[<br />Look and feel<br />
3,385,000<br />
Rationale          Value            Benefits          <br />
[<br />Look and feel<br />Support Collateral<br />
A5 Flyer<br />
Pull Up Banners<br />
Pot Sleeves<br />
Plant Labels<br />
T-Shirts<br />
GENDER & AGE<br />Improve your Plant/Life Balance has attracted a younger market (as desired) with 72% of the audience bei...
PLANT/LIFE BALANCE APP<br /><ul><li> 5,316 people have registered their plant which demonstrates a huge 26.58%    redempti...
Over 1.3 million views to information we have posted.</li></li></ul><li>Melbourne<br />Sydney<br />
Adelaide<br />Brisbane<br />
Summary<br /><ul><li> 20,000 plants in 6 key capital city locations on March 2, 2011
 5,000 Facebook fans within 24 hours of the event
 14,839 Facebook fans in the month following the event
 78% of engaged audience 18-35 which represents a different audience to that previously engaged by NGIA
 5,695 people have registered their plant which demonstrates a huge 28% redemption rate from the initial 20,000 plants dis...
 5,695 people with registered plants is a massive 38% of total Facebook fans
 Improve Your Plant/Life Balance has achieved 1,369,513 News Feed Impressions</li></li></ul><li>Tactical Campaign 2: Trees...
Tactical Campaign 4: Potted Colour<br />
[<br />Look and feel<br />www.ngia.com.au<br />
Myrtle Rust in Australia<br />Presentation to LAI Conference <br />May 2011<br />Robert Prince: Chief Executive Officer -N...
Myrtle Rust in Australia<br />The most significant threat to Australia’s ecosystems since the arrival of Europeans<br />Th...
Myrtle Rust in Australia<br />Myrtle rust (Uredo rangelii) is a part of the guava rust (Pucciniapsidii) or eucalyptus rust...
Myrtle Rust in Australia<br /><ul><li>Myrtle rust infects plants belonging to the Myrtaceae family, the dominant plant spe...
Myrtaceae includes the iconic genera of Eucalyptus, Melaleuca (paperbark), Callistemon (bottlebrush) Leptospermum (tea tre...
Myrtle rust infects primarily young growth of host plants
This damages leaves, stems, fruits and reduces growth and vigour – may eventually lead to plant death in some species.</li...
High humidity and moderate temperatures (night temperatures of 15−25°C) favour spore germination.
The spores have a short generation time of approximately 10 to 23 days.
The spores can survive for weeks under suitable conditions.</li></ul>Reference: Threat Specific Contingency Plan, Guava (e...
Photo courtesy NSW I&I<br />Myrtle Rust in Australia<br /><ul><li>Detected in Central NSW April 2010
National Interim Response
Undertook surveillance and tracing forward backward
$2 million cost shared by Government (50% states and 50% commonwealth)
480 + infected sites detected in 7 months
Found outside of linked properties –  decision trigger in October/November
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Robert prince landscape industry conference may 2011

701 views
530 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
701
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Robert prince landscape industry conference may 2011

  1. 1. [<br />Look and feel<br />
  2. 2. 3,385,000<br />
  3. 3. Rationale Value Benefits <br />
  4. 4. [<br />Look and feel<br />Support Collateral<br />
  5. 5. A5 Flyer<br />
  6. 6. Pull Up Banners<br />
  7. 7. Pot Sleeves<br />
  8. 8. Plant Labels<br />
  9. 9. T-Shirts<br />
  10. 10.
  11. 11. GENDER & AGE<br />Improve your Plant/Life Balance has attracted a younger market (as desired) with 72% of the audience being in the 18-35 bracket.<br />
  12. 12. PLANT/LIFE BALANCE APP<br /><ul><li> 5,316 people have registered their plant which demonstrates a huge 26.58% redemption rate from the initial 20,000 plants distributed on March 2nd
  13. 13. Over 1.3 million views to information we have posted.</li></li></ul><li>Melbourne<br />Sydney<br />
  14. 14. Adelaide<br />Brisbane<br />
  15. 15.
  16. 16.
  17. 17.
  18. 18. Summary<br /><ul><li> 20,000 plants in 6 key capital city locations on March 2, 2011
  19. 19. 5,000 Facebook fans within 24 hours of the event
  20. 20. 14,839 Facebook fans in the month following the event
  21. 21. 78% of engaged audience 18-35 which represents a different audience to that previously engaged by NGIA
  22. 22. 5,695 people have registered their plant which demonstrates a huge 28% redemption rate from the initial 20,000 plants distributed on March 2
  23. 23. 5,695 people with registered plants is a massive 38% of total Facebook fans
  24. 24. Improve Your Plant/Life Balance has achieved 1,369,513 News Feed Impressions</li></li></ul><li>Tactical Campaign 2: Trees & Shrubs over 1m<br />
  25. 25. Tactical Campaign 4: Potted Colour<br />
  26. 26.
  27. 27. [<br />Look and feel<br />www.ngia.com.au<br />
  28. 28. Myrtle Rust in Australia<br />Presentation to LAI Conference <br />May 2011<br />Robert Prince: Chief Executive Officer -NGIA<br />Images sourced from DEEDI<br />
  29. 29. Myrtle Rust in Australia<br />The most significant threat to Australia’s ecosystems since the arrival of Europeans<br />The disease will likely infect all Myrtaceous plant species in Australia<br />Our native biodiversity is threatened at both a flora and fauna level<br />Images sourced from DEEDI<br />
  30. 30. Myrtle Rust in Australia<br />Myrtle rust (Uredo rangelii) is a part of the guava rust (Pucciniapsidii) or eucalyptus rust complex<br />The eucalyptus/guava rust complex is native to South America and has subsequently been detected in Central America, Mexico, USA (Florida, Hawaii)<br />Images sourced from DEEDI<br />
  31. 31. Myrtle Rust in Australia<br /><ul><li>Myrtle rust infects plants belonging to the Myrtaceae family, the dominant plant species of most Australian forests..
  32. 32. Myrtaceae includes the iconic genera of Eucalyptus, Melaleuca (paperbark), Callistemon (bottlebrush) Leptospermum (tea tree) and Syzygium (lilly pilly).
  33. 33. Myrtle rust infects primarily young growth of host plants
  34. 34. This damages leaves, stems, fruits and reduces growth and vigour – may eventually lead to plant death in some species.</li></li></ul><li>Myrtle Rust in Australia<br /><ul><li>Myrtle rust can complete its entire life cycle on a single host plant.
  35. 35. High humidity and moderate temperatures (night temperatures of 15−25°C) favour spore germination.
  36. 36. The spores have a short generation time of approximately 10 to 23 days.
  37. 37. The spores can survive for weeks under suitable conditions.</li></ul>Reference: Threat Specific Contingency Plan, Guava (eucalyptus) rust Puccinia psidii, Plant Health Australia March 2009<br />
  38. 38. Photo courtesy NSW I&I<br />Myrtle Rust in Australia<br /><ul><li>Detected in Central NSW April 2010
  39. 39. National Interim Response
  40. 40. Undertook surveillance and tracing forward backward
  41. 41. $2 million cost shared by Government (50% states and 50% commonwealth)
  42. 42. 480 + infected sites detected in 7 months
  43. 43. Found outside of linked properties – decision trigger in October/November
  44. 44. Declared Not Technically Feasible to eradicate – December 2010</li></li></ul><li>One predictive model for climate suitability for eucalyptus rust<br />Booth and Jovanovic, pers. comm. as cited in OCPPO 2006<br />
  45. 45. Distribution in of native species known to have been infected in wild or cultivation. Map courtesy K. Cooper, I&I NSW.<br />
  46. 46. An estimated 20% of total greenlife grown within nursery production is of the Myrtaceous family<br />Nationally a $3 billion dollar industry could lose more than $600 000 000 in total production <br />The loss to our urban amenity value could be as high and potentially we could see billions of dollars damage in our natural environment<br />Plantation forestry a high risk area due to species grown.<br />Myrtle Rust in Australia<br />
  47. 47. Recognising Myrtle Rust <br /><ul><li>Myrtle rust requires moisture to enable spore germination (minimum 8 hours darkness required for infection to occur).
  48. 48. Symptoms can occur within 5−7 days of infection. Longer in cooler conditions
  49. 49. Spores are generally produced 10−12 days after infection but can occur earlier depending on host, leaf age and environmental conditions.
  50. 50. Rust spores can survive for up to 3 months. Spores can survive attached to clothing, bark etc.</li></li></ul><li>Photo courtesy NSW I&I <br />How to recognise myrtle rust<br /><ul><li>Rust symptoms can appear as spots/lesions that are brown to grey, often with red-purple haloes, that go the whole way through the leaf.
  51. 51. Approximately 10-12 days after infection, spots produce masses of bright yellow or orange-yellow spores (powdery specks) on the lesion surface. </li></ul>Small purple spots can be early indications of myrtle rust on turpentine (Syncarpia glomulifera)<br />
  52. 52. Photo courtesy NSW I&I<br />How to recognise myrtle rust<br /><ul><li>The spores have a distinctive egg-yolk colour, and often appear on the underside of the leaf first.</li></ul>Newly formed bright yellow pustules of myrtle rust on turpentine (Syncarpia glomulifera)<br />
  53. 53. Photo courtesy NSW I&I<br />How to recognise myrtle rust<br /><ul><li>The spores are bright yellow and can be present on the upper and lower surface of leaves and shoots. </li></ul>Spores of myrtle rust on turpentine (Syncarpia glomulifera)<br />
  54. 54. How to recognise myrtle rust<br /><ul><li>Older lesions can be dull yellow/brown - ash in colour, and although spore masses may have disappeared close examination with a hand lens (x10) can reveal a few spores present on the lesion.</li></ul>Infected areas increase in size and often merge with age<br />Older lesions of myrtle rust on turpentine (Syncarpia glomulifera)<br />Photo courtesy NSW I&I <br />
  55. 55. Photo courtesy NSW I&I <br />How to recognise myrtle rust<br /><ul><li>Severe and repeat infection in young trees may result in death of foliage, shoot tips, and green stems resulting in stunted growth and a bushy growth habit.</li></ul>Severe myrtle rust infection on turpentine (Syncarpia glomulifera)<br />Older lesions<br />
  56. 56. How to recognise myrtle rust<br />Severe myrtle rust infection on stems and foliage of a scrub turpentine (Rhodamnia rubescens) seedling<br />Photo courtesy NSW I&I <br />
  57. 57. How to recognise myrtle rust<br />A very serious pathogen to<br /> Australia’s natural landscape<br />Photo courtesy NSW I&I <br />
  58. 58. Managing Myrtle rust<br />National Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan<br />Staff management<br />Production hygiene<br />Vector of the pathogen<br />Import risk assessment<br />Origin of greenlife<br />Import treatment<br />Surveillance, Monitoring &<br /> Inspection<br />Property<br />Crop<br />Despatch<br />Chemical protection<br />Registered fungicides (PER12156)<br />Curative/protectant<br />Resistance management (rotation) <br />
  59. 59. What do you do if you see myrtle rust?<br />Exotic Plant Pest Hotline<br />1800 084 881<br />National Nursery Industry Myrtle Rust Management Plan<br />www.ngia.com.au<br />
  60. 60. Issues for the Landscape Industry<br /><ul><li> Spreading spores through business activities
  61. 61. Unknowingly supply of infected material
  62. 62. Being caught up in new Trade practices regulations re supply of product that is free of disease.
  63. 63. Access onto production nurseries – browse stock.
  64. 64. Amenity projects – opportunities, monitor and replace</li></li></ul><li>[<br />Look and feel<br />

×