Gathering Intelligence, Conversations with Users

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Why talk to users? …

Why talk to users?
How to have effective conversations with users
Ways to incorporate user intelligence in your process for better results

Presentation to the Northern NJ Chapter of the IxDA, September 16, 2010.

More in: Design
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  • 1. GATHERING  INTELLIGENCE   CONVERSATIONS  WITH  USERS   Northern  NJ  Interac:on  Design  Associa:on  (IxDA)   September  16,  2010  
  • 2. Welcome  to  the  fall  series   Three  talks  about  prac:cal  user  experience  design   September  16th   Collec&ng  intelligence  –  Lane  Halley   October  14th   “Showcase”  product  case  study  –  Marc  Wendell     November  18th   Sharing  the  vision  –  Duane  Degler   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   2  
  • 3. Who’s  here  tonight?     What  role(s)  do  you  fill?     What  kind  of  products  do  you  work  on?     What  kind  of  company  do  you  work  for?   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   3  
  • 4. About  Lane  Halley     Interac:on  Designer     Agile  /  UX  Coach     20+  years  in  SW  development     Cooper  Fellow  (Goal-­‐Directed   Design©,  Personas)   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   4  
  • 5. What  is  Interac:on  Design?   Interac:on  Design  (IxD)  defines  the  structure  and   behavior  of  interac:ve  products  and  services.     Interac:on  Designers  create  compelling   rela:onships  between  people  and  the  interac:ve   systems  they  use,  from  computers  to  mobile   devices  to  appliances...   hcp://www.ixda.org/   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   5  
  • 6. What  we’ll  talk  about  tonight     Why  talk  to  users?     Effec:ve  conversa:ons     Ac:onable  intelligence   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   6  
  • 7. WHY  TALK  TO  USERS?   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   7  
  • 8. Where  do  features  come  from?   Customers   Product   Developers   Managers   Legacy   Capabili:es   Compe::ve   Market   Product   research   Designers   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   8  
  • 9. How  do  you  recognize  a  successful  product?   Viral  adop:on   Market  success   Solves  a   problem   Awards   Brand  loyalty   Creates  a   Industry  Buzz   new  market   Meets  a  need   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   9  
  • 10. How  does  it  all  fit  together?   A  successful  product  is  more   than  the  sum  of  its  features   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   10  
  • 11. Finding  balance   Product   Viability   Adapted  from  Larry  Keeley,  three  elements  of  a  successful  high-­‐tech  product   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   11  
  • 12. Planning  for  quality   How  do  you  reduce  technology  risk  (capability)?   Some  agile  methods:     Test  driven  development  (TDD)     Small,  frequent  releases     Fail  quickly   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   12  
  • 13. Planning  for  quality   How  do  you  reduce  market  risk  (viability)?     Compe::ve  research     Market  sizing     Pilot  programs   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   13  
  • 14. Planning  for  quality   How  do  you  reduce  experience  risk  (desirability)?     Usability  tes:ng?  Helpful,  but  omen  too  late     Engage  with  real  users  early  and  omen   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   14  
  • 15. Reduce  risk  by  user  valida:on   Product  evolu:on   Bad   Assump:on     09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   15  
  • 16. Reduce  risk  by  user  valida:on   Product  evolu:on   Bad   Bad   Assump:on   Assump:on     Discovered     09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   16  
  • 17. Reduce  risk  by  user  valida:on   Product  evolu:on   Bad   Bad   Assump:on   Assump:on     Discovered     Wasted  :me   and  effort   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   17  
  • 18. Reduce  risk  by  user  valida:on   Product  evolu:on   Bad   Bad   Assump:on   Assump:on     Discovered     09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   18  
  • 19. Reduce  risk  by  user  valida:on   Product  evolu:on   Bad   Bad   Assump:on   Assump:on     Discovered     Less  wasted   :me    and  effort   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   19  
  • 20. What  assump:ons  are  we  making?     Who  is  the  user?  Who  is  the  customer?     Where  does  our  product  fit  in  their  work  or  life?     What  problems  does  our  product  solve?     When  and  how  is  our  product  used?     What  features  are  important?     How  should  our  product  look  and  behave?   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   20  
  • 21. Even  if  you  don’t  plan  for  it   Your  product  delivers  a  user  experience,    whether  you  design  it  or  not.   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   21  
  • 22. Implicit  design   “Even  when  you  don't  see  explicit  design,  there   is  an  awful  lot  of  implicit  design…Google  does  a   good  job  when  they  are  building  products  a   developer  uses  every  day.”   −Ian  McFarland,  Pivotal  Tech  Talk   hcp://pivotallabs.com/talks/106-­‐enough-­‐design   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   22  
  • 23. Great  Google  products   Search   AdWords  +  AdSense   Google  Maps   GMail   Google  Spreadsheets   Google  Gears,  AppEngine,  and  other  Dev  Tools   GoogleVideo   Android   Google  Analy:cs   Chrome   hcp://pivotallabs.com/talks/106-­‐enough-­‐design   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   23  
  • 24. Great  Google  acquisi:ons   Search   AdWords  +  AdSense   Google  Maps   GMail   Google  Spreadsheets   Google  Gears,  AppEngine,  and  other  Dev  Tools   GoogleVideo  YouTube   Android  (hired  teams)   Google  Analy&cs   Chrome   hcp://pivotallabs.com/talks/106-­‐enough-­‐design   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   24  
  • 25. Talk  to  users  early  and  omen   Discovering  what  to  build   How  do  we  discover  what  to  build?  By  working  closely   (and  con:nually,  if  possible)  with  the  customer.  By   getng  feedback  as  omen  as  possible  from  real  users,   and  by  constantly  applying  that  feedback  to  the   product  under  development.     −Steve  Bockman   hcp://agilefocus.com   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   25  
  • 26. What’s  a  user?   “There  are  only  two  industries  that  refer  to  their   customers  as  ‘users’:  computer  design  and  drug   dealing.”    –  Edward  Tume   hcp://www.edwardtume.com/tume/advocate_1099   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   26  
  • 27. What’s  a  user?   User  =  “person  who  uses  the  product”     Consumer  products,  customer  =  user     Enterprise  products,  customer  ≠  user   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   27  
  • 28. Why  don’t  we  talk  to  users?     We’re  users     We  know  a  lot  of  users       We’re  smarter  than  our  users     We’ve  got  a  lot  of  other  important  things  to  do     Users  don’t  want  to  be  bothered     We  don’t  know  how  to  talk  to  users   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   28  
  • 29. Some:mes  you  have  to  speak  truth  to  power   Why  you  shouldn’t  listen  to  the  CEO   …Perhaps  he  has  lost  touch  with  the  reality  of   who  the  users  really  are.  The  way  the  business   is  organized  may  be  clear  to  him,  but  perhaps   not  to  his  users.  Maybe  his  ego  is  getng  in  the   way  of  making  a  ra:onal  decision.   −  Oliver  Gitsham   hcp://www.uxbooth.com/blog/finding-­‐the-­‐balance-­‐users-­‐needs-­‐vs-­‐clients-­‐wants/   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   29  
  • 30. Business  benefits  of  knowing  your  users     Resolve  arguments     Uncover  new  opportuni:es     Scale  up  new  ventures   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   30  
  • 31. Resolve  arguments  about  “what’s  important”   “...it  really  depends  on  how  you  design  and   present  it,  context,  audiences,  and  I  would  say   maybe  a  good  way  might  be  to  pull  some  users,   even  in  your  own  organiza:on  to  do  a  quick  and   dirty  user  tes:ng  with  your  prototype.  Decision   making  on  data  is  becer  than  opinion.”     −  KejunXu,  post  on  IxDA.org  discussion  board   hcp://www.ixda.org/node/27379   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   31  
  • 32. Uncover  new  product  opportuni:es   “...rather  than  understanding  demographics  we  need  to   understand  psychographics.  We  need  to  stop  asking   people’s  opinion…  and  look  at  people’s  behaviour.     ...Understanding  not  the  incremental  changes  that   people  want  now,  but  trying  to  find  new  classes  of   product  through  observa&onal  research.”         −  Andy  Budd,  blog  post   hcp://www.research-­‐live.com/features/the-­‐innova:on-­‐delusion/4003512.ar:cle   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   32  
  • 33. Avoid  mistakes  scaling  up  new  ventures     Realize  that  customers  are  not  the  same  as  users     Recognize  that  first  users  are  not  the  same  as   scaling  users     An:cipate  that  first  products  are  not  the  same  as   scaling  products   −  Charles  Baden-­‐Fuller,  Ian  MacMillan,  Harvard  Business  Review   hcp://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2010/08/3_mistakes_made_in_scaling_up.html   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   33  
  • 34. EFFECTIVE  CONVERSATIONS   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   34  
  • 35. Where  do  you  find  users  to  talk  to?     Licensed/registered  users     In-­‐line  Web  recrui:ng     Conferences  and  industry  events     Special  interest  groups/user  groups     Market  research  firms     Craigslist     Friends  and  Family   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   35  
  • 36. TOOLS  FOR:  Understanding  your  users     Invite  them  to  chat  –  In-­‐line  Web  recrui:ng     Meet  them  –  Site  visits,  interviews     Play  games  with  them  –  Innova:on  Games     Invite  them  to  visit  –  Rapid  prototyping  and  feedback   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   36  
  • 37. In-­‐line  Web  recrui:ng     Ethnio  (www.ethnio.net)   Recruit  people  from  your  website  for  research     “Talk  to  us”  bucon   Start  live  chat  session     Remote  viewing  (Morae  from  TechSmith)   Screen  sharing  and  recording   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   37  
  • 38. Tips  for  effec:ve  interviews     Iden:fy  who  do  you  want  to  talk  to  and  what  you   want  to  learn     Plan  your  interview  themes  as  a  team     Collect  ar:facts,  debrief  and  share     Use  your  visits  for  mul:ple  purposes   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   38  
  • 39. Tips  for  effec:ve  interviews   Use  open-­‐ended  ques:ons  to  encourage  conversa:on   Open:  “What  did  you  have  for  breakfast  today?”   Closed:  “Did  you  eat  breakfast  today?”   Don’t  be  afraid  to  ask  “why”  a  lot.   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   39  
  • 40. Tips  for  effec:ve  interviews   Iden:fy  the  need  behind  a  feature  request   “If  you  HAD  feature  x,  what  would  that  allow   you  to  do?”   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   40  
  • 41. Innova:on  Games   Speedboat   Speedboat   Spider  web   Product  Box   Remember    the  future   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   41  
  • 42. “Five  Users  Every  Friday”   Situa:on     Major  consumer  electronics  retailer  wanted  flexible  fast   implementa:on  of  Web  features     Agile  development,  UX  perceived  as  a  bocleneck   Approach     Rapid  prototyping  and  user  feedback     Full  team  par:cipa:on  required   Results     Greater  confidence,  less  :me  wasted     Improved  team  understanding  of  user  needs   Tom  Ilmensee,  Alyson  Muff   hcp://www.computer.org/portal/web/csdl/doi/10.1109/AGILE.2009.45   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   42  
  • 43. Weekly  research  tasks   Friday  Run  protocol    High  level  summary   Monday  Analyze  data    Create  findings  summary    Create  wireframes   Tuesday  Discuss  recommenda:ons  with  team    Iden:fy  immediate  and  long  term  research  needs  with  team    Create  high-­‐level  test  plans   Wednesday  Prepare  protocol   Thursday  Prepare  ar:facts  /  prototype   Tom  Ilmensee,  Alyson  Muff   hcp://www.computer.org/portal/web/csdl/doi/10.1109/AGILE.2009.45   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   43  
  • 44. TOOLS  FOR:  Synthesis     Ar:facts  from  fieldwork       Affinity  models     Personas     Workflows  and  conceptual  models   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   44  
  • 45. Share  pictures  and  ar:facts  with  the  team   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   45  
  • 46. Use  affinity  models  for  group  synthesis   Photo:  lane  halley   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   46  
  • 47. Good  user  research  =  stronger  personas   Well-­‐researched  personas  help  your  team  make   becer  decisions.  A  good  persona  descrip:on   defines:     Goals     Attudes     Work  or  ac:vity  flow     Environment     Skill  level     Frustra:ons   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   47  
  • 48. Specific  is  more  important  than  accurate   Flickr:  dtsato/582640684   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   48  
  • 49. Workflow  models  inform  good  sketches   Flickr:  jazzmasterson/275800917   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   49  
  • 50. ACTIONABLE  INTELLIGENCE   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   50  
  • 51. TOOLS  FOR:  Envisioning  the  solu:on     Stories/scenarios     Collabora:ve  sketching/Design  Studio     Prototypes   These  techniques  can  be  used  within  your  team  to  build   consensus,  and  with  customers  and  users  to  explore   and  validate  concepts.   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   51  
  • 52. Using  scenarios   Scenarios  help  your  team  explore  and  develop  a  shared   understanding  of  the  desired  user  experience.   1  Set  the  stage   − Who  is  the  subject  of  the  story?   − What  does  this  person  want  to  do  and  why?   2  Tell  the  story:     − Imagine  the  ideal  user  experience   − Describe  informa:on  and  ac:ons,  not  controls   3  Evolve  to  become  more  detailed  and  specific   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   52  
  • 53. Sample  scenario:  about  Peter   PETER  is  a  serious  bike  commuter   •  Owns  several  bikes  (mountain  bike,   recumbent),  doesn’t  own  a  car   •  Biking  is  his  main  form  of  transporta:on     •  Bikes  are  his  hobby,  he  loves  to  look  at   and  learn  about  bikes   •  Carries  lots  of  stuff  when  he  rides   (computer,  books,  groceries)   •  Rides  in  all  weather,  needs  to  get  to   work  clean  and  not  too  sweaty   flickr:  ques:on_everything/2267542126   Scenario:  www.slideshare.net/LaneHalley/design-­‐studio-­‐workshop-­‐scenarios   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   53  
  • 54. Sample  scenario:  Peter’s  scenario   •  Peter  is  a  regular  customer  at  Mike’s  Bikes.  He  learns  that   there’s  a  new  urban  cargo  bike  available  and  he’s  curious   to  check  it  out.   •  When  Peter  gets  to  the  site,  it  recognizes  him  and  shows   him  what’s  new  since  his  last  visit.  He  can  see  there’s  a   street  bike  he  started  to  configure  on  his  last  visit,  but  he   doesn’t  want  to  work  on  that  now.   •  He  easily  finds  the  new  cargo  bike  he  came  to  see.     •  He  learns  about  the  cargo  bike  by  reviewing  some   technical  informa:on  about  gear  ra:os  and  then  watches  a   video  of  the  bike  in  ac:on.     09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   54  
  • 55. Sample  scenario:  Peter’s  scenario   •  He  is  interested  in  the  cargo  bike,  but  wants  to  talk  to   someone  who  owns  one.  He  reaches  out  to  the  Mike’s   Bikes  community  to  ask  a  ques:on  and  quickly  gets  an   answer.   •  He  configures  the  cargo  bike  with  some  op:onal   equipment  he  might  want.  He  can  see  an  adjusted   total  price  as  he  works.   •  Happy  with  what  he  sees,  he  makes  an  appointment   to  come  into  the  shop  on  Saturday  to  see  both  bikes   he  is  considering.   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   55  
  • 56. Collabora:ve  sketching   Photo:  Lane  Halley   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   56  
  • 57. Paper  prototype   Photo:  Lane  Halley   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   57  
  • 58. Tools  and  techniques  for  user  engagement   Tools  and  techniques   Notes   Online  chat   Real-­‐:me  observa:on   Site  visit,  interview   Pacerns  of  use   Behaviors  and  mo:va:ons   Pain  points  and  opportuni:es   Innova:on  games   Mental  models   Shared  team  understanding   Paper  prototype   Validate  and  evolve  concept   Reac:on  to  naviga:on/structural  elements   High-­‐fidelity  prototype   Reac:on  to  visual  look  and  feel   09/16/2010   Test  branding,  messaging   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   58  
  • 59. How  will  you  apply  these  techniques?   The  right  process  for  your  team  depends  on:       Complexity  of  your  product  domain     New  product?  Later  release?     Team  composi:on     Size     Loca:on     Skills   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   59  
  • 60. Recommended  reading   Inspired:  How  To  Create  Products   Customers  Love     Marty  Cagan   Designing  for  the  Digital  Age:   How  to  Create  Human-­‐Centered   Products  and  Services   Kim  Goodwin   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   60  
  • 61. Recommended  reading   Prototyping,  A  Prac&&oner’s   Guide   Todd  Zaki  Warfel   The  Back  of  the  Napkin   Dan  Roam   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   61  
  • 62. Recommended  reading   Innova&on  Games:  Crea&ng   Breakthrough  Products   Through  Collabora&ve  Play   Luke  Hohmann   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   62  
  • 63. Thanks!  I’d  love  to  hear  your  stories…   Lane  Halley   lbh.inc@gmail.com   twicer:  thinknow   hcp://lanehalley.livejournal.com/   www.slideshare.net/lanehalley   09/16/2010   Gathering  Intelligence,  Conversa:ons  with  Users   63