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The Road to the Constitution

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  • 1. The Road to the Constitution
    By: Laura Birge
    Ewen and Donable, Winding Road, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution
  • 2. Reasons for the Articles of Confederation
    Written during the Revolutionary War
    Written by The Continental Congress
    Ratified March 1, 1781
    Sense of a unified government
    Bring states together
    “The Articles of Confederation.” www.congressforkids.net. The Dirksen Congressional Center, 2008. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.
     
    Cliff 1066, Betsy Ross Flag, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution
  • 3. Problems with the Articles of Confederation
    Weak government
    Purposefully
    Could notenforce laws
    Steve Cherrier, Flying Eagle 2, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution, No Derivative Works
    “The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union.” www.earlyamerica.com. Archiving Early America, n.d. Web. 25 Feb. 2011.
  • 4. Money Problems
    Could not collect taxes
    Can’t raise money
    All States had own currency
    Bankrupt in 1786
    State money = other state money?
    “The Making of the Constitution.” www.socialstudiesforkids.com. Social Studies for Kida, n.d. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.
    Alancleaver_2000, Piggy Bank, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution
  • 5. Protection Problems
    Weak military
    No navy
    Lacks support
    States had local militias
    Kelly, Martin. “Why did the Articles of Confederation Fail?” americanhistory.about.com. About.com, n.d. Web.25 Feb.2011
    Sean Hackbarth, Revolutionary War Reenactors, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution
  • 6. Trade Problems
    States taxed other states goods
    Bad feelings between north and south
    Decline in trade
    Little respect from other nations
    Linder, Doug. “The Constitutional Convention of 1787.” Law2.umkc.edu. The University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law, 2011. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.
    Jessica Burmann, DSC7319, 2/27/22, Attribution and Non Commercial
  • 7. The Call for a Convention
    Revise the Articles of Confederation
    Make the government stronger
    Kelly, Martin. “Why did the Articles of Confederation Fail?” americanhistory.about.com. About.com, n.d. Web.25 Feb.2011
    Wallyg, Philidelphia- Independence Hall, 2/27/11, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs
  • 8. Where and When?
    Held in Philadelphia
    Nations capital
    Independence Hall
    Convention started on May 25, 1787
    Constitution signed September 17, 1787
    Ratified June 21, 1788
    Mount, Steve. “The Convention Timeline.” www.usconstitution.net. U.S. Constitution Online, 2010. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.
    Digitonin, Independence Hall, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution and No Derivative Works
  • 9. Who was there?
    12 of 13 states attended
    Rhode Island did not come
    70 invited- 55 attended
    Ages 26-81
    All men
    Met in secret
    Linder, Doug. “The Constitutional Convention of 1787.” Law2.umkc.edu. The University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law, 2011. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.
    Kurt Magoon, Independence Hall,2/27/11, Attribution-ShareAlike
  • 10. Leaders of the convention
    George Washington
    From Virginia
    President of convention
    Commander of Continental Army
    1st President
    Alexander Hamilton
    From New York
    Active in the ratification of Constitution
    Secretary of Treasury
    Cliff1066, George Washington, First President, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution
    Marion Doss, Alexander Hamilton, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution, Share Alike
    “The Founding Fathers: Delegates to the Constitutional Convention.” www.archives.gov. National Archives, n.d. Web. 25 Feb. 2011.
  • 11. James Madison
    From Virginia
    Father of the Constitution
    Federalist Papers
    Benjamin Franklin
    From Pennsylvania
    Oldest member
    Very respected
    U.S. Department of State, James Madison, 2/27/11, United States Government Work
    MCS@flickr, Benjamin Franklin, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution and No Derivative Works
    “The Founding Fathers: Delegates to the Constitutional Convention.” www.archives.gov. National Archives, n.d. Web. 25 Feb. 2011.
  • 12. The Decision for a New Constitution
    Articles had many things wrong with it
    Could not be fixed
    Some states would not have attended
    Mount, Steve. “The Constutional Topic: The Annapolis Conference.” www.usconstitution.net. U.S. Constitution Online, 2010. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.
     
    Diablodale, Liberty Bell, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution and No Derivative Works
  • 13. Disagreements over the Constitution
    How it was set up
    representation
    Small states vs. big states
    Rosie O’Beirne, Stock Photo of the Consitution of the United States and Feather Quill, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution and No Derivative Works
    Linder, Doug. “The Constitutional Convention of 1787.” Law2.umkc.edu. The University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law, 2011. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.
  • 14. Which Were Which?
    Big States
    Small States
    Virginia
    Pennsylvania
    North Carolina
    Massachutes
    Maryland
    New York
    South Carolina
    New Jersey
    New Hampshire
    Georgia
    Rhode Island
    Delaware
    Connecticut
    Merrill, Deane. “Estimated Population of American Colonies 1630-1780: Source Bureau of Census.” merrill.oln.net, n.p, 1998. Web. 25 Feb. 2011.
     
  • 15. Virginia Plan
    Proposed by Edmund Randolph
    House elected by the people
    Senate elected by state legislatures
    Both represented proportionally
    Mount, Steve. “Constitutional Topic: Madison and the Virginia Plan.” www.usconstitution.net. U.S. Constitution Online, 2010. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.
    Peter Fitzgerald, State Capital building, 2/27/11, Attribution-ShareAlike
  • 16. New Jersey Plan
    Proposed by William Paterson
    One house
    Every state had same representation
    Mount, Steve. “Constitutional Topic: Paterson and the New Jersey Plan.” www.usconstitution.net. U.S. Constitution Online, 2010. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.
     
     
    Jimmywayne, New Jersey State Capital, 2/27/11, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs
  • 17. The Great Compromise
    Also know as the Connecticut Compromise
    House of Representatives elected by people
    Based on population
    Senate is elected by state legislatures
    2 from each state
    Longley, Robert. “The Great Compromise of 1787: A Congress Created.” Usgovinfo.about.com. About.com. n.d. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.
    “Direct Election of Senators.” www.senate.gov. United States Senate, n.d. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.
    Diabblodale, Continental Congress, 2/27,11, No Creative Commons Attribution and No Derivative Works
  • 18. 3/5 Compromise
    3 of 5 slaves counted for population
    Representation
    Taxes
    South wanted them to be 1
    Same as the Articles of Confederation
    Okinawa Soba, SLAVES, EX-SLAVES, and CHILDREN OF SLAVES IN THE AMERICAN SOUTH, 2/27/11, Creative Commons Attribution, Share Alike
    Mount, Steve. “Constitutional Topic: The Problem of Slavery.” www.usconstitution.net. U.S. Constitution Online, 2010. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.
  • 19. What did we Learn?
    Articles of Confederation were weak
    Constitutional Convention is called
    Constitution written
    Arguments over representation and slaves
    The Great Compromise and 3/5 Compromise
    “The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union.” www.earlyamerica.com. Archiving Early America, n.d. Web. 25 Feb. 2011.
    Kelly, Martin. “Why did the Articles of Confederation Fail?” americanhistory.about.com. About.com, n.d. Web.25 Feb.2011
    Mount, Steve. “Constitutional Topic: Madison and the Virginia Plan.” www.usconstitution.net. U.S. Constitution Online, 2010. Web. 26 Feb. 2011.
    Jcoleman, American Flag, 2/27/11, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs