Leading Change: Top Tech Trends and How to Lead Your Organization Through Them

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Holly Ross, Executive Director of NTEN, presents Leading Change: Top Tech Trends and How to Lead Your Organization Through Them at Lasa's Powering Up The Third Sector Technology Conference at IBM …

Holly Ross, Executive Director of NTEN, presents Leading Change: Top Tech Trends and How to Lead Your Organization Through Them at Lasa's Powering Up The Third Sector Technology Conference at IBM Forum London, 14 November 2011

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  • How long have you been in this field of work? Raise your hand if you’ve been doing this work for 5 years. Keep them raised if you’ve been doing it for 10 years. 20 years? Now raise your hand if, in all the time you’ve been doing this work, you feel like you’re closer to the solution than when you started.
  • Credit – Ed Granger-Happ, Save the ChildrenExplain pyramid – where does your tech staff spend most of their time?If we are going to move our Technology investments- staff, time, and money-toward actually meeting our mission, we’re going to have to think about how we get things done a little bit differently. That means change. Raise your hand if you love change. Exactly. For most of us change is extremely uncomfortable. And time consuming. Part of getting a lot of good work done is knowing exactly how you will do it! But I promise, a little discomfort will have a good long-term payoff for you. All you have to do is, in the immortal words of my mother in law…
  • Flickr Photo by MichaelMarriatt: http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaelmarlatt/3151591960/In every way, cloud computing helps you align your interests toward the top of that pyramid.
  • Cloud Image: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kky/704056791/sizes/o/The Gartner definition of the cloud. Let’s break it down.
  • Credit – Ed Granger-Happ, Save the Children It means you can spend a lot more time contemplating the top of the pyramid, a lot more time using technology to meet your mission rather than support it.
  • Credit – Ed Granger-Happ, Save the ChildrenIn short, the cloud helps you spend more time meeting your mission.
  • Hug Flickr Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/clover_1/4861811309/sizes/l/in/photostream/Dandelion Flickr Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/courosa/3708151311/sizes/l/in/photostream/Almost everything we do as human beings is driven by the need to be social, to make emotional connections. That’s certainly what our work is about. That has been the constant. We do this work because we care about the people in our communities. People support our work because they care about their communities. Doing and supporting the work is a way for us to communicate that emotion, share it with others, and get them engaged.
  • Flickr Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ben_grey/4582294721/sizes/l/in/photostream/Social happens because we share. It’s those bits and pieces that we share with one another – the restaurant reviews, pictures of cousins, relationship status – those keep us connected in meaningful ways. That’s why social media is so compelling. It allows all of to share, be heard, and be a part of other people’s lives. Although, let’s face it. Who hasn’t thought, at least once, that there’s a not so fine line between sharing...
  • Source: http://facebookovershare.wordpress.com/page/2/… and oversharing.
  • But I still contend, that among all the silly status updates, there’s something very important going on here.
  • Source: http://www.facebook.com/press/info.php?statistics
  • Source: http://www.facebook.com/press/info.php?statistics
  • Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/14/twitter-user-statistics_n_835581.html
  • Source: http://www.causes.com/aboutWe’re raising money through social media. Causes, arguably the biggest fundraising app for Facebook, has raised over $30 million for over 25,000 nonprofits. Sure, that’s only about $1200 per nonprofit, but the signs are there. People are in fact making it happen.
  • Source: twitter.com/tudiabetesWe use these tools to build real community. Look at all the ways Manny is making and strengthening connections through his Twitter account.
  • Flickr photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/takver/5415216249/sizes/l/in/photostream/And, like all communications technology, it’s played an important role in making revolution.
  • But none of these things happen in the social space because of careful brand management . They don’t happen because we so carefully craft our message and send it out into the world.
  • Flickr photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ausnahmezustand/4752989186/
  • Transparency: http://www.flickr.com/photos/blancetbella/3088594453/sizes/l/Authenticity: http://www.flickr.com/photos/patricklanigan/4182902199/Reciprocity: http://www.flickr.com/photos/67769880@N00/3262094857/sizes/l/in/photostream/What motivates people isn’t
  • How many of you are engaged in collaboration right now? How many of you got grant money that required a collaboration?Funders love it, this economy almost demands it, and it’s actually good for us! You can’t end hunger by feeding people. You end hunger by making sure that people a) are fed b) can feed themselves. This requires that organizations with particular specialties work together to deliver services across their client bases in a cohesive way. That requires collaboration.And increasingly, we’re seeing departments WITHIN organizations feeling the collaborative vibe. The introduction of social media to the marketing mix has really started to blur the line between marketing, program and fundraising. Several large organizations are rethinking their org chart and placing marketing people within different departments. And we see hundreds more holding many more cross-departmental meetings.
  • Flickr photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/manzabar/161450241/sizes/z/in/photostream/There are a lot of stumbling blocks to sharing and collaboration. Most of them require a psychologist to discuss properly, right? Because the hardest part about collaborating Is finding the will and the trust to do it. However, just a few short years ago, you could want collaboration like crazy and it still wouldn’t have been very possible in many ways. That’s because just a few short years ago, the actual act of collaborating was much harder.You had to get people in a room with flip charts and markers. You had to get your IT guy to write the query to get the data that you had to burn on to a CD. You had to wade through 10,000 track changes on a word doc and never really know what the latest draft ACTUALLY looked like.Technology has made that part of collaborating MUCH easier. Where there is a will, there is now a way. And we’re seeing much more collaboration in return. We can use wikis or online apps like Google Docs or Microsoft Live to share draft documents, share our resources, etc. And it’s all much more manageable than before. The data in our systems can get out MUCH easier, and we can send it other places via the magic of the interwebs. Unified and mobile communications means that we can all meet together, from every corner of the world, in pretty meaningful ways.But there are downsides. Collaboration tends to drive up email and other e-communications exponentially. That doesn’t help our information overload. And there are security risks. The more people that you let through the front gate, the more likely something bad will happen. Wikis are not secure (ish). Are they safer than Twitter? Probably. Are they as easy to secure as paper? No. But then again, you’re probably not really securing your important papers well enough either.
  • Technology has made that part of collaborating MUCH easier. Where there is a will, there is now a way. And we’re seeing much more collaboration in return. We can use wikis or online apps like Google Docs or Microsoft Live to share draft documents, share our resources, etc. And it’s all much more manageable than before. The data in our systems can get out MUCH easier, and we can send it other places via the magic of the interwebs. Unified and mobile communications means that we can all meet together, from every corner of the world, in pretty meaningful ways.But there are downsides. Collaboration tends to drive up email and other e-communications exponentially. That doesn’t help our information overload. And there are security risks. The more people that you let through the front gate, the more likely something bad will happen. Wikis are not secure (ish). Are they safer than Twitter? Probably. Are they as easy to secure as paper? No. But then again, you’re probably not really securing your important papers well enough either.
  • Webconference Flickr photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tessawatson/446276065/iPhone Flickr photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kengo/5305464735/sizes/l/in/photostream/Unified and mobile communications means that we can all meet together, from every corner of the world, in pretty meaningful ways.But there are downsides. Collaboration tends to drive up email and other e-communications exponentially. That doesn’t help our information overload. And there are security risks. The more people that you let through the front gate, the more likely something bad will happen. Online docs are not secure (ish). Are they safer than Twitter? Probably. Are they as easy to secure as paper? No. But then again, you’re probably not really securing your important papers well enough either.
  • One thing I want to stress here is that data is our most important asset. All by itself our data paints a picture of where we are – like in this dashboard. It’s the stuff that tells us how we’re doing and what we need to keep working at. In short, it helps us understand our own work better.
  • Site: Everyblock.comUse data to contextualize your work.
  • Source: Information is BeautifulUse Data to Tell Stories for our stakeholders
  • Source: http://www.visitmix.com/work/descry/theobesityepidemic/Use Data to Tell Stories for our stakeholders
  • Source: http://countysinrankings.org/Use Data to Tell Stories for our stakeholders
  • Source: http://countysinrankings.org/Use Data to Tell Stories for our stakeholders
  • Source: data.worldbank.gov
  • Source: http://www.austinfoodbank.org/hunger-is-unacceptable/hunger-maps.html
  • How many of you are engaged in collaboration right now? How many of you got grant money that required a collaboration?Funders love it, this economy almost demands it, and it’s actually good for us! You can’t end hunger by feeding people. You end hunger by making sure that people a) are fed b) can feed themselves. This requires that organizations with particular specialties work together to deliver services across their client bases in a cohesive way. That requires collaboration.And increasingly, we’re seeing departments WITHIN organizations feeling the collaborative vibe. The introduction of social media to the marketing mix has really started to blur the line between marketing, program and fundraising. Several large organizations are rethinking their org chart and placing marketing people within different departments. And we see hundreds more holding many more cross-departmental meetings.
  • Photo:http://innovation.hindustantimes.com/assets_c/2010/06/godreg1-thumb-600xauto-307.jpgAny guesses what this is?
  • Image: http://www.indicus.net/Newsletter/images/dec-india-map.JPG 5,000 to 8,000 rupees a month ($125 to $200) Single room dwellings with up to 5 or 6 people No refrigerators of their own: communal if lucky, usually second hand
  • Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/for_tea_too/2432486237/sizes/l/in/photostream/Other companies entering the market tended to design this. Their approach to the low-income market was to focus on price alone. How can we make a product cheap enough to make is affordable for the low-end of the market?
  • Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/milaap/4681736928/sizes/l/in/photostream/Godrej – Chotukool.1.5 by 2 feet, 43 litersTop-opening design keeps cool air in longerSize and interior are designed for the kinds of items people wanted to store – just a few things at a time, not a week’s worth of groceriesHas only 20 parts, instead of 200. No coolant, cooling tools or compressor. It runs off the same kind of fan that keeps your computer cool, which means that it can also run on a battery when the power goes out, as it frequently does.It’s the right sizeIt’s portableIt meets power needsNo other refrigerator on the market does that.Of course, I am not suggesting that you get into the business of refrigerator design. But I am asking you to re-imagine solutions to the problems we are all trying to solve and use technology to meet those needs. Don’t accept the status quo – for anything.
  • Source: http://rucksack.iava.org/
  • Source: DoSomething.org
  • Now is not the time to be scared. Now is the time to leap forward and try things we never thought we could. Because things we never thought possible are becoming just that.

Transcript

  • 1. LEADING CHANGE:Top Trends and How to Lead Your Organization Through Them
  • 2. Can Technology Change the World? The fact is that if positively changing peoples’ lives and condition in [their] community was directly correlated to the number of nonprofits in this country, we would have made a hell of a lot more progress over the last 10 years than we did. Brian Gallagher, United Way
  • 3. Yes, It Can
  • 4. LET GOcloud
  • 5. Efficiency vs. Effectiveness
  • 6. Get Over It. - Mari Blacker
  • 7. What is Cloud Computing? RESPONSIVE VENDORS LEVELS THECREATES PLAYINGEFFICIENCIES FIELD http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaelmarlatt/3151591960/ GOOD FOR THE EARTH
  • 8. The Technical DefinitionA style of computing where scalable and elastic IT- related capabilities are provided as a service to external customers using Internet technologies - GartnerService basedScalable and ElasticSharedMeteredDelivered via Internet http://www.flickr.com/photos/kky/704056791/sizes/o/
  • 9. Efficiency vs. Effectiveness
  • 10. Efficiency vs. Effectiveness
  • 11. MOTIVATEsocial
  • 12. MOTIVATE: Get Social
  • 13. MOTIVATE: Get Social
  • 14. MOTIVATE: Get Social
  • 15. Motivate: Get Social
  • 16. Motivate: Get Social Average number of content pieces a Facebook user creates each month 90
  • 17. Motivate: Get Social Number of minutes spent per month on Facebook (in billions) 700
  • 18. Motivate: Get Social Average number of tweets per day (in millions 140
  • 19. MOTIVATE: Get Social
  • 20. MOTIVATE: Get Social
  • 21. MOTIVATE: Get Social
  • 22. MOTIVATE: Get Social Brand Management
  • 23. MOTIVATE: Get Social
  • 24. MOTIVATE: Get Social
  • 25. MOTIVATE: Get Social
  • 26. COLLABORATEdata
  • 27. COLLABORATE: Set Your Data Free
  • 28. COLLABOATE: Set Your Data Free
  • 29. COLLABORATE: Set Your Data Free
  • 30. COLLABORATE: Set Your Data Free
  • 31. COLLABORATE: Set Your Data Free
  • 32. COLLABORATE: Set Your Data Free
  • 33. COLLABORATE: Set Your Data Free
  • 34. COLLABORATE: Set Your Data Free
  • 35. COLLABORATE: Set Your Data Free
  • 36. COLLABORATE: Set Your Data Free
  • 37. COLLABORATE: Set Your Data Free
  • 38. INSPIREre-invent
  • 39. INSPIRE: Re-invent
  • 40. INSPIRE: Re-invent
  • 41. INSPIRE: Re-invent
  • 42. INSPIRE: Re-invent
  • 43. INSPIRE: Re-invent
  • 44. INSPIRE: Re-invent
  • 45. INSPIRE: Re-invent
  • 46. INSPIRE: Re-invent