Social styles

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  • A ‘critical incident’ is an experience which has significance for you. It is sometimes known as an ‘aha’ moment or an event which made you stop and think, or one that raised questions for you. It may have made you question an aspect of your beliefs, values, attitude or behaviour. Importantly, it is an incident which in some way has had a significant impact on your personal and professional learning (CALT Learning Support, 2010).
  • Role play: Four students each take one behaviour. Students discuss and practice outside the classroom. Role play that you four are at a meeting and an important decision must be made.
  • Social styles

    1. 1. COMM2388 - Internship Landon Carnie
    2. 2. RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 2
    3. 3. What is a „Critical Incident‟? RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 3 An experience which made you stop and think.
    4. 4. The result of a critical incident Raises questions Challenges an aspect of your beliefs, values, attitude or behaviour Impacts you personally or professionally RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 4
    5. 5. What was their critical incident? 1. Describe what happened. What happened that lead up to the critical incident. 2. What was the „tipping point‟ „aha‟ moment‟ or critical incident? What did they learn from the experience? 3. What did they do because of their experience (how did they think or act differently) RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 5
    6. 6. Practice Think… of an experience that made you stop and think. Describe… the context and actual incident. Tell… how it had significance to you and how you felt. Relate… that to previous assumptions or theories learnt. Provide… opportunities for personal and professional growth RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 6
    7. 7. Kolb (1984) RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 7
    8. 8. Leadership & Social Styles
    9. 9. Personal Styles & Effective Performance RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 9
    10. 10. 10 What is behaviour? Behaviour is that which a person says (verbal) and does (nonverbal), in other words, a pattern of actions.
    11. 11. What is interpersonal behaviour? The verbal or nonverbal actions which occur between at least two people. RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 11
    12. 12. What is an interpersonal situation? It is the context, or the circumstances or setting in which at least two people interact. Example: the interpersonal situation (the environment) right now is different than, say next week. Why? The interaction now will be completely different than when we meet again, because we will have a better understanding of each other, we will know each other more, we will have greater knowledge about interpersonal relationships. RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 12
    13. 13. Personality includes everything a person is including ideas, values, hopes, dreams, attitudes and BEHAVIOURS RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 13
    14. 14. What are verbal and nonverbal behaviour clues? Verbal Nonverbal Speed Body movement Inflection Eyes Timing Facial expressions Intonation Hands Monotone Gestures Content Posture RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 14
    15. 15. Dimensions of Behaviour ASSERTIVENESS RESPONSIVENESS RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 15
    16. 16. ASSERTIVENESS…. the extent to which there is an ATTEMPT TO INFLUENCE the thoughts and actions of others. RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 16 Interpersonal relationships ASKS TELLS Tension leads to flight response Tension leads to fight response Hint: Behaviours are very noticeable during TENSION
    17. 17. Self-Perception on the ASSERTIVENESS Dimension RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 17
    18. 18. RESPSONSIVENESS….. is the EXTENT to which a person REACTS to influence, appeals or stimulation or to displays, feelings, emotions and impressions. RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 18 Interpersonal relationships MORE CONTROLLING tension leads to achievement response MORE EMOTING tension leads to acceptance response Hint: Behaviours are very noticeable during TENSION
    19. 19. Self-Perception on the ASSERTIVENESS Dimension RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 19
    20. 20. Points to remember 1. Our behaviours are more predictable than we think. 2. Assertiveness and responsiveness dimensions refer only to BEHAVIOUR, which are actions we can see or hear, and not representative of the total personality. 3. The assertiveness scale describes the effort a person makes to directly influence the thoughts and actions of others. Asks vs. tells. 4. The responsiveness scale describes how much a person shows or controls their emotion. Controlling tend to be more task oriented. Emoting tends to be more people oriented. 5. A key point to always remember is there is no “best place” on either the assertiveness or responsiveness dimensions. RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 20
    21. 21. Review of the Dimensions of Behaviour Section What would more telling behaviour look or sound like? What would more asking behaviour look or sound like? How would you describe controlling behaviours? How would you describe emoting behaviours? Why is there no “best place” on either side? RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 21
    22. 22. Now consider both the assertiveness and responsiveness dimension and place yourself on the SOCIAL STYLE MODEL. RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 22
    23. 23. What does this mean to you and the workplace? Each position can be equally effective depending on the individual‟s ABILITY TO READ AND RESPOND APPROPRIATELY. RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 23
    24. 24. Personal styles at work „just do it‟ Wants to know what and when Likes to take charge RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 24 „do it right or not at all‟ Wants to know how Like to plan „we‟re great!‟ Wants to know why and who Likes co-operation and loyalty „let‟s all do it‟ Wants to know who else Likes energy and optimism
    25. 25. Work style Works in priority order Does several things at once Intense, driven Generates ideas RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 25 Thorough, attentive to detail Step by step procedures Concentrates on one thing at a time, pensive Easy going, cooperative Always willing to be of service Goes with the flow No strong sense of urgency Unstructured, likes freedom Lots of people interaction Makes lists of people to call & places to go
    26. 26. Communicating with your audience RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 26 1. Tailor your message for your audience 2. Focus your content for your audience 3. Speak your audience‟s language
    27. 27. Identifying behaviour to respond appropriately RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 27
    28. 28. Can you identify the social style of these individuals? RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 28
    29. 29. RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 29
    30. 30. RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 30
    31. 31. RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 31
    32. 32. Now YOU! 1. Count the number of “ones” that you marked. Write that number in the Tally Box marked #1. Do the same with the numbers two, three, and four. 2. On the first tally box below, draw a line through the number on the bar graph that corresponds with your total number of “ones." This is the end line for your bar graph. 3. Beginning at the left end, shade the space on the bar up to your end line on the first bar graph. 4. Do the same for the second, third, and fourth graphs. 5. The longest bar is your predominant style. The second longest bar is your backup style. Is there a difference between your personal style inventory and what your peers stated? Why do you suppose this is? RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 32
    33. 33. Assumptions About Personal Styles 1. There is no best or worst style. 2. There are no pure styles. 3. Behaviour style does not explain the whole person. 4. Much of the population is different from you. 5. We all have goals we hope to attain and results we wish to achieve. 6. Apply the “PLATINUM RULE. RMIT University©17/09/2013 RMIT International University Vietnam 33

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