PR 101 - Communications for Startups and Entrepreneurs
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PR 101 - Communications for Startups and Entrepreneurs

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1) How to tell your story and why anybody should actually listen

1) How to tell your story and why anybody should actually listen
2) Knowing your audiences is everything
3) Social media isn't the holy grail - are you sure you wanna go viral

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PR 101 - Communications for Startups and Entrepreneurs PR 101 - Communications for Startups and Entrepreneurs Presentation Transcript

  • Lars Voedisch Principal Consultantlars@preciouscomms.com
  • All glamorous? Entertain clients… with booze?
  • Video: Street Interview
  • Building or maintaining an organization’s relations with its various publics(groups of people who are important to it)
  • • Two- way communication.• More cost effective as compared to other forms of communication.• Perception of an impartial opinion and reviewed in the media.• Essential tool in business growth.• Reputation and credibility as important as product and support.• Messaging helps to position the company/brand/products, conveying its key attributes and value proposition. Important! Your message to your target audience
  • 1. The idea behind the story conveyed in a few words.2. Communicating your story.3. Graft powerful words together that pique emotion, stimulate a need, elicit a vision, and produce engagement.4. Deliver the right content at the right time.5. Share your content on multiple social networks.6. Be honest with your supporters.
  • Curiosity Motivation Against the odds• Content that reveals • Content that reminds us • David vs Goliath. secrets. that dreams can come• E.g.: Product leaks. true. Small is beautiful, Affirmation Sensationalism big is advantage • Content that confirms • Content with• Content that reminds us our assumption. unexpected twist. what we do matters. Feel good story New discovery Transformation• Content that tells a • Content that challenges • Content that inspires us great story. our discovery. to action.
  • Case Study: Ford MotorLet fans tell your story• Found that fans wanted to share their own stories of ways they would connect with the brand. Focused on customer stories.Rethink how you share news• Launched the model in several U.S. cities and online with the help of its fans.Share content everywhere you can• Produced tie-in content on other platforms to help the series reach a wider audience.Be willing to experiment and learn from mistakes• Importance of keeping campaigns simple and giving fans a venue for being part of something larger than themselves.
  • • Connects people, and gets people engaged and interested.• Brings real personality to what it is you do.• Brings your business alive. What is essential to know? What How How can one benefit from your story (or product) Why Why should people care? Adapted from: The Golden Circle by Simon Sinek
  • Who What How• Customers • Age • Choice of words• Potential • Gender • Use of jargons and customers • Occupation or technical terms• Suppliers qualification • Tone• Advertisers • Geography • Focus• Media • Socio-economic • The design and feel• Financial bodies group of the• Regulatory and • Family structure communication government bodies • Lifestyle • The medium used• Industry groups and other networks
  • Learning about your audience by looking at their social media life How Do They Describe Themselves? • Bios on their social networks. • Deeper look into the things that they value most highly about themselves. When Are They Most Socially Active? • Best time to post. Whom Do They Listen To? • For example, rapper 50 Cent, tweeted about a company he’d invested in. His series of tweets bumped up the value of the company he promoted by 240%. What Content Do They Want? • Learn about their interests, dig deeper into the kind of content they want by the networks they favour.
  • Yourself What are you an expert in? What do you want to be known for? Your company As an individual, you can’t scale, but your company can. Your concept If you want to grow your business, as well as yourself as an expert in your industry, then you need to build your concept. Your community Your community is a group of people that support you and your company.Source: http://blog.rockthepost.com/?p=3524
  • • Key ingredient for business success still a product or service that uniquely fulfils the needs of the end user.• May result in negative comments from employees about the company or potential legal consequences if employees use these sites to view objectionable, illicit or offensive material.• With great power come great responsibilities. If it is not utilized properly it may cause severe loss to your business. Social media is a very sensitive tool.• Pick up a wrong social media marketing strategy you can end up damaging your brand image and reputation in the market.
  • • Small mistakes are magnified in front of thousands of people.• Worst case: People might not even care!• Can be also recklessly used for hampering the reputation of the organization as well.• Building communities takes a lot of time and efforts – in a situation where’s a growing social media (or more: Facebook) fatique kicking in• In the end: Where is your target audience?
  • Practically useful, surprising, and Content that inspires high-energy interesting emotions far more likely to be shared. More likely to be shared
  • Content with an Fame of the author emotional tone • Slightly more important than content Humour• 62% of ads being aired by Fortune 500 companies, 60% of viral ads were being generated by the smaller companies.• “Humour was employed at near unanimous levels for all viral advertisements. Consequently, this study identified humour as the universal appeal for making content viral.”
  • Content with an Fame of the author emotional tone • Slightly more important than content Humour or Ridicule!• 62% of ads being aired by Fortune 500 companies, 60% of viral ads were being generated by the smaller companies.• “Humour was employed at near unanimous levels for all viral advertisements. Consequently, this study identified humour as the universal appeal for making content viral.”
  • Content with an Fame of the author emotional tone • Slightly more important than content•• or 62% of ads being aired by Fortune 500 companies, 60% of Humour viral ads were being generated by the smaller companies. “Humour was employed at near unanimous levels for all viral advertisements. Consequently, this study identified Ridicule! humour as the universal appeal for making content viral.”
  • Viral video. Viral mistake. Viral opportunity?Who’s seeing your content?• If your content goes viral, find a way to harness this new audience.Can there be too much of a good thing?• Best-case opportunity can become worst-case scenario.• Plan ahead and understand how your website can handle more visits.Can your reputation stand the attention?• If people have misconstrued or parodied your message, how do you rectify?How will you handle the unexpected?• Unpredictable digital marketplace.• A leaked video or telephone conversation can blow up into a PR disaster (or opportunity).• No one can control viral content.
  • • Know your story (elevator pitch)• Have a simple PR kit – Corporate background, product factsheet, executive biographies• Follow your competitors - allows you to see what they are doing, as they do it, as well as keeps you up-to-date on their progress, ideas, updates, and more!• More than just Facebook “likes” or media clips - brand must drive marketing value and not merely be seen.• Have a plan – and if it is trial & error. Accept defeat at certain points and move on.
  • • Forgetting to ask why people should actually care.• Social isn’t the place for the hard sell or self- promotion.• You don’t have to be everywhere.• You don’t have to keep up with the big brands. You can’t. Accept it!• Social Media isn’t “Free”, it takes a loooot of time which may need for other things.• Not knowing who and where your audience is.• Not planning or having clear objectives. What do you want to achieve?• Not using the tools to analyze what you are doing.• Keeping momentum beyond the first buzz.
  • Do’s Don’tsBe a relationship builder and Be inappropriate show me that you care Be respectful of others’ opinions even if you don’t Sell straight off agree with themBe on-brand and mindful ofthe online footprint you’re Promote yourself creating Be a ‘giver’ and not only a Use me ‘taker’Be honest in all your business Be impersonal or rude dealings
  • • Take 5 minutes and define what you want to be for your key stakeholders• For each stakeholder group, think of maximum 3 key messages!• Practice and refine. Then do it again.• If in doubt, you have questions or feel like having a coffee or beer – call us!
  • PReciousSparks Cooperation ModelA structured programme designed for start-ups to address communication challenges toachieve their communication and business objectives. Depending on the level of maturity andgrowth stage, start-ups can be confronted by one or more of the following problems:1. Media Mentions Stakeholder2. Digital Engagement Credibility (assessing the3. Reputation Gap reputation gap) A market misconception or image Stakeholders misalignment exists for the brand Engagement Low engagement levels of the brand with its audience on the digital and One directional social media platforms message delivery (concise, consistent, The brand is not well received by the credible) media with lower media coverage as opposed to its immediate competitors.32
  • Consultation Framework Freemium Initial Consultation Full Market Research Free Tools on the Website Initial Background Analysis Competitive Analysis Free Quick Help Kit on the Brief Message Structure Market & Customer Research Website Quick Strategies & Tactics Industry Trend Analysis Messaging Workshop Project Proposal Retainer Proposal Full Research Presentation Strategy and Tactics for Awareness Sustainable PR Yearly Plan Message House Development Campaign or Product Launch Key Deliverables Outlined Proposed Initial Strategies1. The freemium and consultation provides basic communication tool kit and advice for start-ups as an initial stage of PRecious Sparks2. Our research insights provide a guided approach in advising start up on a systematic strategies and tactics with an initial project collaboration3. The last stage concludes with an annual partnership with a detailed PR Plan for quarterly performance reviews.33
  • Your Reputation is PRecious Brand perceptions are shifting as you read. Customers are demanding a more human approach to communication. Where are you? Social media requires your attention 24/7. The media landscape is fast changing and eroding.We provide :Communications Strategy | Traditional & Social Media RelationsDigital Engagement | Crisis Preparedness & ManagementInternal Communications | Media TrainingAnalysis, Measurement, Research 35
  • About PRecious CommunicationsInternational Communications Expertise with a Passion for Technology• PRecious Communications is a young and energetic, yet strategic communications and public relations consultancy serving B2C and B2B companies• Our focus is on corporate communications, crisis management, public relations and social media.• It combines a clear business-oriented approach with a focus on measurable results that tie directly into its clients’ overall communications objectives.• The firm is run out of Singapore and serves clients throughout Asia Pacific.• PRecious was officially started in early 2012 by Lars Voedisch, an experienced global communications and business professional with 15 years expertise in growing, managing and defending leading global brands’ reputation across industry sectors.Background & Expertise• Combined work experience: AIESEC, AT&T, Australian Crime Commission, CA Technologies, Chugai, Citi, Coca Cola, DBS, DHL, Dow Jones, EDS, Fidelity, FireEye, Government of Singapore Investment Corporation (GIC), Honda, HP, Huawei, ING, InMobi, JLL, Lend Lease, Lenovo, LG, Macquarie Bank, MEC, Motorola, Naturalis, OpenNet, Palm, Panasonic, Porsche, Procter & Gamble, Sabic, Standard Chartered Bank, Tata Communications, Telstra, TNS, Yahoo!, Yamaha, Venetian Macao, VMware, Zardoze
  • About Us…• Independent, boutique communications consultancy• Based out of Singapore, at home in Asia and Europe• Globally connected via affiliation with +65 - 9170 2470 connect@preciouscomms.com larsvoed Facebook.com/PReciousComms 229 Mountbatten Road Twitter.com/PReciousComms #02-41 Mountbatten Square Singapore 398007
  • PRecious PartnersSome of the brands PRecious Communications and our consultants have worked with