gl/vN9bi </li></ul><ul><li>My blog post on QR codes: http://goo.gl/ITrhC </li></ul><ul><li>Hyperbole and a Half: http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com </li></ul>

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