smAlbany 2013 gn bdr pp

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smAlbany 2013 gn bdr pp

  1. 1. “Irene, Sandy, Tornadoes, Oh My! How to make sure your business can survive!”
  2. 2. Meet Lauren • Needed a “Real” Job • 3 ‘Down-sizes’ in a 5 year span • 2005 Groff NetWorks was born • 8 years later: 8 employees and dedicated to 35 companies.
  3. 3. Introductions • Tell us who you are and where you are from. • What is the one thing you would like to learn during today’s seminar?
  4. 4. Partnerships
  5. 5. What are we talking about? “Irene, Sandy, Tornadoes, Oh My! How to make sure your business can survive!”
  6. 6. What you will learn today • The differences between Backup, Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity • Types of disasters, their frequency and severity • Why you should be afraid…very afraid • The easiest way to insure your data isn’t lost • How to put your backup on autopilot with complete confidence that it works
  7. 7. SANDY
  8. 8. What’s the goal? • Make sure you never lose critical data • Minimize downtime • Recover as quickly as possible in the event of a disaster
  9. 9. Why is this important? • Of companies experiencing a major loss of data • 25% to 43% never reopen • 51% close within two years of the loss • A mere 6% survived over the long term
  10. 10. Why is this important? • Small businesses account for • More than 99% of companies with employees • 50% of all private sector workers • Nearly 45% of the nation’s payroll • Commitment to planning today will help support employees, customers, the community, the local economy and the country
  11. 11. Business Continuity . . . An ongoing process to ensure that the necessary steps are taken to identify the impact of potential losses and maintain viable recovery strategies, recovery plans, and continuity of services.
  12. 12. Special Guest • Geoff Turner, Tech Valley Continuity
  13. 13. What is Business Continuity Planning? Ongoing process designed to eliminate or mitigate the negative impact of events that disrupt normal business activities.
  14. 14. NYS Disaster Declarations Since 2002 Disaster Type Count Earthquake 1 Ice Storm 1 Power Outage 1 Severe Storms and Flooding 12 Severe Winter Storm 8 Tropical Storm / Hurricane 5 Tornadoes / High Winds 3 Grand Total 31
  15. 15. Most Disasters Are Not “DISASTERS” • Power Outages • Computer Failure • Telephone Outages • Water Pipe Leakage • Facility Fire • Information Breach • Supply Chain Issues
  16. 16. NYS Information Breaches 2005-2012 • NYS = 11.4% of U.S. Breaches 20% Lost or Stolen Laptops 12% Unintentional Disclosure 12% Lost or Stolen Paper Documents 10% Stolen PCs or Hard Drives 10% Hacking 8% Insider Release of Information
  17. 17. Symphony of Multiple Plans • Emergency Response Plan • Incident Management Plan • Mutual Aid / Assistance • Business Recovery Plan • Business Reconstitution Plan • Communications Plan • Logistics Plan • Training / TESTING / Evaluation Plan Source: Microsoft
  18. 18. General Continuity Planning Process • Form a Senior Management Team • Form a Business Continuity Planning Team • Assess Risks / Impacts • Design Solutions • Implement Solutions • Document Recovery Strategies • Train Recovery Teams • TEST – TEST - TEST
  19. 19. Areas of Focus • Information Technology • Primary Mission Essential Functions • Key Staff and Vendors • Vital Records and Resources • Alternate Facilities: – People – Computer Systems • Telecommunications: Data and Voice • Notification to clients, employees, stakeholders
  20. 20. Business Continuity Planning • Most Companies Start With: • Protecting their data and technology infrastructure
  21. 21. Not Just About IT Issues • Plan for immediate disaster response – including safety of employees • Identification of critical processes • Review insurance coverage • Disaster prevention • Key suppliers/service providers.
  22. 22. Where to Begin? • Vulnerability Assessment • Probability • Potential Impact • List potential threats considering • History • Geography • Technology • Building Characteristics
  23. 23. Human Errors • Unintentional actions taken by managers and employees acting in good faith • Most common causes • Inadequate user training • Fatigue • Carelessness
  24. 24. Equipment Failures • Malfunction or complete failure of office machinery • Servers • Desktops or laptops • Fax machines • Phone systems • Network components • Expect this type of failure at some time
  25. 25. Third-Party Failures • Service delivery failures • Electrical power • Phone service • Internet service • Financial disasters • Default of large customer • FDIC bank closure
  26. 26. Environmental Hazards • Denial of access due to • Smoke from nearby fire • Hazardous substances in building • Irritants such as • Fresh paint • Radioactive, biological or chemical substances
  27. 27. Fires and Other Disasters • Natural events • Earthquakes • Tornados, floods and storms • Man-made disasters • Gas leaks • Water pipe leaks
  28. 28. Joplin
  29. 29. Albany
  30. 30. Other Natural Disasters • A close call for a lot of people • What if this one hit?
  31. 31. Terrorism and Sabotage • Intentional, systematic, planned and organized • Based on malicious intent • Possibility of very concentrated damage with relatively little effort • Perpetrated by • Terrorists • Computer hackers • Disgruntled employees
  32. 32. Understand Your Risks Groff NetWorks-11 State Street, Troy NY
  33. 33. Evaluate Each Disaster Based on - • Probability of occurrence • Impact • Human - possibility of death or injury • Property – cost of repair/replacement • Business – potential interruption of operation • Ability to respond • Internal resources • External resources
  34. 34. Vulnerability Assessment 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Probability Impact
  35. 35. Key Concepts • Recovery Time Objective – RTO • How long can your business survive before you have to be operational to remain in business? • Recovery Point Objective – RPO • How old can your data be and still have value?
  36. 36. Disaster Timeline 14 days 7 days 2 days 1 hour 1 day 2 days
  37. 37. Disaster Recovery . . . Is the process, policies and procedures of restoring operations critical to the resumption of business after a disaster.
  38. 38. Backup • Copying your data to a safe medium for recovery in the event of data loss due to disaster • Protection from some disasters, like fire or flood, requires two-step backup • Backup (locally) • Transfer (off-site)
  39. 39. Traditional Backup Methodology • Backup is performed nightly • Someone must remove the media and replace it with tonight’s media • Two-step backup accomplished by ‘sneakernet’ • Relies on your staff to make sure that backup is working • Single snapshot per day
  40. 40. Backup to Tape • Slow • Media degrades over time and is greatly affected by the environment • Tape drive is expensive • Additional capacity is difficult to add • Formats are typically proprietary – must have same type of drive and same software to restore
  41. 41. Move to Disk Based Backup Removable Hard Drives • Backup and restore times are much faster • Capacity is easily increased • Solutions may use standard Windows file systems • Still requires user interaction • Not as convenient to carry offsite
  42. 42. Offsite Backup • Does not require user interaction • Capacity easily increased • Automated BUT… • Data only • Slow recovery times
  43. 43. Here’s the problem… We think a good backup is good enough.
  44. 44. Criteria For A Solid Backup System • Take the human element out of the equation • Make sure ALL files are backed up • Automated and easy • Intra-day backups • No impact on day-to-day operations • Fast restores – and to dissimilar hardware
  45. 45. Criteria For Off-Site Backup • Secure data transfer • Secure data storage • Ability to receive data overnight • Ability to send initial backup on hard drive • Geographically separate from you • Low cost off-site storage • Regulatory compliance – HIPAA, SOX, GLBA
  46. 46. Questions to ask • How much revenue, gross AND net, do you generate? • How many employees do you have, what is their cost? • How much of that is facilitated, or even dependent, on your IT infrastructure?
  47. 47. Questions to ask • How will a failure – even a short lived failure – be perceived by your customers and your employees? • How quickly can you recover lost files? • If a server fails, how long will it be before you are back up and running…how much opportunity cost would this represent?
  48. 48. Could you survive . . . ?
  49. 49. Could you survive . . . ? • I think she may be getting fired for this!
  50. 50. Does your backup do this? • Meets multiple regulatory requirements • Addresses the BC, DR and B • Utilizes Server hardware
  51. 51. 8 Reasons Why You Need To Replace Your Current Backup 1. Near Real-Time Backups – – As frequently as every 15 minutes 2. Complete Image – – Backs up your entire server including open files 3. Restores that are Intuitive, Flexible and Fast
  52. 52. 8 Reasons Why You Need To Replace Your Current Backup 4. Secure Bandwidth Throttling Transfer 5. Secure Remote Storage 6. Monitored and Verified 24x7
  53. 53. 8 Reasons Why You Need To Replace Your Current Backup 7. Virtualization • Server Fails • NAS Virtualizes Server • One hour or less • No reconfiguration necessary • Backups Continue
  54. 54. 8 Reasons Why You Need To Replace Your Current Backup 8. Overnight Disaster Recovery • Replacement appliance delivered with most recent off-site image(s) of your server(s) • Business can be back up and running within 24 hours • And, now with Cloud server failover, you could be running in the matter of hours if you were to lose your facility!
  55. 55. How it works
  56. 56. Our Clients. . . • “The Arsenal Partnership is very pleased with Groff NetWorks. Groff NetWorks’ staff is very helpful and the technicians are extremely knowledgeable. Their quick response to address our various IT requests has been refreshing.” – Doreen Dean, Administrative Assistant, Arsenal Business & Technology Partnership
  57. 57. Our Clients. . . “Groff NetWorks is prompt, friendly, and most importantly, honest. They really do a great job.” - Donna Gutzwiller, Office Manager, Audio Visual Sales & Service
  58. 58. Questions?

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