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Creating your
Digital Portfolio
Marcela Reyes, MBA
Chief Branding Officer
A bit about me
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20+ years industry experience
MBA in Marketing
Adjunct Professor Marketing for T...
Have you ever…
• Attended an ATA
seminar before?
• Attended a marketing
seminar/workshop
before?
What’s a Portfolio?
It’s a collection

of

your work that can be
used to market your
language services,
apply for a job, highlight
your profes...
Why do you need a Portfolio?
To make the link
between what you can
do and what the
prospective client or
organization wants
from you.
To build

confidence
in what you
can do.
To help you

remember
what you’ve
done.
To help

you
decide
where to go
next.
To get you

attention!
To stand out from the crowd!
How do I get started
on creating an
e-portfolio?
Before your embark on
creating a portfolio,
you need to…
Identify your value proposition
• What you do?
• For whom?
• What makes you unique
Employers and clients want a strategic portfolio
which clearly demonstrates that the translator
fits the company’s culture...
How do you craft your
unique value proposition?
Extract
Yourself

Your Competitors

Your Target
Audience
My ideal

job right now is to work as a _______.
Know yourself
Focus on what you do well – be a super-hero (or heroine) within your strengths.
Personal development resourc...
Your differentiators
• What separates your from your
competition?
• What makes you unique and
different than others who pr...
What makes you different?
• Who are your competitors?
• What makes your services unique?
• What do you offer that your com...
Who is your target
audience?
• What their particular
struggles/problems they are
experiencing right now.
• How working wit...
What’s in it for them?
• What’s in it for your client
to work with you?
• It’s about conviction, not
just the results
• Wh...
―If you work with me‖
exercise
If you work with me, you’re going to
get: ______________________________.
Put it all together

Vision

Differentiators

Purpose
Strengths
Values

Target market
Goals

Skills

Benefits

Your Unique...
Your unique value
proposition statement

• I use my _______________ to _________
for ____________.
• I support/help/______...
Unique value proposition
Leveraging my knowledge
and expertise of
communicating effectively
English content into Latin
Ame...
Create Your Brand
To convey that
you are
established.
To attract
more clients.
To increase
your credibility.
To be more memorable.
To stand out in your field.
• To look "bigger‖ and
more ―professional.‖
To give clients a
sense of stability.
To explain your company name.
To endear your
company
name to your
clients.
To show what
practices
differentiate
you from your
competition.
To show your
commitment
and for the
sense of
personal
pride it will
add to your
language
service.
Your Visual Identity
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•
•

Headshot
Font(s)
Color(s)
Images
Logo
Textures
Background
Your Brand Identity System
• Email templates that contain their signature and contact
information
• A website that reflect...
Headshots
• BetterBusinessShots.com
•  
White background
•  2-3 looks, professional hair and
makeup

•  Different angles
•...
red

orange

purple

So, what
color is
YOUR
Brand?

yellow
green

http://truecolorscareer.com/quiz.asp

blue
Brand Elements
Tangible
• Logo
• Visual Identity (color,
font, design)

Intangible
• Image
• Reputation
• Message
• Promis...
What goes into a

portfolio?
1.
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9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.

Career Summary
Personal Philosophy & Mission Statement
Bio
Resume
E-mail C...
1. Career Summary
• Description of who you are
• What you have done - accomplished
• Elements not included in your resume:...
Responsible for translating medical
file updates of patients in a general
doctor office.
Consistently translated patients’...
A Few Guidelines
• Use each verb only once.
• Tell the truth and keep industry jargon
to a minimum.
• Aim for sentences be...
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•

accomplished
achieved
acted
adapted
addressed
administered
...
2. Personal Philosophy &
Mission Statement
• Personal statement
about your guiding
principles
• Definition of your
purpose...
3. Your Bio
#1 - Consider Your

Audience
#2 - Keep It Short
#3 - Write It in the

Third Person
#4 - Focus on the Highlights
#5 - Personal Information is

Optional
#6 - Don’t be Bland
#7 - A Bio for Your

Website/Bl
og
4. Your Resume
Length

Education

Accomplishments

Proofreading

Essential
Ingredients

Contact
Information

Executive
Summary

Work Expe...
Length

Education

Accomplishments

Proofreading

Essential
Ingredients

Work
Experience

Contact
Information

Executive
S...
Length

Education

Accomplishments

Proofreading

Essential
Ingredients

Work
Experience

Contact
Information

Executive
S...
Length

Education

Accomplishments

Proofreading

Essential
Ingredients

Work
Experience

Contact
Information

Executive
S...
Length

Education

Accomplishments

Proofreading

Essential
Ingredients

Work
Experience

Contact
Information

Executive
S...
• Don't describe your hardware.

• Don't list standard software
applications such as MS Office.
• Don't include your rates...
Length

Education

Accomplishments

Proofreading

Essential
Ingredients

Work
Experience

Contact
Information

Executive
S...
• Be discreet about the
name of your current
employer.
• Remove all references
to salaries.
• Use job titles that will
mak...
Length

Education

Accomplishments

Proofreading

Essential
Ingredients

Work
Experience

Contact
Information

Executive
S...
Length

Education

Accomplishments

Proofreading

Essential
Ingredients

Work
Experience

Contact
Information

Executive
S...
Style Tips
• List the most recent experience first for each section.
• Leave out irrelevant tasks or job titles.
• Emphasi...
5. E-mail Cover Letter
• First opportunity to make an
impression
• Use a creative subject line.
Example:
"Experienced Tax Expert
French Language
...
Subject: Freelance Translator English<>Portuguese

Dear Sir/Madame,
I am a native speaker of Portuguese.
My minimum rate i...
Subject line: English <> French Translator Available Any time With High
Quality

Dear Sir or Madam,
My name is XXXX, my mo...
Opening paragraph
• I came across an article about your company in XXX
website. From research on your website and looking ...
Get their attention
• If you are looking for someone who can reach the
French culture in a cost and time effective way, I
...
Follow up with an action
statement
• Available for hire
• Link to online portfolio or
• Availability for an interview
Wrap It Up
• Close with "Sincerely"
• Type out your first and last name,
• Add your contact information below.
• Include y...
6. Accomplishments
• Major T/I career
accomplishments to
date
• Branded to match
resume
• Comprehensive
examples
7. Work Samples
• Copies of translated
material you are
proud of (source and
target)
• Client confidentiality
protected
• ...
ECSPlus Smart Translation
!
!
!

!
!

Translation Process:
! Translated texts filed in database to be reused
! 27% of tota...
8. Research, Publications,
and Reports
• Blog
• Articles
• List of sites
where you or
your work
appears on the
Internet
9. Testimonials and/or Letters
of Recommendation
Create a ―brag book‖ of:

• Recommendations
• Testimonials
• Performance ...
10. Awards and Honors
• Awards
• Trophies
• Contests
• Scholarships
11. Conferences and
Workshops
• Conferences
• Seminars
• Training sessions
• Workshops
• Leadership activities
12. Degrees, Licenses, and
Certifications
• Diplomas
• Certifications
John Doe
13. Professional
Development Activities
• Professional
organizations
you belong to
• Details of any of
their activities in...
14.
Volunteering/Community
Service
• Describe activities
• Your role
Digital Portfolio/

Personal Website
Why should it be

online?
Google is your biggest promoter!
If you’re not in Google, you don’t exist.
Available

anytime, anywhere
Tools to create

Online Portfolios
Wordpress
• No programming required
• Easy to make frequent
updates
• Automatic posting of your
content to Google’s
search...
Google Sites
Vizualize.me
Cvgram.me
Personal Portals
• About.me

• Flavors.me
Summary
 Provides professional way to showcase
your work
 Creates great first impression for
translation and interpretat...
Q&A
114
marcela@latitudescoach.com

MarcelaJenney
marcelareyes
latitudescoachblog.com
www.latitudescoach.com

mjenney
• Providing the training, tools and expertise to help you grow your
language business!

• Latitudescoach.com
How to Create Your Digital Portfolio #ATA54 Seminar
How to Create Your Digital Portfolio #ATA54 Seminar
How to Create Your Digital Portfolio #ATA54 Seminar
How to Create Your Digital Portfolio #ATA54 Seminar
How to Create Your Digital Portfolio #ATA54 Seminar
How to Create Your Digital Portfolio #ATA54 Seminar
How to Create Your Digital Portfolio #ATA54 Seminar
How to Create Your Digital Portfolio #ATA54 Seminar
How to Create Your Digital Portfolio #ATA54 Seminar
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How to Create Your Digital Portfolio #ATA54 Seminar

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Marcela Reyes' Seminar on Creating Your Digital Portfolio at #ata54.

The competitive translation market continues to change, as does the way translators prospect for work. Since most are trying to eliminate the paper trail, translators must re-learn how to effectively and professionally showcase their work. Online portfolios are not limited to artists. An online portfolio will increase your visibility and digital identity and offer you a unique opportunity to stand out from the crowd. This hands-on workshop, using five tools, will explore the essential elements of your portfolio, offer a step-by-step process to build your own e-portfolio, and provide tips for branding and marketing.

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  • Welcome to creating the ultimate translation business portfolio.In this part, we will review what a portfolio is.
  • What exactly is a portfolio?
  • A portfolio is simply a collection of your work that can be used to market yourlanguage services, apply for a job, highlight your professional experience ordocument what you’velearned.
  • Why do translators need a portfolio?
  • You, as a translator, need a portfolio tomake the linkbetween what you can do and what the prospective client or organization wantsfrom you. Your professional portfolio will distinguish you from the competition.It will clearly show your experience, and that you are serious about your career as a translator, and job search.The professional portfolio will show an example of your unique strengths, and pique the interest of your potential clients or employers.
  • Also, a portfolio will help you build confidence in what you can do.It helps you ponder critical questions: What are my professional activities?What outcomes do these activities produce?Am I adequately documenting these outcomes soothers can see my contributions?Do my activities and the outcomes they producematch my professional?What do I want/need to change/enhance aboutwhat I do and the outcomes I document?
  • A portfolio will help you keep track on everything you have done in your professional career as a translator.
  • A portfolio will help you decide where to go next.
  • Also, it will definitely help you to get you attention.
  • And something very important for freelancers is that a portfolio will help you stand out from the crowd!
  • Welcome to creating the ultimate translation business portfolio.In this part, we will review what a portfolio is.
  • Creating your personal brand statement requires you to put is all together. Everything that we have studied so far, that is your vision, your purpose, your values, your passions, your goals, your personality characteristics, your strengths, skills, reputation, target market and what makes you different from your competitors.
  • Why to Have a Brand Identity SystemThere are many reasons to use a brand identity system. You should create a brand identity system: To convey that you are established. A logo and professionally-printed materials show that you are committed to both your business and your clients. It also makes you look like you&apos;ve been around for some time, and that you&apos;re stable. 
  • To attract more clients. Some clients look for a well-defined company, and &quot;look and feel&quot; may be one of their criteria in making a purchasing decision. Others are &quot;wowed&quot; by professional-looking materials, and your visual identity may impress them into buying. 
  • To increase your credibility. Your brand identity system makes you look experienced and professional, and can go a long way towards making your language business appear credible. And, if you&apos;d like to be known as an expert in your field, this type of credibility is the first thing you have to establish. 
  • To be more memorable. Forty percent of people better remember what they see than what they hear or read. So having graphics associated with your business and having consistent graphics on your business materials make you more likely to come to the forefront of potential clients&apos; minds when they have a need for your goods or services. 
  • To stand out in your field. A well-designed logo and an identity system can put you far above the competition, especially if they are paired with a strong marketing program. 
  • To look &quot;bigger.&quot; Home-printed business cards with perforated edges or cards printed with standard designs available through Microsoft software or online business card vendors scream &quot;small-time vendor&quot; to your potential clients—and that is how they will want to compensate you. 
  • To give clients a sense of stability. You may not have been in business &quot;since 1908,&quot; but if you have invested in an identity, you are much less likely to fold in the eyes of your clients. It goes a long way toward building that all-important &quot;trust.&quot; 
  • To explain your company name. If you have a company name with a little-known word or an acronym, the visual identity system can give visual clues to its meaning. 
  • To endear your company name to your clients. A difficult-to-pronounce or hard-to-remember company name may make it challenging for your clients to hire you. When potential clients have the need for your services, they might not recall who you are. But if you reinforce the name with interesting, compelling graphics, they are more likely to remember you, pick up the phone, and hire you. This is particular important if you are a translator or an interpreter with a hard-to remember or pronounce name. 
  • To show what practices differentiate you from your competition. A well-designed identity system can have many subtle meanings and can begin to tell the story of how you do business, including the special practices that make you stand apart from the competition. 
  • To show your commitment and for the sense of personal pride it will add to your language service. In other words, do it for yourself. A logo will increase your confidence, and that will show through in all of your business interactions and practices.
  • Your visual identity system should include:A professional headshot. Avoid pictures of you that don’t look very professional. Font(s) Color(s)ImagesLogoTexturesBackground
  • Successful translators and interpreters construct that system through many different means, including: Personalized stationery for their business or personal correspondence Business cards that reflect themselves and their company Thank-you notes that say a lot about their brand Answering-machine messages that say a lot about them and their brand Email templates that contain their signature, contact information, social media links and communicate specific messages about their brand A website that reflects their brand in its content, design and navigational tools A Welcome Kit or other materials they use during initial contacts with a client Marketing materials (brochures, testimonials, etc.) that are consistent with all other elements in their brand-identity system A portfolio / curriculum vitae / resume / biography / proposal that clearly communicates the qualities of their brands A visual graphic identity system—logo, standard fonts, textures, images, colors and other graphic elements—that consistently communicates their brand through artwork, typography and layout A feedback form or other tool you use to measure your success with each client at the end of or at different stages of your business relationship. Successful brands are authentic, so all the elements in your brand identity system need to communicate the same brand attributes.
  •  Your headshot should look professional. You may want to use BetterBusinessShots.com, an online service where you just enter your zip code and it will show you a hand-picked list of recommended photographers in your area. Check their samples, testimonials, bio and location, and then choose the photographer who&apos;ll help you to create a professional business photo.Make sure your headshot has a white background. Also, have 2-3 looks, professional hair and makeup.  Different angles.  Fuller shots for variety of cropping options.  Opt for high-resolution and scale down as needed.
  • You also need to decide what color communicates your brand more effectively. Please note this is not about what your favorite color is, but the color that is more appropriate for you and your brand attributes. If you want to learn what color communicates your brand more effectively, I encourage you to respond to the quiz listed on the screen. Let’s watch this video.
  • Cover letterCareer SummaryGoalsPersonal Brand Statement in a Tag Line Form and Mission StatementBioResumeAccomplishmentsWork SamplesResearch, Publications, and ReportsTestimonials and Letters of RecommendationAwards and HonorsConferences and WorkshopsTranscripts, Degrees, Licenses, and CertificationsProfessional Development ActivitiesVolunteering/Community ServiceReferences and testimonials
  • Career SummaryThis is a description of who you are through what you have done throughout your career as a linguist. You can include elements that are not in your resume (such as your work ethic, professional interests, philosophy about life and work, etc.).
  • Imagine that you worked as a medical translator in your last job. Now, compare these two statements and decide which one is stronger:Responsible for translating medical file updates of patients in a general doctor office.Consistently translated patients’ medical files at 3000 words per day
  • Use each verb only once. If you say “accomplished” ten times, it becomes boring to the reader. Vary your language.  Tell the truth and keep industry jargon to a minimum. You might think that you are using standard terms, but the person screening your resume might not understand the intricacies of your profession. You need to be able to explain yourself to whoever could be reading your resume.  When you write your portfolio, make sure you use punchy sentences. Aim for sentences between 15 and 20 words. If your sentences are too long, break them into shorter ones. If they seem short and choppy, vary your presentation to combine sentences with bulleted lists.Use common words to communicate quickly and effectively. Avoid words that readers have to look up in the dictionary. For example, don’t use “obfuscate” when “confuse” will do, or you will lose your reader.  You can omit pronouns (I, you, he, she, they) and articles (a, the) to keep your statements fresh and save space. In some environments, this also seems more professional, while in others, people might prefer a more personal touch. Think about your intended audience when choosing your approach.  
  • Now, write your top five skills. If you need some ideas for verbs, have a look at the box of action verbs here. They can help you punch up your action statements. Use what you have learned to edit and polish your presentation. Remember that your goal is to motivate the reader to take action.
  • This is a personal statement about your guiding principles that define you as well as your unique value proposition. Consider this your personal executive summary.
  • The third item is your bio. In the business world, we summarize our experience, qualifications, education, skill sets and any other important aspects of our professional life – and sometimes even our personal life – in a document called a résumé or curriculum vitae. This document may vary from one culture to another in length, format, style, information presented, etc. Nevertheless, it is an important component of our marketing kit, regardless of the culture we are trying to target. However, this tool does not really highlight all those personal characteristics that make us different from others.There is another piece that should be part of our marketing kit that we tend to underestimate but which can be very powerful. That is a biography or “bio.” In a few words, a bio is simply the story of our life. And since there is just one of us, our story is worth sharing with others. Stories are fascinating. Stories engage and connect us with our target market through purpose and passion.Let your human side shine through your story. Your audience wants to find that special connection with you. And there is no better way to “connect” than by sharing your story.
  • When writing your bio, follow these tips:#1 Tip: Consider Your AudienceThe first thing to consider when writing your bio is your audience. In other words, who will be reading your bio? Will it be visitors to your website? Translation agencies? Direct clients? Readers of an article that you wrote? The reason why this is important is because what you include in your bio will vary depending on the target audience.
  • #2 Tip: Keep It ShortA good length for a professional bio is between 150 and 300 words. You don’t need to write a novel.
  • Write it in the third person.This means you write your professional bio as though someone else is talking about you. So, instead of writing &quot;I am&quot; and &quot;I graduated&quot;, you would write ”Maria Perez is&quot; and &quot;She graduated&quot;.Use your full name (first and last) the first time. After that, it&apos;s up to you whether you want to refer to yourself by your full name, just your first name, or just your last name.There are a few exceptions to the &quot;third person rule&quot;. Write in first person in these circumstances:1) When you are writing a mini-bio for Twitter, Facebook, MySpace and other social networking sites. Social networks are informal gathering places, so a less formal bio is appropriate. 2) When the person or agency requesting your bio has specified that they want it in the first person.3) if you simply feel more comfortable writing your bio in the first person (it&apos;s your choice!).Don&apos;t get too hung up on the &quot;third person&quot; or &quot;first person&quot; issue. There&apos;s no absolute right or wrong, just conventions. Third person tends to sound formal and professional, whereas first person sounds more informal and friendly.If you do decide to write your bio in the first person, you will also need a version of it in the third person for occasions such as speaking engagements when someone else is introducing you..
  • #4 Tip: Focus on the HighlightsOne of the hardest things about writing a professional bio is summing up your whole career in just a few short paragraphs. It&apos;s important to remember just to cover the highlights.One trick that I use when writing a bio is to list a few items and then add the phrase &quot; to name just a few&quot; or &quot;among others&quot;. This way you can name some representative examples while still conveying that it is not a complete list.For example: &quot;John Smith has worked as a Spanish into English legal translator, professional voice over, and paralegal, to name just a few.&quot;
  • #5 Tip: Personal Information is OptionalSome people say that personal information, such as hometown, family and hobbies, is not relevant in a professional bio because it has nothing to do with the job. That may be true, but I find that most readers like getting a sense of who you are outside of your professional role. And that brings us to tip #6...
  • #6 Tip: Don&apos;t Be BlandYour professional bio is like a little advertisement for you, so make it reflect the real you. Write in your natural voice as much as possible, and include at least one fact that shows who you are as a person. One way to do that is to mention a hobby.For example, &quot;When not translating, Pedro loves playing the guitar.”
  • #7 Tip: A Bio for Your Website/BlogIn tip #1 above, I said that a professional bio should be as short as possible. There&apos;s one exception to that rule: your website or blog. If you want to write a longer bio for your website or blog, that&apos;s fine. Just make sure you break it into short paragraphs. Try to keep paragraphs short - no more than three sentences. It&apos;s much easier to read computer text when it&apos;s broken into short paragraphs.
  • Last, but not least, include a professional headshot of you. Including an up-to-date photo with your bio page can draw people into the page and help them make a connection with you. Avoid using a random snapshot from your vacation or a camera phone shot. Get a headshot or environmental portrait professionally taken. (The type of photo you want may depend on the nature of your work or the tone of your site.)
  • Another item that should go into your portfolio is your resume. Resumes are not on too many bestseller lists. They are normally pretty dry, so creating one that helps you to stand out from the crowd is no easy task. You have to make sure that the spelling is perfect, the formatting is consistent, and that your first statements grab the reader’s attention. However, isn’t the competition doing the same? How can you make your resume stand out?  Your resume is a marketing sheet. It concisely tells a potential employer what you know and do. Following some guidelines will help you to produce a brilliant resume. The best resume is one for which you generate the content, but if you’re struggling, help is available to package it brilliantly. 
  • You might think that you can just sit in front of a computer for an hour and whip off a good resume, but this is not so. The best resumes are the result of learning the resume‑writing process and allowing yourself the time to really create. Once you’ve created all kinds of notes and prepared your final material, you will be left with something that is comprehensive and valuable, rather than just another non-descript resume, cranked out from a template. This careful construction will make your resume stand out.
  • LengthYour resume should be no more than two pages, although there are exceptions. In today’s busy office, the resume screener and manager would love to have a one-page resume, so if you can say everything that needs saying in one page, do so. Otherwise, most resumes stick to an unofficial two-page cutoff. If you cannot say it in two pages, you are probably saying too much. You should know that, if your resume is longer than two pages, it probably won’t be read. However, there are exceptions. Academic and scientific resumes are often longer than two pages because they are virtually portfolios. These kinds of resumes are referred to as Curriculum Vitae (CV),and include examples of professionally published work and research. You should only prepare a CV if it is specifically requested for a particular position or if that’s the format used in your target market.  A good rule of thumb is to review your resume and ask yourself if every statement helps potential recruiters, employers or prospects learn something about you. If they won’t get any value from what you are saying, leave it out.
  • ProofreadingNever, ever skip this step. You must proofread your material very closely and then recruit some help. Often, when we re-read material that we have written ourselves, our brain recognizes it as correct, even if it’s not. Even keen spellers can find it difficult to see errors in their own work. The spellcheck function on your computer is of some value, of course, but it will not recognize contextual mistakes, like using “hear” when you should use “here.” Don’t ask just anyone to help you with this step: ask a strong speller.Make sure you use the same language as the client or agency you’re trying to work with. If English is not your native language or your culture is different from the culture of your potential client, make sure the resume or CV follows the same standards and communication style as the target culture.
  • Contact InformationAll of your important personal data (name, address, and telephone number, social media sites, website, blog, etc.) must be correct. You can also include an e-mail address, but be mindful of the one you use. Sometimes, when using free sites like Hotmail, people tend to have very creative addresses. If you decide to use an e-mail address in your contact information, create one that sounds professional. If you are a freelance, you should get your own domain and use it for all your communications. That feature will make you stand out from the crowd.It is also a good idea to check your spam filter on a daily basis in case employer or client inquiries are getting stuck there. Full mailing address (including country).  If you put your name or address in characters, also include a phonetic or alphabetic version.  For example, you could have Chinese-character name/address on the first line and a Pin-Yin (phonetic style) name/address beneath it.  The reason is so non-Chinese writers can word-process or type it and alphabetize it in a list of names from many countries. Phone numbers.  Be sure to include Country-code.  Note if different numbers for home and work (office) .  Cell and fax numbers are good to include here if you have them. E-mail address(es) – double check! Website address – double check! (NOTE: if you refer potential customers to your own website, make sure the English in it is perfect)
  • Executive Summary Forget an “objective” section. That is nothing more than saying where you hope to be in a few years or what kind of opportunity you are seeking, which are basically obvious. Instead, draft a summary of who you are as an expert (we are all experts in our own way and the masters of our own experiences). This summary is basically your personal “mission statement” of who you are and what you are known for, and it will give the reader an idea of where you can best fit in in the organization. Describe the qualities and achievements that make you stand out, including your Unique Selling Proposition. Make sure to include special awards, accommodations and recognitions you have received. In this section you can write in paragraph form about your career as a translator. Include information about how many years you have been a translator, languages spoken, areas of expertise, and types of translation jobs you have experience with, such as resume translation, online correspondence and oversees corporate work. If you grew up speaking one of your offered languages, mention that you are a &quot;native&quot; speaker. Also, list in point-by-point format specific services you offer as a translator, like proofreading and transcription.Indicate your specialization. It is likely to be the second thing a project or vendor manager looks for on your resume. When looking for a particular area of expertise for a project, many translation companies use indexing and keyword search tools to help them sift through the resumes on file. Having your specializations listed will help ensure that a word search leads to your resume. For example, if you are a French medical translator, make sure you list the words “French” and “medical.” If you are just starting out, you may not have substantial experience in a particular field, but it is still a good idea to indicate something you would like to specialize in and that you are actively pursuing. However, if you already include an executive summary in your portfolio, you can skip this section.
  • Skill SummaryThis is excellent for translators and interpreters since it is very likely you have done similar work in many different organizations. It should include at least one statement that describes an achievement, and it should support your freelance goals.Mention what your native language is and your target language(s). Also, indicate from and into what languages you translate/interpret into.If you are seeking work with agencies, indicate your experience with computer-aided translation (CAT) tools and whether you use such tools on a regular basis. Do you own and are you proficient in the use of a particular tool, such as TRADOS 7 Freelance? If the answer is “yes”, make sure that is reflected in your resume. Make sure you list specific CAT tools, since this is another area where translation companies use indexing and keyword searches. This information is not necessary if you are trying to get work with direct clients.Provide information on your desktop publishing (DTP) capabilities. Skills in using DTP applications such as InDesign or QuarkXpress are good to have, as they might set you apart from other translators. You can also create a separate sheet named Production Tools.
  • Do not include the following in your skill summary:Don&apos;t describe your hardware and don&apos;t list standard software applications such as MS Office. It is assumed that you already know how to use these programs, and the reader will wonder why they are listed. However, you might want to mention which platform(s) you are using, especially if you are a Mac user.Don&apos;t include your rates. Of course, it is important that the project manager knows what you charge, but your resume is not a good place to provide such information. It is a good idea to submit a separate document containing your rate information, or to include such information in an accompanying message (or cover letter). Don&apos;t submit hard copies. While a paper resume can be printed on fancy paper and look impressive, it is the content, not the form, that is important to the project or vendor manager. More importantly, a digital resume is searchable and does not take up physical space. Last, but certainly not least, don&apos;t make things up—be truthful and accurate.
  • Work ExperienceUse this section to highlight your most qualifying translation/interpretation experience. Put them in chronological order to keep it organized. Avoid wasting space. (For example, don’t include employer addresses.) Indicate the number of years you are experienced as a translator or interpreter. Example: I have (‘X’) years professional experience translating (Language ‘Y’) &gt; EnglishThen, list your current or most recent translation (or localization) job of significance OR list translation company(ies) you work for on a regular basis, then various other translation companies you have worked for or other jobs you have done. Note in particular jobs you are particularly proud of, or that you can provide references for. These should be listed in reverse chronological order (start with most recent).Also, list other relevant experience. Using same format as above, list specific non-translation experience you have had that might be of interest to potential customers, in reverse chronological order. Avoid including information that could cause problems for you. For example, if you are posting your resume online, you will probably need to be discreet about the name of your current employer in case someone from your current workplace comes across your resume online.  Remove all references to salaries, along with any reference as to why you left your former position. Avoid mentioning availability dates as well.Use job titles that will make sense to a potential employer. Avoid jargon here; if your job title was not descriptive of the work you did, change the language. For example, “L10N” means nothing outside of the company that invented the acronym, even though you know it means “Localization.” On your resume, it makes more sense to refer to that position as “Localization Specialist.” As a rule, include no more than 10 years of work history unless previous experience is important. If you have not used a particular skill in the past 10 years, chances are you will need to do some kind of upgrading before using it again.
  • Avoid including information that could cause problems for you. For example, if you are posting your resume online, you will probably need to be discreet about the name of your current employer in case someone from your current workplace comes across your resume online.  Remove all references to salaries, along with any reference as to why you left your former position. Use job titles that will make sense to a potential employer. Avoid jargon here; if your job title was not descriptive of the work you did, change the language. For example, “L10N” means nothing outside of the company that invented the acronym, even though you know it means “Localization.” On your resume, it makes more sense to refer to that position as “Localization Specialist.” As a rule, include no more than 10 years of work history unless previous experience is important. If you have not used a particular skill in the past 10 years, chances are you will need to do some kind of upgrading before using it again.
  • AccomplishmentsDepending on the type of work you have done and the contributions you have made, you may have a lot or a little to say about your achievements. You may want to list some of your achievements with your work experience, or you may want to list them in a separate category.  Businesses have pretty limited interests, most of which focus around profit. Your accomplishments need to show potential recruiters, employers or prospects how good you will be at making and saving them money. If you keep that in mind, you will be able to easily select the right accomplishments to include. This does not mean that you should not include examples that cannot be qualified with numbers and dollars. It just means that you should quantify as many examples as you can.
  • EducationIf you have recently graduated (or are about to graduate) and do not have much work experience, put this section ahead of the work experience section. If your experience is more valuable, then the work experience section goes before this section. Your highest educational achievement goes first on the list. Include courses and qualifications that you earned outside of school that support your application -- safety courses, workshops, and certificates. Include relevant association memberships and credentials, such as ATA certification. 
  • General Style TipsList the most recent experience first for each section. If you had more than one position with a company, list the most senior position first. Leave out irrelevant tasks or job titles. Emphasize your accomplishments by using bold, italics, or underlining.  Include some comments about your work from a supervisor, manager, or customer (like an endorsement you might see on the cover of a book).  Include volunteer or community service involvement that supports your application. (Captain of the marbles team in elementary school does not fit here.) Exclude religious or political comments unless you are applying to a religious organization or political party.Do not provide references or state &quot;references upon request.&quot; You need references, but not on your resume. You don&apos;t want your valued references being called before you have a chance to let them know. If a company requires references, it will ask you for them when you are seriously being considered for the position. Listing &quot;references upon request&quot; at the bottom of your resume is a given and wastes valuable space.
  • Most linguists work virtually with clients faraway from home. Email communication might be the first opportunity you have to make a good impression on your potential clients.An email cover letter should be written as any other business letter. Let’s review some important guidelines when drafting an email cover letter.  
  • An email cover letter is your first opportunity to make an impression on a potential client. Here are some tips on how to format and craft an email cover letter.Use a creative subject line.The application process may stipulate what you&apos;re required to put in the subject line. If there&apos;s no requirement, try to catch their attention right away. Here&apos;s an example: &quot;Experienced IT French Language Professional: Available For Hire Immediately.&quot;Find out who you&apos;re talking to.Before you start your cover letter, make your address on the email to a human being. A &quot;Dear Sir&quot; or &quot;To Whom It May Concern&quot; opening can be a “kiss of death” on a cover letter. Find out the person&apos;s name so the salutation can read, &quot;Dear Mr. Smith”. And make sure it is spelled correctly!.
  • For the opening paragraph, make sure you use a compelling statement.Here are a few examples:I came across an article about your company in XXX website. From research on your website and looking at the marketplace, I am sure of a couple of things. First, yours is the kind of company that I want to be associated with, and second, I have the skills that you can use.Staying current in our industry is tough because it changes so rapidly and many professionals find it hard to keep up. I am someone who keeps up with those changes, and I hope that you would like to meet so that we can talk about how I can help you to embrace the future.I read your advertisement in the Daily News on May 17 and, after researching your organization, I think that I have something to offer you.Your May 17th article in Multilingual Magazine caught my attention, and your company name caught my eye.
  • Give potential recruiters, clients or prospects a reason to get curious about you. Bridge your opening paragraph with something like:If you are looking for someone who can reach the French culture in a cost and time effective way, I can help you by communicating continental French to your stakeholders.If you still have a need in this area, my resume demonstrates my dedication and commitment to what I do. Then you can include one or two sentences that highlight a special contribution or achievement:I have 15 years experience in the translation industry, built on a degree from the Translation Institute of France. My background has enabled me to consistently identify and implement the right technology, tools and approach to close the communication gap in French in your prestigious organization.  Your letter can be presented in bullet form or paragraphs.
  • Follow up with an action statement. You want the reader to open your resume or click on the link where you have your online portfolio.“I am happy to schedule a call to speak with you about what I can bring to your organization. I have a (online) portfolio that you can review.”Let the prospective client know when you&apos;re available for hire. Let them know how to access your resume, whether it&apos;s as an attachment to the email or a link to an online resume. Your closing paragraph should encourage the client to take an action. Hopefully they&apos;re excited at the prospect of contacting your or hiring you at this point, so try to give them a little nudge. Let them know what hours you&apos;re available for an interview. Encourage them to call or email you, and let them know that you look forward to hearing from them soon.
  • Wrap It UpClose with &quot;Sincerely,&quot; type out your first and last name, and then type your contact information below that. Include your phone number(s), email address and your web page (if applicable). If you have a blog, make sure you include the URL to it, too. Once you&apos;ve written an email cover letter, paste it in a word processor and double check it for spelling and grammar errors. Read it out loud to listen for any awkward phrases. If a week goes by after you&apos;ve sent it out, it&apos;s appropriate to send a follow-up email to make sure they received your materials.The format for an email cover letter is basically the same as a printed one, with a few minor changes. Remember that the main idea is to sell yourself to the prospective client, and don&apos;t be afraid to deviate from &quot;traditional&quot; cover letter styles if you think you can make yourself stand out more.
  • Accomplishments is another important item to include in your portfolio.Include a detailed list of all your major career accomplishments to date.  This section should be branded to match your resume.. You can include comprehensive examples in this section.
  • These are often printed copies of the work that you have done, although they could be in a multimedia format. Include reports, papers, studies, brochures, projects, presentations, and so on. Make sure that they are crisp, clean copies. This makes the intangible tangible and demonstrative proof of your abilities and accomplishments. Pull together examples and lists of reports, white papers, business cases, projects summaries, return-on-investment case studies and customer testimonials that you have produced. If you are an interpreter, you can create a youtube video with your doing an actual interpretation. However, make sure you always, always, get permission from your clients before posting any work samples.
  • 8. Research, publications and reports.This is an area where you can highlight your writing, research, and conference submissions, for example.  A list and samples of articles you have published• Research you have worked on• Articles written about you or projects you have been involved in as reported in newspapers, company newsletters, etc.• A list of sites where you or your work appears on the Internet
  • Collect any compliments and testimonials and place them in this section. This section can also include copies of your performance evaluations and reviews. Create a “brag book” of recommendations, testimonials, performance appraisals, promotions and letters of accommodations. Many people feel this is too aggressive, narcissistic or cocky to actually create a book of acknowledgement. Is it “cocky” for an organization to create marketing brochures and billboards highlighting awards and trophies they have won? Of course not! You are promoting brand “You”. Do not be shy about communicating that to the marketplace!
  • Awards and HonorsGather any certificates, awards, trophies, contests one, notable achievements or honors that you have received. If any of these awards have garnered any media, press or additional business make sure you denote the added marketing significance you have earned. This significantly enhances your credibility as an expert and solidifies other claims you make on your resume and executive summary.
  • Conferences and WorkshopsInclude a list of conferences, seminars, training sessions, and workshops that you have participated in or attended. This can include completion certificates, a copy of the program highlights, or agenda.
  • It is rare for an client to ask for your transcripts, but copies of degrees or other documents are often required, like translation certificates, school diplomas, etc.
  • Professional Development ActivitiesThis is a list of professional associations to which you belong or for which you volunteer. Underscore the professional organizations in which you are a member and details of any of their activities in which you have played a key role.
  • Volunteering/Community ServiceDescribe these activities as they relate to your career. Part of being a successful leader and business driver in any industry or career field is offering and applying yourself and experience to volunteer, not-for-profit and community work. It demonstrates to a potential employer that you are not one-dimensional and just looking for a job, but someone who wants to give back to the employing organization as well. If you are not currently performing any volunteer or community work, go out and find some groups to get involved with now.
  • Isn’t it nice to find a website that is well-designed, easy to use, and tells you exactly what you want to know quickly and without hassle? Or to find a website that instantly inspires you as soon as you see it? Translation companies and translation buyers feel the same way about finding a candidate whose information is easy to read, clean, and thorough. They like it when candidates make it easy to recruit them by creating easy-to-read application materials that paint a detailed, well-matched picture of the job candidate. Aside from your resume or cover letter, one great way to accomplish this is by creating your own professional portfolio online. It’s a lot easier than it sounds, and it can be very helpful in finding translation or interpreting work.
  • There are some great online tools to help you create your online portfolio. Remember, you must have an online presence.
  • WordPress is a free and open source blogging tool and a dynamic content management system (CMS). It has many features, including a plug-in architecture and a template system. WordPress is used by over 14.7% of Alexa Internet&apos;s &quot;top 1 million&quot; websites and, as of August 2011, manages 22% of all new websites. WordPress is currently the most popular CMS in use on the Internet.Creating and managing a portfolio is where WordPress really shines! There are almost too many portfolio themes to count, and new ones are being developed all the time. Simply google “portfoliowordpress themes” and you’ll find all kind of themes, from free to very sophisticated ones. 
  • Business-Oriented.Publish, upload their CVs and connect.More than 100 million professionals registered world wide.Great for sharing news, business related articles and press releases, for finding and maintaining business Contacts and recruiting.Promoting B2B companies &amp; services.Share news &amp; interesting articles with industry professionals.Xing (more than 10 million members, Germany) Viadeo (more than 35 million members, France).
  • Vizualize.me will turn your resume into a stunning infographic. It creates clean graphical representations of your skills, work history and your connections on LinkedIn in an easy-to-scan format that combines both design and clarity of information. What more could you ask for?! You will even be able to choose from a large range of colors, backgrounds and fonts to make your CV to your liking. This is definitely my favorite website.
  • CVgram.meA similar website you can use is cvgram.me. Like vizualize.me, it also allows you to create graphical representations of your skills, work history and professional achievements. I like the fact that it highlights your expertise with graphs to show the proficiency vs. the frequency of use of each of your specialties and determines your top skills. Two weak points are the poor readability of the fonts and the selection of backgrounds that are more for a desktop background than for a professional document.http://cvgram.me/
  • If you cringe at the thought of creating or investing in your own website, ‘Personal Portals’ is the solution. About.me and Flavors.me allow you to create a nice one-page portal for free that basically becomes your website and landing page on the web. They will both give you a vanity URL which can be used as your website address on business cards, social media channels, etc. These sites are easy to use and provide dashboards to check how often your portal has been viewed. Once again, your headshot and branded bio have a place to be seen throughout the year.
  • Online Portfolios aren’t just for certain fields or industries anymore. The importance of having a professional online presence is more important than ever, and an online portfolio will certainly increase your visibility and presence. Creating your portfolio website allows you to share and showcase your work easily with the employers you’d like to work for.1. Provides professional way to showcase your workBuilding a website about your brand and experience is a polished way to share your expertise with others. Websites can be more creative and innovative than traditional portfolios and are able to share with anyone in the world.Suggested resources:2. Creates great first impression for employersIf an employer sees your website link in your signature or on your resume, they’ll likely click on it to see what you’ve built. Seeing you’ve taken the time to build a website featuring work samples, recommendations, previous presentations and more will be a killer first impression.3. Increases your visibility and online presenceWhen an employer Googles your name, your professional portfolio will be one of the first search results that pops up.4. Shows you’re more than just a resumeBecause of the flexibility of an online portfolio, you’re able to show your personality by choosing design, layout and the copy you write.5. Offers flexibilityWith the click of a button, you can change content, videos, copy and pictures on your online portfolio. You can also constantly create new content to add to your site to show your continuous learning process—whether employed or not.
  • Here is my contact information for future reference.
  • Transcript of "How to Create Your Digital Portfolio #ATA54 Seminar"

    1. 1. Creating your Digital Portfolio Marcela Reyes, MBA Chief Branding Officer
    2. 2. A bit about me • • • • • • • • • • • • • 20+ years industry experience MBA in Marketing Adjunct Professor Marketing for Translators UCSD 13+ years as a ATA certified Eng>SP translator Certified Localization Project Manager Blue Ocean Strategy Certified Practitioner Professional business, marketing coach and branding coach Reach Certified Personal Branding Strategist Reach Certified Online Identity Strategist Certified 360Reach™ Brand Assessment Analyst 2010-2012 ATA’s Spanish Language Division Administrator Columnist Blogger
    3. 3. Have you ever… • Attended an ATA seminar before? • Attended a marketing seminar/workshop before?
    4. 4. What’s a Portfolio?
    5. 5. It’s a collection of your work that can be used to market your language services, apply for a job, highlight your professional experience or document what you’ve learned.
    6. 6. Why do you need a Portfolio?
    7. 7. To make the link between what you can do and what the prospective client or organization wants from you.
    8. 8. To build confidence in what you can do.
    9. 9. To help you remember what you’ve done.
    10. 10. To help you decide where to go next.
    11. 11. To get you attention!
    12. 12. To stand out from the crowd!
    13. 13. How do I get started on creating an e-portfolio?
    14. 14. Before your embark on creating a portfolio, you need to…
    15. 15. Identify your value proposition
    16. 16. • What you do? • For whom? • What makes you unique
    17. 17. Employers and clients want a strategic portfolio which clearly demonstrates that the translator fits the company’s culture and vision, is qualified to work in their industry, and meets the specific requirements of the position, projects or assignments.
    18. 18. How do you craft your unique value proposition?
    19. 19. Extract Yourself Your Competitors Your Target Audience
    20. 20. My ideal job right now is to work as a _______.
    21. 21. Know yourself Focus on what you do well – be a super-hero (or heroine) within your strengths. Personal development resources: 1. Myers-Briggs Personality Test: www.myersbriggs.org 2. VIA Survey of Character Strengths: www.authentichappiness.sas.upenn.edu 3. Belbin Team Roles: www.belbin.com 4. The Highlands Ability Battery: www.highlandsco.com 5. Personal SWOT Analysis www.businessballs.com/swotanalysisfreetemplate.htm 6. Personal PEST Analysis: www.businessballs.com/pestanalysisfreetemplate.htm 7. Strengths Finder: http://www.strengthsfinder.com/home.aspx?gclid=CMDH-d8_6sCFQor7AodHQR9pA 8. 360 Reach Assessment: www.reachcc.com/360v5register
    22. 22. Your differentiators • What separates your from your competition? • What makes you unique and different than others who provide similar services? • Differentiate, not imitate!
    23. 23. What makes you different? • Who are your competitors? • What makes your services unique? • What do you offer that your competitors don’t? • How do your services create better results for your ideal clients? • And how specifically will you help them with their struggle? • What specific steps will you take them through to help them solve their problem? • List several benefits your clients will receive from working with you. How will their business or their life or anything be improved?
    24. 24. Who is your target audience? • What their particular struggles/problems they are experiencing right now. • How working with you solves these types of problems?
    25. 25. What’s in it for them? • What’s in it for your client to work with you? • It’s about conviction, not just the results • What can you promise?
    26. 26. ―If you work with me‖ exercise If you work with me, you’re going to get: ______________________________.
    27. 27. Put it all together Vision Differentiators Purpose Strengths Values Target market Goals Skills Benefits Your Unique Value Proposition
    28. 28. Your unique value proposition statement • I use my _______________ to _________ for ____________. • I support/help/______________ by____________ ________________. • Leveraging my _______________ and __________, I deliver___________ to________.
    29. 29. Unique value proposition Leveraging my knowledge and expertise of communicating effectively English content into Latin American Spanish, I support individuals, organizations, academic institutions and government agencies to promote public awareness on women’s issues and intercultural conflicts.
    30. 30. Create Your Brand
    31. 31. To convey that you are established.
    32. 32. To attract more clients.
    33. 33. To increase your credibility.
    34. 34. To be more memorable.
    35. 35. To stand out in your field.
    36. 36. • To look "bigger‖ and more ―professional.‖
    37. 37. To give clients a sense of stability.
    38. 38. To explain your company name.
    39. 39. To endear your company name to your clients.
    40. 40. To show what practices differentiate you from your competition.
    41. 41. To show your commitment and for the sense of personal pride it will add to your language service.
    42. 42. Your Visual Identity • • • • • • • Headshot Font(s) Color(s) Images Logo Textures Background
    43. 43. Your Brand Identity System • Email templates that contain their signature and contact information • A website that reflects their brand in its content, design and navigational tools • A Welcome Kit or other materials they use during initial contacts with a client • A portfolio / curriculum vitae / resume / biography / proposal • A visual graphic identity system—logo, standard fonts, textures, images, colors and other graphic elements • Personalized stationery • Business cards • Thank-you notes • Answering-machine messages • Marketing materials (brochures, testimonials, etc.) that are consistent with all other elements in their brand-identity system • A feedback form
    44. 44. Headshots • BetterBusinessShots.com •   White background •  2-3 looks, professional hair and makeup •  Different angles •   Fuller shots for variety of cropping options •   High-resolution and scale down
    45. 45. red orange purple So, what color is YOUR Brand? yellow green http://truecolorscareer.com/quiz.asp blue
    46. 46. Brand Elements Tangible • Logo • Visual Identity (color, font, design) Intangible • Image • Reputation • Message • Promise Brand Perception
    47. 47. What goes into a portfolio?
    48. 48. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. Career Summary Personal Philosophy & Mission Statement Bio Resume E-mail Cover Letter Accomplishments Work Samples Research, Publications, and Reports Testimonials and/or Letters of Recommendation Awards and Honors Conferences and Workshops Degrees, Licenses, and Certifications Professional Development Activities Volunteering/Community Service
    49. 49. 1. Career Summary • Description of who you are • What you have done - accomplished • Elements not included in your resume: – – – – – Unique value proposition Work ethic Professional interests Philosophy about life and work Other facts you feel are significant
    50. 50. Responsible for translating medical file updates of patients in a general doctor office. Consistently translated patients’ medical files at 3000 words per day.
    51. 51. A Few Guidelines • Use each verb only once. • Tell the truth and keep industry jargon to a minimum. • Aim for sentences between 15 and 20 words. • Use common words. • Omit pronouns and articles.
    52. 52. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • accomplished achieved acted adapted addressed administered advanced advised allocated analyzed appraised approved arranged assembled assigned assisted attained audited authored automated balanced budgeted built calculated cataloged chaired clarified classified coached collected compiled • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • completed • composed • computed • conceptualized • conducted • consolidated • contained • contracted • contributed • controlled • coordinated • corresponded • counseled • created • critiqued • cut • decreased • delegated • demonstrated • designed • developed • devised • diagnosed • directed • dispatched • distinguished • diversified • drafted • edited • educated • eliminated • enabled encouraged engineered enlisted established evaluated examined executed expanded expedited explained extracted fabricated facilitated fashioned focused forecast formatted founded generated guided identified illustrated implemented improved increased influenced informed initiated innovated inspected • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • installed instigated instituted instructed integrated interpreted interviewed introduced invented launched lectured led maintained managed marketed mediated moderated monitored motivated negotiated operated organized originated overhauled performed persuaded planned prepared presented prioritized processed • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • produced programmed projected promoted provided publicized published purchased recommended reconciled recorded recruited reduced referred regulated rehabilitated remodeled repaired represented researched restored restructured retrieved revitalized saved scheduled screened set shaped solidified solved • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • specified stimulated streamlined strengthened summarized supervised surveyed systemized tabulated taught trained translated traveled trimmed upgraded validated worked wrote
    53. 53. 2. Personal Philosophy & Mission Statement • Personal statement about your guiding principles • Definition of your purpose • Personal executive summary
    54. 54. 3. Your Bio
    55. 55. #1 - Consider Your Audience
    56. 56. #2 - Keep It Short
    57. 57. #3 - Write It in the Third Person
    58. 58. #4 - Focus on the Highlights
    59. 59. #5 - Personal Information is Optional
    60. 60. #6 - Don’t be Bland
    61. 61. #7 - A Bio for Your Website/Bl og
    62. 62. 4. Your Resume
    63. 63. Length Education Accomplishments Proofreading Essential Ingredients Contact Information Executive Summary Work Experience Skill Summary
    64. 64. Length Education Accomplishments Proofreading Essential Ingredients Work Experience Contact Information Executive Summary Skill Summary
    65. 65. Length Education Accomplishments Proofreading Essential Ingredients Work Experience Contact Information Executive Summary Skill Summary
    66. 66. Length Education Accomplishments Proofreading Essential Ingredients Work Experience Contact Information Executive Summary Skill Summary
    67. 67. Length Education Accomplishments Proofreading Essential Ingredients Work Experience Contact Information Executive Summary Skill Summary
    68. 68. • Don't describe your hardware. • Don't list standard software applications such as MS Office. • Don't include your rates. • Don't submit hard copies. • Don’t make things up!
    69. 69. Length Education Accomplishments Proofreading Essential Ingredients Work Experience Contact Information Executive Summary Skill Summary
    70. 70. • Be discreet about the name of your current employer. • Remove all references to salaries. • Use job titles that will make sense to a potential employer. • Avoid industry jargon • No more than 10 years of work history unless previous experience is important.
    71. 71. Length Education Accomplishments Proofreading Essential Ingredients Work Experience Contact Information Executive Summary Skill Summary
    72. 72. Length Education Accomplishments Proofreading Essential Ingredients Work Experience Contact Information Executive Summary Skill Summary
    73. 73. Style Tips • List the most recent experience first for each section. • Leave out irrelevant tasks or job titles. • Emphasize your accomplishments by using bold, italics, or underlining. • Include some comments about your work from a client, project manager, or employer. • Include volunteer or community service involvement that supports your application. • Exclude religious or political comments unless you are applying to a religious organization or political party. • Do not include references on the resume.
    74. 74. 5. E-mail Cover Letter
    75. 75. • First opportunity to make an impression • Use a creative subject line. Example: "Experienced Tax Expert French Language Professional: Available For Hire Immediately." • Find out who you're talking to. Tips
    76. 76. Subject: Freelance Translator English<>Portuguese Dear Sir/Madame, I am a native speaker of Portuguese. My minimum rate is 0.09 Euro per source word. But I prefer to work at 0.10 Euro per source word. I charge for my services at least 15 Euro per hour. And my minimum charge per document is 30 Euro. I have not obtained an official translator / linguist degree, but I still provide high-quality language services. I have been working as a translator since 2001. I provide the following services: Proofreading, Interpretation (consecutive), Interpretation (simultaneous), Market Research, Consulting, Translation, cultural consultancy/ training. By today, I have translated about more than 1,000,000 words. I use the following tools: SDL Trados, Passolo, Microsoft Office, tag editor, XBench. I am best in the following fields: Biology / Biotechnology, Business / Commerce (General), Computers (General), General, IT / E-Commerce / Internet, Marketing / Market Research, Media / Multimedia, Medicine (General), Medicine (Health Care), Medicine (Pharmaceuticals), Science (General), Medical, Pharmaceutical market research, science, Biology, Tourism, websites. I am not a sworn translator. I am available for work Full week, including weekends. I can provide you with references on request. The following keywords are related to my services: Portuguese, Brazilian, biology, medical, general, slang, finance, pharmaceutical, health, science, market research, environment, business, research, technical, information technology, legal PROFILE: I am a skilled language professional with over twelve years’ experience in bilingual communication including translation, interpretation, teaching and cultural training. I am also a former medical researcher with extensive experience in medical and business translations.
    77. 77. Subject line: English <> French Translator Available Any time With High Quality Dear Sir or Madam, My name is XXXX, my mother tongue is French and I am a Professional Translator (English to French). I am interested in providing my professional services in relation to this job opportunity, I have a high speed Internet connection and I check my e-mails many times a day so I can be in contact with you all the time. My language pairs are English <> French. I am a specialist English to French translator, native French speaker, qualified with Master of Arts (M.A) inTranslation Specialized Translation (Economics, Business, IT and Localization). I specialize in marketing, tourism, business, economics, IT and localization but will also consider offers in other fields. The hallmark of mytranslations is accuracy, combined with a prompt, reliable and friendly service .
    78. 78. Opening paragraph • I came across an article about your company in XXX website. From research on your website and looking at the marketplace, I am sure of a couple of things. First, yours is the kind of company that I want to be associated with, and second, I have the skills that you can use. • Staying current in our industry is tough because it changes so rapidly and many professionals find it hard to keep up. I am someone who keeps up with those changes, and I hope that you would like to connect so that we can talk about how I can help you reach your global markets. • I read your advertisement in the Daily News on May 17 and, after researching your organization, I think that I have something to offer you. • Your May 17th article in Multilingual Magazine caught my attention, and your company name caught my eye.
    79. 79. Get their attention • If you are looking for someone who can reach the French culture in a cost and time effective way, I can help you by communicating continental French to your stakeholders. • If you still have a need in this area, my resume demonstrates my dedication and commitment to what I do. • I have 15 years experience in the translation industry, built on a degree from the Translation Institute of France. My background has enabled me to consistently identify and implement the right technology, tools and approach to close the communication gap in French in your prestigious organization.
    80. 80. Follow up with an action statement • Available for hire • Link to online portfolio or • Availability for an interview
    81. 81. Wrap It Up • Close with "Sincerely" • Type out your first and last name, • Add your contact information below. • Include your phone number(s), email address, your web page (if applicable) or electronic portfolio URL. • Include your LinkedIn profile vanity URL. • If you have a blog, make sure you include the URL to it, too.
    82. 82. 6. Accomplishments • Major T/I career accomplishments to date • Branded to match resume • Comprehensive examples
    83. 83. 7. Work Samples • Copies of translated material you are proud of (source and target) • Client confidentiality protected • YouTube video
    84. 84. ECSPlus Smart Translation ! ! ! ! ! Translation Process: ! Translated texts filed in database to be reused ! 27% of total word count was efficiently reused ! No need for retranslation and rework ! Timely delivery Costs: ! Actual costs $14,248 ! Savings of $34,759 ! 59% total savings on translation costs **Disclaimer: The name of the Financial Institution in this Case Study has been removed for reasons of confidentiality and proprietary information. 11/4/2013 Marcela Jenney Page 2
    85. 85. 8. Research, Publications, and Reports • Blog • Articles • List of sites where you or your work appears on the Internet
    86. 86. 9. Testimonials and/or Letters of Recommendation Create a ―brag book‖ of: • Recommendations • Testimonials • Performance appraisals • Promotions • Letters of recommendation
    87. 87. 10. Awards and Honors • Awards • Trophies • Contests • Scholarships
    88. 88. 11. Conferences and Workshops • Conferences • Seminars • Training sessions • Workshops • Leadership activities
    89. 89. 12. Degrees, Licenses, and Certifications • Diplomas • Certifications John Doe
    90. 90. 13. Professional Development Activities • Professional organizations you belong to • Details of any of their activities in which you have played a key role
    91. 91. 14. Volunteering/Community Service • Describe activities • Your role
    92. 92. Digital Portfolio/ Personal Website
    93. 93. Why should it be online?
    94. 94. Google is your biggest promoter!
    95. 95. If you’re not in Google, you don’t exist.
    96. 96. Available anytime, anywhere
    97. 97. Tools to create Online Portfolios
    98. 98. Wordpress • No programming required • Easy to make frequent updates • Automatic posting of your content to Google’s search index • Very simple to setup! • Google ―portfolio wordpress themes‖
    99. 99. Google Sites
    100. 100. Vizualize.me
    101. 101. Cvgram.me
    102. 102. Personal Portals • About.me • Flavors.me
    103. 103. Summary  Provides professional way to showcase your work  Creates great first impression for translation and interpretation agencies/clients  Increases your visibility and online presence  Shows you’re more than just a resume  Offers flexibility
    104. 104. Q&A
    105. 105. 114
    106. 106. marcela@latitudescoach.com MarcelaJenney marcelareyes latitudescoachblog.com www.latitudescoach.com mjenney
    107. 107. • Providing the training, tools and expertise to help you grow your language business! • Latitudescoach.com

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