The Road to the Constitution<br />By: Laura Birge<br />Ewen and Donable, Winding Road, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attributi...
Reasons for the Articles of Confederation<br />Written during the Revolutionary War<br />Written by The Continental Congre...
Problems with the Articles of Confederation<br /> Weak government<br />Purposefully <br /> Could notenforce laws<br />Stev...
Money Problems<br />Could not collect taxes<br />Can’t raise money<br /> All States had own currency<br />Bankrupt in 1786...
Protection Problems<br /> Weak military<br />No navy<br />Lacks support<br /> States had local militias<br />Kelly, Martin...
 Trade Problems<br /> States taxed other states goods<br /> Bad feelings between north and south<br /> Decline in trade<br...
The Call for a Convention<br /> Revise the Articles of Confederation<br /> Make the government stronger<br />Kelly, Martin...
Where and When? <br /> Held in Philadelphia<br />Nations capital	<br />Independence Hall<br /> Convention started on May 2...
Who was there?<br /> 12 of 13 states attended<br /> Rhode Island did not come<br /> 70 invited- 55 attended<br />Ages 26-8...
Leaders of the convention<br />George Washington<br />From Virginia<br />President of convention<br />Commander of Contine...
James Madison<br /> From Virginia<br /> Father of the Constitution<br /> Federalist Papers<br /> Benjamin Franklin<br /> F...
The Decision for a New Constitution<br /> Articles had many things wrong with it<br /> Could not be fixed<br /> Some state...
Disagreements over the Constitution <br /> How it was set up<br />representation<br /> Small states vs. big states<br />Ro...
Which Were Which?<br />Big States<br />Small States<br />Virginia<br />Pennsylvania<br />North Carolina<br />Massachutes <...
Virginia Plan<br /> Proposed by Edmund Randolph<br /> House elected by the people<br />Senate elected by state legislature...
New Jersey Plan<br />Proposed by William Paterson<br />One house<br />Every state had same representation<br />Mount, Stev...
The Great Compromise<br />Also know as the Connecticut Compromise<br />House of Representatives elected by people<br />Bas...
3/5 Compromise<br />3 of 5 slaves counted for population<br />Representation<br />Taxes<br />South wanted them to be 1<br ...
What did we Learn?<br />Articles of Confederation were weak <br />Constitutional Convention is called<br />Constitution wr...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

The Road to the Constitution

464

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
464
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "The Road to the Constitution"

  1. 1. The Road to the Constitution<br />By: Laura Birge<br />Ewen and Donable, Winding Road, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution<br />
  2. 2. Reasons for the Articles of Confederation<br />Written during the Revolutionary War<br />Written by The Continental Congress<br />Ratified March 1, 1781<br />Sense of a unified government<br />Bring states together<br />“The Articles of Confederation.” www.congressforkids.net. The Dirksen Congressional Center, 2008. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.<br /> <br />Cliff 1066, Betsy Ross Flag, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution<br />
  3. 3. Problems with the Articles of Confederation<br /> Weak government<br />Purposefully <br /> Could notenforce laws<br />Steve Cherrier, Flying Eagle 2, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution, No Derivative Works<br />“The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union.” www.earlyamerica.com. Archiving Early America, n.d. Web. 25 Feb. 2011.<br />
  4. 4. Money Problems<br />Could not collect taxes<br />Can’t raise money<br /> All States had own currency<br />Bankrupt in 1786<br /> State money = other state money?<br />“The Making of the Constitution.” www.socialstudiesforkids.com. Social Studies for Kida, n.d. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.<br />Alancleaver_2000, Piggy Bank, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution<br />
  5. 5. Protection Problems<br /> Weak military<br />No navy<br />Lacks support<br /> States had local militias<br />Kelly, Martin. “Why did the Articles of Confederation Fail?” americanhistory.about.com. About.com, n.d. Web.25 Feb.2011<br />Sean Hackbarth, Revolutionary War Reenactors, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution<br />
  6. 6. Trade Problems<br /> States taxed other states goods<br /> Bad feelings between north and south<br /> Decline in trade<br /> Little respect from other nations<br />Linder, Doug. “The Constitutional Convention of 1787.” Law2.umkc.edu. The University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law, 2011. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.<br />Jessica Burmann, DSC7319, 2/27/22, Attribution and Non Commercial <br />
  7. 7. The Call for a Convention<br /> Revise the Articles of Confederation<br /> Make the government stronger<br />Kelly, Martin. “Why did the Articles of Confederation Fail?” americanhistory.about.com. About.com, n.d. Web.25 Feb.2011<br />Wallyg, Philidelphia- Independence Hall, 2/27/11, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs<br />
  8. 8. Where and When? <br /> Held in Philadelphia<br />Nations capital <br />Independence Hall<br /> Convention started on May 25, 1787<br />Constitution signed September 17, 1787<br /> Ratified June 21, 1788<br />Mount, Steve. “The Convention Timeline.” www.usconstitution.net. U.S. Constitution Online, 2010. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.<br />Digitonin, Independence Hall, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution and No Derivative Works <br />
  9. 9. Who was there?<br /> 12 of 13 states attended<br /> Rhode Island did not come<br /> 70 invited- 55 attended<br />Ages 26-81<br />All men<br />Met in secret <br />Linder, Doug. “The Constitutional Convention of 1787.” Law2.umkc.edu. The University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law, 2011. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.<br />Kurt Magoon, Independence Hall,2/27/11, Attribution-ShareAlike<br />
  10. 10. Leaders of the convention<br />George Washington<br />From Virginia<br />President of convention<br />Commander of Continental Army<br /> 1st President<br /> Alexander Hamilton<br />From New York<br />Active in the ratification of Constitution<br />Secretary of Treasury<br />Cliff1066, George Washington, First President, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution<br />Marion Doss, Alexander Hamilton, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution, Share Alike<br />“The Founding Fathers: Delegates to the Constitutional Convention.” www.archives.gov. National Archives, n.d. Web. 25 Feb. 2011.<br />
  11. 11. James Madison<br /> From Virginia<br /> Father of the Constitution<br /> Federalist Papers<br /> Benjamin Franklin<br /> From Pennsylvania<br /> Oldest member<br /> Very respected<br />U.S. Department of State, James Madison, 2/27/11, United States Government Work<br />MCS@flickr, Benjamin Franklin, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution and No Derivative Works<br />“The Founding Fathers: Delegates to the Constitutional Convention.” www.archives.gov. National Archives, n.d. Web. 25 Feb. 2011.<br />
  12. 12. The Decision for a New Constitution<br /> Articles had many things wrong with it<br /> Could not be fixed<br /> Some states would not have attended<br />Mount, Steve. “The Constutional Topic: The Annapolis Conference.” www.usconstitution.net. U.S. Constitution Online, 2010. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.<br /> <br />Diablodale, Liberty Bell, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution and No Derivative Works<br />
  13. 13. Disagreements over the Constitution <br /> How it was set up<br />representation<br /> Small states vs. big states<br />Rosie O’Beirne, Stock Photo of the Consitution of the United States and Feather Quill, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution and No Derivative Works<br />Linder, Doug. “The Constitutional Convention of 1787.” Law2.umkc.edu. The University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law, 2011. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.<br />
  14. 14. Which Were Which?<br />Big States<br />Small States<br />Virginia<br />Pennsylvania<br />North Carolina<br />Massachutes <br />Maryland<br />New York<br />South Carolina<br />New Jersey<br />New Hampshire<br />Georgia<br />Rhode Island<br />Delaware<br />Connecticut<br />Merrill, Deane. “Estimated Population of American Colonies 1630-1780: Source Bureau of Census.” merrill.oln.net, n.p, 1998. Web. 25 Feb. 2011.<br /> <br />
  15. 15. Virginia Plan<br /> Proposed by Edmund Randolph<br /> House elected by the people<br />Senate elected by state legislatures<br />Both represented proportionally<br />Mount, Steve. “Constitutional Topic: Madison and the Virginia Plan.” www.usconstitution.net. U.S. Constitution Online, 2010. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.<br />Peter Fitzgerald, State Capital building, 2/27/11, Attribution-ShareAlike<br />
  16. 16. New Jersey Plan<br />Proposed by William Paterson<br />One house<br />Every state had same representation<br />Mount, Steve. “Constitutional Topic: Paterson and the New Jersey Plan.” www.usconstitution.net. U.S. Constitution Online, 2010. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.<br /> <br /> <br />Jimmywayne, New Jersey State Capital, 2/27/11, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs<br />
  17. 17. The Great Compromise<br />Also know as the Connecticut Compromise<br />House of Representatives elected by people<br />Based on population<br /> Senate is elected by state legislatures <br />2 from each state<br />Longley, Robert. “The Great Compromise of 1787: A Congress Created.” Usgovinfo.about.com. About.com. n.d. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.<br />“Direct Election of Senators.” www.senate.gov. United States Senate, n.d. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.<br />Diabblodale, Continental Congress, 2/27,11, No Creative Commons Attribution and No Derivative Works<br />
  18. 18. 3/5 Compromise<br />3 of 5 slaves counted for population<br />Representation<br />Taxes<br />South wanted them to be 1<br /> Same as the Articles of Confederation<br />Okinawa Soba, SLAVES, EX-SLAVES, and CHILDREN OF SLAVES IN THE AMERICAN SOUTH, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution, Share Alike<br />Mount, Steve. “Constitutional Topic: The Problem of Slavery.” www.usconstitution.net. U.S. Constitution Online, 2010. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.<br />
  19. 19. What did we Learn?<br />Articles of Confederation were weak <br />Constitutional Convention is called<br />Constitution written<br /> Arguments over representation and slaves<br />The Great Compromise and 3/5 Compromise<br />“The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union.” www.earlyamerica.com. Archiving Early America, n.d. Web. 25 Feb. 2011.<br />Kelly, Martin. “Why did the Articles of Confederation Fail?” americanhistory.about.com. About.com, n.d. Web.25 Feb.2011<br />Mount, Steve. “Constitutional Topic: Madison and the Virginia Plan.” www.usconstitution.net. U.S. Constitution Online, 2010. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.<br />Jcoleman, American Flag, 2/27/11, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs<br />
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×