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Landscape Approaches to Agrobiodiversity Conservation and Use
Landscape Approaches to Agrobiodiversity Conservation and Use
Landscape Approaches to Agrobiodiversity Conservation and Use
Landscape Approaches to Agrobiodiversity Conservation and Use
Landscape Approaches to Agrobiodiversity Conservation and Use
Landscape Approaches to Agrobiodiversity Conservation and Use
Landscape Approaches to Agrobiodiversity Conservation and Use
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Landscape Approaches to Agrobiodiversity Conservation and Use

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Global Review Speed Presentation

Global Review Speed Presentation

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  • Abby: please creat title slide with an image of either: 1) agricultural biodiversity – e.g., 50 varieties of maize or apples displayed – not potatoes, as we use that example later; or 2) a clearly diversified farming plot, but not agroforestry – e.g., google permaculture
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  • Transcript

    • 1. Landscape Approaches toAgrobiodiversity Conservation and UseDunja Mijatovic, Yasuyuki Morimoto, Patrick Maundu, NadiaBergamini, Devra Jarvis and Pablo EyzaguirreBioversity International Photo: USDA
    • 2. A Global Review:• Presenting evidence, examples and key concepts. Bioversity International’s research sites• Interdisciplinary approach: bringing together findings from the fields of conservation biology, ecology, ethnobotany and anthropology.• Meta-analysis of Bioversity International’s in situ conservation projects’ outcomes. Farm fields: 24 crops Fruit tress in Central Asia Crop wild relatives Home gardens Date palm in North Africa Tropical fruit trees in Diversity for pest and Bananas in East Africa South-East Asia disease mitigation Landscape mosaics
    • 3. A landscape perspective on agrobiodiversity • Agrobiodiversity as an emergent property of the intended and unintended effects of human actions that lead to modifications or transformations of landscape and ecological relationships (Howard 2010). • Agricultural resilience and sustainability as a function of beneficial links between different agrobiodiversity components (pollinators, soil biota, tree species) at a landscape scale.
    • 4. Culture, land use history and biodiversity Production systems mimicking thestructure of surrounding ecosystems Human-made vegetation ‘islands’ in harsh environmentsAgricultural xbiodiversity x x Degree of landscape modification Photographs F. van Oudenhoven
    • 5. Why a landscape approach to conservation? Agrobiodiversity in a changing landscapeMaintaining the diversity of landscapes, agro-ecosystems, speciesand varieties to sustain adaptation:• Natural and cultural selection (diverse niches, multiple uses)• Seed flow (informal exchange networks)• Domestication (wild fruit tree species)• Gene flow (cross-pollination)• Crop wild relatives (stress-resistance)• Innovation
    • 6. Agrobiodiversity conservation and use in Kitui, Kenya A case studyPhotographs Yasu Morimoto
    • 7. Maintaining agricultural biodiversity in mosaic landscapes for continued evolution and adaptation, sustainability and resilienceLandscape approach to agrobiodiversity conservation and use: • Conserving agrobiodiversty (plants, animals, pollinators, soil biota, crop wild relatives) at various scales (from genetic to landscape level); • Sustaining evolution and adaptation processes that maintain and generate diversity; • Encouraging the use of agrobiodiversity and innovation to enhance resilience and sustainability; • Empowering local communities and strengthening their role as innovators and custodians of genetic resources.

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