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    Presentation1.sf.3.17.12 blog Presentation1.sf.3.17.12 blog Presentation Transcript

    • The Language Immersion Montessori Classroom
    • hos@imsnc.org Kateri Carver-Akers, PhD International Montessori School www.imsnc.org 2
    • Benefits of Bilingualism Has a positive effect on intellectual growth and enriches and enhances a childs mental development Leaves students with more flexibility in thinking, greater sensitivity to language, and a better ear for listening Improves a childs understanding of his/her native language 3
    • Terms, definitions and models World languages, L2, target language, heritage language, dual language, ESL, FLE, ELE , immersion, bilingual programming.. 4
    • Terms, definitions and models World languages, L2, target language, heritage language, dual language, ESL, FLE, EL* , immersion, bilingual programming, etc… Language Immersion Montessori (LIM) or Montessori Language Immersion 5
    • Terms, definitions and models World languages, L2, target language, heritage language, dual language, ESL, FLE, ELE , immersion, bilingual programming, Language Immersion Montessori (LIM) or Montessori Language Immersion 50/50 , 80/20, 90/10, TWI (Two-way immersion), partial immersion, 1wayI (One way immersion) 6
    • Jakarta, IndonesiaTokyo, Japan 7
    • The Bilingual Montessori School of Paris Founded in 1972, The Bilingual Montessori School of Paris is an international, multicultural, bilingualschool dedicated to guiding and nurturing childrens full development by providing a learning atmosphere that promotes peace,harmony and respect based upon Montessori principles of education.The Bilingual Montessori School of Paris seeks to aid and inspire children of all races, color, creed, nationality and religion.Listen to the child, to the child’s rhythm. Respect our environment, the self, and all of us who make up mankind.~ Barbara Baylor PorterL’Ecole Montessori Bilingue de Paris a été crée en 1972. C’est une école bilingue internationale et multiculturelle. Cette écoles’attache à guider, à prendre soin, et à permettre un développement complet de l’enfant, dans une ambiance d’apprentissage,basée sur le respect, la harmonie et la paix selon la pédagogie Montessori.L’école aide et inspire les enfants de toutes races, culture, religion et nationalité.Ecouter l’enfant, respecter son rythme. Se respecter soi-même et les autres, respecter son environnement etl’ensemble de l’humanité. ~ Barbara Baylor Porter 8
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    • Language Immersion Montessori Of all the Montessori schools in the US, the few schools that have bilingual or immersion programming use:- “Dual teacher language model” 12
    • Language Immersion Montessori Of all the Montessori schools in the US, the few schools that have bilingual or immersion programming use :“Dual teacher language model”There are NO “Dual teacher language” models in all the professional research done in the past 30 years on second language acquisition. 13
    • Why do Montessori Schools use the “Dual Teacher Language” Model?a. Montessori schools clearly know their language development in early child 14
    • Why do Montessori Schools use the “Dual Teacher Language” Model?a. Montessori schools clearly know their language development in early childb. Montessori schools know the models but made a conscious decision to go an alternative direction 15
    • Why do Montessori Schools use the “Dual Teacher Language” Model?a. Montessori schools clearly know their language development in early childb. Montessori schools know the models but made a conscious decision to go an alternative directionc. Montessori schools do not know about language acquisition research or about the various language acquisition models available to choose from 16
    • Why do Montessori Schools use the “Dual Teacher Language” Model?a. Montessori schools clearly know their language development in early childb. Montessori schools know the models but made a conscious decision to go an alternative directionc. Montessori schools do not know about language acquisition research or about the various language acquisition models available to choose fromd. Montessori schools know the models but do not know how to implement their chosen model 17
    • Why do Montessori Schools use the “Dual Teacher Language” Model?a. Montessori schools clearly know their language development in early childb. Montessori schools know the models but made a conscious decision to go an alternative directionc. Montessori schools do not know about language acquisition research or about the various language acquisition models available to choose fromd. Montessori schools know the models but do not know how to implement their chosen modele. Montessori school know the research and desired model but have various constraints: - facility - funding - staffing - solid long term plan for bi-literacy - parent buy-in - fearsf. … 18
    • How do L2 programs choose a model?Desired outcomeStudent population 19
    • Why do Montessori Schools use the “Dual Teacher Language” Model?a. Montessori schools clearly know their language development in early childb. Montessori schools know the models but made a conscious decision to go an alternative directionc. Montessori schools do not know about language acquisition research or about the various language acquisition models available to choose fromd. Montessori schools know the models but do not know how to implement their chosen modele. Montessori school know the research and desired model but have various constraints: - facility - funding - staffing - solid long term plan, ( for bi-literacy), - parent buy-in - fearsf. … 20
    • 9 Elements for Successful LanguageAcquisition Environments & Montessori Environments Differentiation 21
    • 9 Elements for Successful LanguageAcquisition Environments & Montessori Environments Differentiation Highly contextualized and highly interactive environment 22
    • 9 Elements for Successful LanguageAcquisition Environments & Montessori Environments Differentiation Highly contextualized and highly interactive environment Affective Filter 23
    • 9 Elements for Successful LanguageAcquisition Environments & Montessori Environments Differentiation Highly contextualized and highly interactive environment Affective Filter Monitoring 24
    • 9 Elements for Successful LanguageAcquisition Environments & Montessori Environments Differentiation Highly contextualized and highly interactive environment Affective Filter Monitoring Literacy focus and knowledge of grammar 25
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    • A Montessori Journey: 1907-2007 published by NAMTA 31
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    • 9 Elements for Successful LanguageAcquisition Environments & Montessori Environments Differentiation Highly contextualized and highly interactive environment Affective Filter Monitoring Knowledge of grammar and strong literacy Intentional Language L2 teaching strategies 33
    • 9 Elements for Successful LanguageAcquisition Environments & Montessori Environments Differentiation Highly contextualized and highly interactive environment Affective Filter Monitoring Knowledge of grammar and strong literacy Intentional Language ESL or L2 teaching strategies Modeling 34
    • 9 Elements for Successful Language Acquisition Environments & Montessori Environments Differentiation Highly contextualized and highly interactive environment Affective Filter Monitoring Knowledge of grammar and strong literacy Intentional Language ESL or L2 teaching strategies Modeling Cultural Competency 35
    • 1 GREAT Reason why Bilingualism supports the Montessori Philosophy Peace EducationBilingual cultural ambassadorsBilingual cultural diplomacy 36
    • 1 GREAT Reason why Bilingualism supports the Montessori Philosophy Peace EducationBilingual cultural ambassadorsBilingual cultural diplomacy6. Respect and Recognition of Cultural Diversity and Heritage7. Global Intercultural Dialogue8. Justice, Equality and Interdependence9. Protection of Human Rights10.Peace and Stability 37
    • Language Immersion Montessori MONTESSORI LANGUAGE ACQUISITION 38
    • Elementary Language Immersion Montessori 80/20 immersion model
    • The ‘How-to’ of LIM Program development Characteristics of successful immersion programs Language Immersion Montessori teachers Target Language usage and best practices in a LIM Parent Education Materials Measuring Outcomes 40
    • Program development- over 6 yrs. Avg. Total # 7 14 22 7 returning Lower Elementary 3rd years 6-9 yr olds 7 returning 7 returning 2nd years 2nd years Prep 6-8 7-8 8 Space & rising 1st rising 1st rising 1st Materials yrs. yrs. yrs. Program Dir. yr. 1 PT ; yrs 2-3 FT STAFFING PT English Teacher PT Music / P.E./ Art 6 months Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Lead -FT 1 Lead 1 Lead 1 LeadAvg. Total # 9 16 24 1 Assnt 1 Assnt 6.5 to 9.5 Primary Classroom hrs 3-6 yr. olds Prep 8 to 10 6 to 8 3 8 3 Space & 2.5 - 3 yr. yr. olds yr. olds Materials olds 3 months Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6Lead -PT 1 Lead 1 Lead 1 Lead 1 Assnt 1 Assnt 3 Assnts Staffing 3.5 hrs /da y 6.5 hrs /da y 9.5 hrs 6.5 hrs /da y 6.5 hrs/da y 6.5 hrs /da y 41
    • Program development- year 1 Primary Classroom 3-6 yr. olds Prep Space & Materials 3 monthsLead -PT Staffing 42
    • Program development- year 2Avg. Total # 9 16 Primary Classroom 3-6 yr. olds 9 returni ng 4 yr olds Prep 8 to 10 6 to 8 Space & 2.5 - 3 new 3 yr. Materials yr. olds olds 3 months Year 1 Year 2Lead -PT 1 Lead 1 Lead 1 Assnt 1 Assnt Staffing 3.5 hrs /da y 6.5 hrs /da y 43
    • Program development- year 3 Lower Elementary 6-9 yr olds Prep Space & Materials STAFFING 6 months Lead -FTAvg. Total # 9 16 24 NOTE: length 8 returning Primary Classroom of da y: 5 yr. olds 6.5-9.5 hrs 3-6 yr. olds 9 returning 8 returning 4 yr. olds 4 yr. olds Prep 8 to 10 6 to 8 8 Space & new 2.5 - 3 new 3 yr. new 3 yr. Materials yr. olds olds olds 3 months Year 1 Year 2 Year 3Lead -PT 1 Lead 1 Lead 1 Lead 1 Assnt 1 Assnt 3 Assnts Staffing 3.5 hrs /da y 6.5 hrs /da y 9.5 hrs 44
    • Program development- year 4 Avg. Total # 7 Lower Elementary 6-9 yr olds Prep 6-8 Space & rising 1st Materials yrs. Program Dir. yr. 1 PT ; yrs 2-3 FT STAFFING PT English Teacher PT Music / P.E./ Art 6 months Year 1 Lead -FT 1 LeadAvg. Total # 9 16 24 NOTE: length 8 returning Primary Classroom of da y: 5 yr. olds 6.5-9.5 hrs 3-6 yr. olds 9 returning 8 returning 4 yr. olds 4 yr. olds Prep 8 to 10 6 to 8 8 Space & 2.5 - 3 new 3 yr. new 3 yr. Materials yr. olds olds olds 3 months Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4Lead -PT 1 Lead 1 Lead 1 Lead 1 Assnt 1 Assnt 3 Assnts Staffing 3.5 hrs /da y 6.5 hrs /da y 9.5 hrs 6.5 hrs /da y 45
    • Program development- year 5 Avg. Total # 7 14 Lower Elementary 6-9 yr olds 7 returning 2nd years Prep 7-8 6-8 Space & rising 1st 1st yrs. Materials yrs. Program Dir. yr. 1 PT ; yrs 2-3 FT STAFFING PT English Teacher PT Music / P.E./ Art 6 months Year 1 Year 2 Lead -FT 1 Lead 1 LeadAvg. Total # 9 16 24 1 Assnt 6.5 to 9.5 Primary Classroom hrs 3-6 yr. olds Prep 8 to 10 6 to 8 8Space & 2.5 - 3 3 yr. olds 3 yr. oldsMaterials yr. olds3 months Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5Lead -PT 1 Lead 1 Lead 1 Lead 1 Assnt 1 Assnt 3 Assnts Staffing 3.5 hrs /da y 6.5 hrs /da y 9.5 hrs 6.5 hrs /da y 6.5 hrs /da y 46
    • Program development- year 6 Avg. Total # 7 14 22 7 returning Lower Elementary 3rd years 6-9 yr olds 7 returning 7 returning 2nd years 2nd years Prep 6-8 7-8 8 Space & rising 1st rising 1st rising 1st Materials yrs. yrs. yrs. Program Dir. yr. 1 PT ; yrs 2-3 FT STAFFING PT English Teacher PT Music / P.E./ Art 6 months Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Lead -FT 1 Lead 1 Lead 1 LeadAvg. Total # 9 16 24 1 Assnt 1 Assnt 6.5 to 9.5 Primary Classroom hrs 3-6 yr. olds Prep 8 to 10 6 to 8 3 8 3 Space & 2.5 - 3 yr. yr. olds yr. olds Materials olds 3 months Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6Lead -PT 1 Lead 1 Lead 1 Lead 1 Assnt 1 Assnt 3 Assnts Staffing 3.5 hrs /da y 6.5 hrs /da y 9.5 hrs 6.5 hrs /da y 6.5 hrs /da y 6.5 hrs /da y 47
    • Characteristics of successful immersion programs- Teaching literacy in the target language first- Teaching literacy in one language at a time- Teach literacy in native language second- All lessons take place in one language- Restrict entry after 1st grade- Well developed curriculum with materials- Family commitment- Enrollment retention 48
    • Language Immersion Montessori teachers– lessons learned Speak target language at near native fluency Speak English Experience teaching the language – desired Experience with children General / college educational requirements of the school Montessori certification Good computer skills Teaching to read in target language Knowledge of children’s songs from the culture Excellent intentional language 49
    • Target Language Usage and Best Practices- Different policies on L2 usage according to levels
    • Target Language Usage and Best Practices- Different policies on L2 usage according to levels- Policies on speaking English– students, teachers, parents
    • Target Language Usage and Best Practices- Different policies on L2 usage according to levels- Policies on speaking English– students, teachers, parents- All written material in the classroom - target language- Cursive vs. Print
    • Target Language Usage and Best Practices- Different policies on L2 usage according to levels- Policies on speaking English– students, teachers, parents- All written material in the classroom - target language- Cursive vs. Print- Conference Reports and Communication
    • Target Language Usage and Best Practices- Different policies on L2 usage according to levels- Policies on speaking English– students, teachers, parents- All written material in the classroom - target language- Cursive vs. Print- Conference Reports and Communication- Use traditional Montessori names of works and terms
    • Target Language Usage and Best Practices- Different policies on L2 usage according to levels- Policies on speaking English– students, teachers, parents- All written material in the classroom - target language- Cursive vs. Print- Conference Reports and Communication- Use traditional Montessori names of works and terms- L.I. Strategies for the classroom
    • Target Language Usage and Best Practices- Different policies on L2 usage according to levels- Policies on speaking English– students, teachers, parents- All written material in the classroom - target language- Cursive vs. Print- Conference Reports and Communication- Use traditional Montessori names of works and terms- L.I. Strategies for the classroom- Flexibility
    • Target Language Usage and Best Practices- Different policies on L2 usage according to levels- Policies on speaking English– students, teachers, parents- All written material in the classroom - target language- Cursive vs. Print- Conference Reports and Communication- Use traditional Montessori names of works and terms- L.I. Strategies for the classroom- Flexibility- All lessons of the same content delivered in target language
    • Target Language Usage and Best Practices- Different policies on L2 usage according to levels- Policies on speaking English– students, teachers, parents- All written material in the classroom - target language- Cursive vs. Print- Conference Reports and Communication- Use traditional Montessori names of works and terms- L.I. Strategies for the classroom- Flexibility- All lessons in target language- A Plan for Bi-literacy- A Plan for specials ( P.E. Music Art etc)
    • Parent Education Will my child feel at ease in a LIM classroom? Will my child loose his/her English? Will my child learn to read in English? How well can s/he speak? Read? Write? How much will s/he retain after leaving Primary? What if I do not speak the language?---Use media to demonstrate: video & audio recordingUse scholarly research on language acquisition 59
    • Materials MAKE, MAKE and make some more! Hire a separate PT person for this Be efficient in design and with resources Standardize: fonts, colors, styles 60
    • Most all works made on labels l e pin l e v in in l e l apin l e jar din l a pein tu r e l e cein tu r eein l e r ein l e pl ein l a m ain l e tr ainain l e pain l e pou l ain 61
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    • Measuring outcomes Have a plan to document fluency Have a plan to document writing Use tools that measured outcomes and that are normed by age, state or nationally Do OPIs – and other tools for measuring language acquisition 63
    • GRACIAS DANKE MERCI 64