How to read like a writer                      by Mike BunnCarolina, Gabriel, Larissa, Marcela and ThaísAcademic Writing -...
Introduction
Consider:• Connections between reading and writing;• Reading in a particular way improves  writing.
Definitions and objectives
Reading like a writer (RLW) is...• Reading critic and consciously;• Identifying the authors choices;• Assessing those choi...
The main idea of RLW is...• To keep in mind that you are reading to  understand how the text was written.       Writing   ...
Objective "Reading to learn about writing" (p. 72), that   is, "to locate what you believe are the mostimportant writerly ...
Objective
Differences about RLW
Differences from "normal" reading• Purposes:  o   "Normal" reading: acquire information;  o   RLW: identify, analyse and a...
Importance
Why to Read Like a Writer?• Opportunity to think and learn about writing;• Students build knowledge about the process  thr...
Why to Read Like a Writer?•   Charles Moran (1990, p. 75):      “When we read like writers we understand and    participat...
How to read like a writer
Before reading•   Contextual information:• Purpose;• Audience;• Genre;• Published or student-produced;• Objective of the r...
While reading•   Follow-up questions:• Is the authors purpose being fulfilled?• Is the audience being reached?• What in th...
While reading•   Consider:• Language style: link to the audience;• Evidences: appropriation and effectiveness;• Confusing ...
While reading•   Hints on RLW:• Highlight important parts;• Make comments;• Take notes;• Write summaries during and after ...
The importance of practicing• "The more you practice, the quicker the  process becomes until youre reading like  a writer ...
Conclusion
Conclusion "Questioning why the author made certain   decisions. Considering what techniques could have made the text bett...
Other references•   Francine Prose: How to read as a writer.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1j-hHAgIDDw
References
References:•   MORAN, Charles. Reading Like a Writer. Vital    Signs 1, Ed. James L. Collins. Portsmouth,    NH: Boynton/C...
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How to read like a writer

  1. 1. How to read like a writer by Mike BunnCarolina, Gabriel, Larissa, Marcela and ThaísAcademic Writing - 1/2012
  2. 2. Introduction
  3. 3. Consider:• Connections between reading and writing;• Reading in a particular way improves writing.
  4. 4. Definitions and objectives
  5. 5. Reading like a writer (RLW) is...• Reading critic and consciously;• Identifying the authors choices;• Assessing those choices;• Acquiring valuable options.
  6. 6. The main idea of RLW is...• To keep in mind that you are reading to understand how the text was written. Writing Reading
  7. 7. Objective "Reading to learn about writing" (p. 72), that is, "to locate what you believe are the mostimportant writerly choices represented in the text" (p. 72), and to assess them in order to make, or not, use of such constructions in ones own texts.
  8. 8. Objective
  9. 9. Differences about RLW
  10. 10. Differences from "normal" reading• Purposes: o "Normal" reading: acquire information; o RLW: identify, analyse and assess the writing choices made by the author.
  11. 11. Importance
  12. 12. Why to Read Like a Writer?• Opportunity to think and learn about writing;• Students build knowledge about the process through the study of others experiences;• Students improve their writing.
  13. 13. Why to Read Like a Writer?• Charles Moran (1990, p. 75): “When we read like writers we understand and participate in the writing. We see the choices the writer has made, how the writer has coped with the consequences of those choices, (...) what the writer is doing; we have written ourselves and know the territory, know the feeling of it, know some of the moves ourselves.”
  14. 14. How to read like a writer
  15. 15. Before reading• Contextual information:• Purpose;• Audience;• Genre;• Published or student-produced;• Objective of the reading;
  16. 16. While reading• Follow-up questions:• Is the authors purpose being fulfilled?• Is the audience being reached?• What in the text makes you feel and respond the way you do?
  17. 17. While reading• Consider:• Language style: link to the audience;• Evidences: appropriation and effectiveness;• Confusing parts: existence and cause;• Transition strategies: existence and effectiveness.
  18. 18. While reading• Hints on RLW:• Highlight important parts;• Make comments;• Take notes;• Write summaries during and after reading;• Ask yourself follow-up questions;• Ask yourself for possible improvements.
  19. 19. The importance of practicing• "The more you practice, the quicker the process becomes until youre reading like a writer almost automatically" (p. 85).
  20. 20. Conclusion
  21. 21. Conclusion "Questioning why the author made certain decisions. Considering what techniques could have made the text better. Deciding how to include the best attributes of what you read in your own writing. This is what Reading Like a Writer is all about." (p. 85)
  22. 22. Other references• Francine Prose: How to read as a writer.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1j-hHAgIDDw
  23. 23. References
  24. 24. References:• MORAN, Charles. Reading Like a Writer. Vital Signs 1, Ed. James L. Collins. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 1990.• ZEMLIANSKY, Pavel, LOWE, Charles. Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing. Vol 2. Indiana: Parlour Press, 2010.

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