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Community Builders Fixed Term 2012 Funding Round Presentation
 

Community Builders Fixed Term 2012 Funding Round Presentation

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  • In its first 2 years the CB program has been enhanced with the streaming of former CSGP community development services into the program. This process is continuing to operate in parallel with the CB FT rounds which run on an annual basis with the aim that services will be aligned to the CB program guidelines and working towards achieving the identified results of the program. As CB is still considered a new program and the community is still becoming familiar with the new aspects of the program that may not have existed previously with the AAS or CSGP - we feel it is important to continue to provide support and education to the community and NGO’s so that ultimately communities in the region can achieve the intended results of the program via high quality fixed term projects. That’s why we are here today, to help build understanding and clarify our expectations.
  • Community Builders is based on research conducted by C&EY Division. From our research a number of aspects of Community Strength have emerged as key to building stronger communities.
  • C&EY have identified the following Aspects of Community Strength which are the focus of the Community Builders program – Connected – where people have a sense of belonging with others in the community and with the community as a whole Respectful – where people respect each other’s individual rights and understand and respect diversity Participatory – where people have opportunities to be, and are, involved in areas of community life and decision making; Resourceful – where people have access to and use a variety of resources, and where these resources accommodate people’s needs and abilities Trusting – where people trust each other and the institutions in their community These aspects of community strength must be linked to the results of the project – these are the results we want to see in communities from the delivery of CB projects and services. Connection and participation to the broader community are key aspects that all projects must be able to show – we will discuss how to achieve this as it is one of the features that sets CB apart from other community capacity building/community strengthening/community development programs.
  • Each year after the round of CB FT has been completed, CEY review and look at possible areas of refinement based on the feedback from the application process, the assessment process and any feedback provided in the regions. In 2011 there may be some minor changes to clarify which projects can be funded but the intent of the program remains the same – more emphasis will be placed on projects showing how they will include the broader community. Today we want to focus on key concepts that will assist you in developing good CB projects and hopefully help you get a project funded in the next round.
  • CB looks at the ‘type’ of community your project works with – as we know, communities come in all shapes and forms and they can be based on a geographic location or they can be based on how the members identify themselves e.g Aboriginal The community of location is the geographic area/s you target that most participants will come from. The community of location is your BROADER COMMUNITY so it is expected that your project is open to everyone in your community of location Community of Identity – this is how the community you will work with identifies themselves – it may be everyone in the location because your community members identify as people from say Parramatta, it could be that most participants identify as Aboriginal, or a CALD community – or they may identify with a shared interest such as musicians, artists, dirt bike riders, quilt makers etc. Obviously you are not expected to ask everyone what community they identify with but this is based on your knowledge of the community you work with.
  • As you may be aware you must also choose a priority group – this is the group you have identified as being disadvantaged in your community and you have evidence to back that up - such as stats from Council, ABS etc. They can either be: * Socially disadvantaged * Financially disadvantaged * Or both You may also want to define who they are further as either men, women, people of specific age groups CALD or Aboriginal. Whoever your disadvantaged group is, you must demonstrate how you will include them in your project - The concept of the broader community means that the disadvantaged group cannot be the only group serviced by your project, they must also be connected to the broader community by involving other community members from your chosen community of location. This will result in your disadvantaged group being/feeling more included in community life via increased participation, it will break down barriers between community groups, it will increase respect of difference and trust etc. Its important to always keep in mind what aspects of community strength you hope to achieve with this project. Any questions? We do not want single stream projects that focus on a single group in the community eg. Youth, CALD, Aboriginal etc and work only with that group – we want projects to take a whole of community approach – open it up to everyone in the community of location and by doing this they are ensuring the disadvantaged group are included in a broader community project. Inclusion of the broader community is what sets CB apart from other funding programs and it is a key element of our program. It doesn’t mean you can’t do a project with young people, it just means that the project you do should also include and be about the participation of other members of the community – see the project examples for an example of how a youth project might work. It is about shifting thinking from ‘individual capacity building’ to ‘community capacity building’ . Some aspects of projects may still be about individual capacity building such as skills development programs, however you must show how their increased capacity translates to increased community capacity/strength via increased access to community resources or increased participation in community life eg. Volunteering or sitting on a community board/committee as a result of the skills they have developed.
  • The 2011 guidelines will be released at the opening of the round in early November Applicants should have read these guidelines prior to research and consultation exercises so that they know what types of projects will be eligible. Projects that do not meet this criteria will not be considered for funding.
  • Successful projects are well researched, with a well consulted community who have identified their priorities and needs and who endorse the project proposal. a good proposal must show evidence of all those things: Potential applicants should: 1. Know the guidelines well, understand the key concepts and know the eligibility criteria – also make sure you know what the regional priorities are – these can be obtained from your SRSO 2. Approach Council’s CPOs to discuss what the priorities and needs are for the community based on Council documentation. Councils have usually done a fair amount of consultation themselves. 2. Collect some of the evidence, be it ABS data on your LGA, council social plans, local social reports or newspaper articles 3. Then if you know the community type/community of identity that you will target you need to consult with them to find out what they consider their priorities and needs are and discuss project proposals – NB- you will also need t6o target the hard to reach community members during this process - ask them what they would want to do if they had some money to work with. Workshop ideas with the community and share the evidence with them – look at project examples to see if they trigger ideas. CONSULTATION can happen in many forms – you can hold community meetings to bring people together or talk to people informally at community events – you can run a feedback booth in shopping malls or develop a short survey and go to different community meeting places to interview community members. 4. Finally once you have a good project idea, go back to your community or a smaller group to see what they think – this doesn’t have to be a large consultation with 100 people, it should be with people who suggested the ideas and who you think would participate and benefit from the project – use email, phone calls, small focus group – offer a lunch meeting.
  • As you know there are three models in the CB FT program under which your project can be funded – Community Hub is a renewable service model that cannot be funded under CBFT, nor does CBFT fund direct service provision to individual, known clients in a case management or therapeutic setting. (The eligibility criteria are very clear and it is important that before you complete an application you are aware of the eligibility criteria). We have developed a number of project examples using all three SADS, with varying project lengths and amounts to show you what it is that we think make for good CB projects and contribute to building community strength. These examples can be used to generate discussion in the community and now is a great time to get people together to talk about how the Community Builders funding program can benefit your community. Remember that whilst we don’t encourage organisations to apply under more than one SAD for small amounts of money, if you have a skill development component to your project you can choose both CCB and CSD and choose only one activity with one task under the Skills Development SAD. You should always be thinking about how you will collect data for each item you specify under each Activity as the more activity you have the more data you will be required to collect. The key message here is to keep your tasks clear and concise and don’t add unnecessary detail to the tasks column – we don’t need to see long explanations – remember there are people who will be reading and scoring your application based on your content – they have to read sometimes hundreds of applications and the more you make them read, the less you will have their attention! Be clear and concise about your tasks and keep it simple.
  • Under CBFT it is important to keep things simple and not overload your application with multiple SADS, multiple aspects of community strength, multiple priorities – the more you choose, the more you are required to report on and the less realistic it is that you will achieve your intended results. Try to think of it in terms of how much money you are applying for and what is reasonable. Small amounts means one SAD, small number of activities and tasks. Make sure you include the broader community not just your target disadvantaged group in consultation, planning and project delivery! This is key to getting your project funded. When putting your project application together focus on the results you want to see in your community and how you plan to achieve those results – this is where your 5 aspects of community strength will be key – do you want a more connected, more participatory, more respectful, more trusting community – We want all those things for our community but how will your project achieve those – stick to what you know you can achieve and do well. To build your case you must be able to state what evidence you have, what consultation you have done and whether or not you have community support (and how you got that support)!
  • 2010 program guidelines are available and have an example of last rounds application form to help you get started -this document provides a lot of information you need to know about the program however be aware that there may be some changes in the 2011 guidelines so it is important to print up the 2011 Guidelines when they become available. CB is a tender process and guided by procurement legislation so your SRSO, MRS and askcommunitybuilders email support are not able to discuss eligibility of project ideas with you – if you are not sure if your project is eligible or not check the criteria in the Guidelines and discuss it with your CPO.

Community Builders Fixed Term 2012 Funding Round Presentation Community Builders Fixed Term 2012 Funding Round Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Community Builders Funding Program Overview of the 2010 Round and the New 2011 Round to open in October / November
  • Welcome & Acknowledgement I would like to acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land that we are meeting on today, the Awabakal People. I would also like to pay respects to Elders past, present and future and pay respects to any Aboriginal People in the room with us today. Note: I will forward a PDF version of tonight’s presentation to those who request it. Please ensure you sign in and tick the box if you would like a copy of the presentation.
  • Community Builders Introduction
    • Community Builders was launched in 2009 as a funding program for projects that aim to build strength and capacity within communities and enhance their ability to manage issues and respond to change.
    It important to continue to provide support and education to the community and NGO’s so that ultimately communities in the region can achieve the intended results of the program via high quality fixed term projects.
  • Rationale for Community Strengthening Research shows that strong communities are more likely to be able to cope with change and respond to issues using their own resources, leading to:
      • fewer resource intensive interventions;
      • reduction in inequality and disadvantage; &
      • a stronger base to draw on in difficult or crisis situations.
  • Characteristics of Strong Communities
    • Research has shown that strong communities share the following characteristics:
    Connected – where people have a sense of belonging with others in the community and with the community as a whole; Respectful – where people respect each other’s individual rights and understand and respect diversity; Participatory – where people have opportunities to be, and are, involved in areas of community life and decision making; Resourceful – where people have access to and use a variety of resources, and where these resources accommodate people’s needs and abilities; & Trusting – where people trust each other and the institutions in their community.
  • The Community Builders program
    • Based on evaluation conducted by CEY the updated program guidelines for the Community Builders fixed term funding round will be available for the next round
    Applications will be completed online and the round will open in early November 2011 Funding is available for projects ranging from 1-3 years for amounts from $10,000-$100,000 per year i.e. max $300,000 Only minor changes, particularly applicants will be required to show how they will include the broader community
  • 2010 Community Builders Funding Round
    • Today we will be covering the following topics regarding applications:
    • Eligibility Criteria
    • Assessment process for the Tender
    • Common issues with applications
  • Eligibility Criteria for Community Builders for the 2010 – 11 Round 2. Application is received on time. 3. Application is: complete when submitted, addresses all selection criteria in full and is submitted in the correct format. 1. Applicants have a valid ABN and are: an incorporated not-for-profit, non-government organisation, or a local government organisation, or another government agency (only where there is no alternative).
  • Eligibility Criteria for Community Builders for the 2010 – 11 Round 4. The proposed project/service addresses: the relevant priority in the NSW State Plan and one or more Community Builders regional priorities and one or more Community Builders service models and one or more aspects of community strength as defined in the Community Builders guidelines, and A geographic catchment not greater than a single Community Services region, and For fixed term projects only : a clear exit strategy that does not create any ongoing obligation or expectations in the nominated community.
  • Eligibility Criteria for Community Builders for the 2010 – 11 Round
    • 5. The proposed project/service is not:
    > a direct service of another federal, state or local government agency or > eligible for funding under another state or federal grants program or > duplicating projects already in operation in the relevant community or > a direct service to individual known clients, including but not limited to, therapy services, case work/case management/counselling services to individuals or groups or any other function associated with such a service or > seeking funds for a motorised vehicle.
  • Eligibility Criteria for Community Builders for the 2010 – 11 Round 6. In addition, for fixed term projects only , the project must not: have been previously funded for the same purpose in the same community or seek physical infrastructure funds that comprise more than 50% of the total fixed term funds requested or be an extension or continuation of an existing service. And… 7. Where the proposed project/service is delivered by a NSW government agency: that NSW government agency must be the organisation applying for funding and there must be no other eligible organisation capable of delivering the project/service.
  • Assessment of eligible applications Community Builders Selection Criteria 1. The design of the project/service, including the Community Services region and Local Government Area(s) and NSW and regional Community Builders priorities to which it relates, and the aspects of community strength which it will support; 2. The communities of location/identity and priority groups which the project/service targets; 3. The difference (results) which the project/service will make to the nominated communities and priority groups, including, for state government agencies only, the transfer of skills and expertise to the community; 4. The extent to which the nominated Community Builders service models (service activity descriptions) and the selected activities and tasks will assist in achieving the nominated results;…
  • Assessment of eligible applications Community Builders Selection Criteria (Con’t) 5. The sources of evidence which demonstrate the need and relevance of the project/service for the nominated community; 6. The organisation’s capacity i.e. operational and financial processes, which will be used to support the efficient delivery of the project/service; 7. The organisation’s performance and/or quality monitoring processes which will be used to support the effective delivery of the project/service; 8. Value for money as demonstrated by the budget and how it supports the achievement of the nominated results, and For selective tenders, including tenders of one, the selection criteria may be modified where all invited applicants are known to meet certain criteria.
  • Common Issues with Applications Budgets not reflecting service levels; Service levels not clearly stated; Executive summaries not providing sufficient information; and Multiple Service Activity Descriptions being selected and the key tasks not being reflected in the activities. Note: examples of how to overcome common issues are to follow later in presentation re project examples Common problems with applications include:
  • Questions?
    • Any questions to this point of the of the presentation?
  • 2011 – 12 Community Builders Funding Round
    • Presentation will now address the following aspects of applications:
    • Location of Identity
    • Broad community
    • Evidence base
    • Executive summaries
    • Service Levels, and
    • Budgets.
  • Key concepts – Location & Identity Community Builders focuses on the types of communities where projects will be conducted, specifically: Community of Location – LGA/s, region, suburbs Community of Identity – All in location, Aboriginal, CALD, shared interest/affiliation The community of location is your BROADER COMMUNITY so it is expected that your project is open to everyone in your community of location. Community of Identity – this is how the community you will work with identifies themselves.
  • Key Concepts – “broader community” In your application you must also choose a priority group – this is the group you have identified as being disadvantaged in your community and you have evidence to back that up - such as stats from Council, ABS etc. Community Builders aims to connect the more disadvantaged members of a community with their broader community , thereby strengthening the whole community.
  • Key Concepts – “broader community” The priority group can either be socially disadvantaged, financially disadvantaged, or both. Whoever your disadvantaged group is, you must demonstrate how you will include them in your project. You may also want to define who they are further as either men, women, people of specific age groups CALD or Aboriginal.
  • Key Concepts – “broader community” The concept of the broader community means that the disadvantaged group cannot be the only group serviced by your project, they must also be connected to the broader community by involving other community members from your chosen community of location. This will result in your disadvantaged group being/feeling more included in community life via increased participation, it will break down barriers between community groups, it will increase respect of difference and trust etc (its important to always keep in mind what aspects of community strength you hope to achieve with this project).
  • Program Guidelines &Eligibility When the round is announced the guidelines will become available. It is important to read the 2011 Community Builders Program Guidelines. Eligibility criteria:
      • - Valid ABN
      • - Application is received on time
      • - Application is complete, addresses all criteria & submitted in correct format
  • Program Eligibility Con’t
      • - Proposed project is NOT: direct service of or eligible for funding under another state, federal or local grants program, a direct service to known individuals / counselling / case mgt, for motorised vehicle, and
      • - Proposed project addresses: relevant state priorities, regional priorities, service models, aspects of community strength AND project is not greater than a region, has a clear exit strategy
      • - Proposed project must not: have been previously funded in same community, seek more than 50% costs for physical infrastructure, be an extension of continuation of existing service.
  • Developing project proposals 1. Read and know the guidelines well, understand the key concepts and know the eligibility criteria – also make sure you know what the regional priorities are – these can be obtained from your SRSO 2. Research and evidence is essential, like local priorities and needs (e.g. Council’s Social Plan, ABS, Service Statistics, Media). You must demonstrate this in your application. Successful projects are well researched, with a well consulted community who have identified their priorities and needs and who endorse the project proposal. You will need to:
  • Developing project proposals 3. General consultation with the community type / community of identity that you will target you need to consult with them to find out what they consider their priorities and needs are and discuss project proposals. This could also involves contacting the hard to reach community members during this process - ask them what they would want to do if they had some money to work with. Workshop ideas with the community and share the evidence with them.
  • Developing project proposals 4. Specific consultation with smaller groups about your project idea. It should be with people who suggested the ideas and who you think would participate and benefit from the project – use email, phone calls, small focus group – offer a lunch meeting. CONSULTATION can happen in many forms – you can hold community meetings to bring people together or talk to people informally at community events – you can run a feedback booth in shopping malls or develop a short survey and go to different community meeting places to interview community members. And
  • Community Builders Project Examples There are three models of service delivery (Service Activity Description - SAD) that can be applied to CBFT grants: Community Hub is a renewable service model that cannot be funded under CBFT, nor does CBFT fund direct service provision to individual, known clients in a case management or therapeutic setting. Community Capacity Building (CCB) Community Skills Development (CSkD) Community Sector Development (CSeD)
  • Community Builders Project Examples DHS/CS doesn’t encourage organisations to apply under more than one SAD for small amounts of money, if you have a skill development component to your project you can choose both CCB and CSkD and choose only one activity with one task under the Skills Development SAD. You should always be thinking about how you will collect data for each item you specify under each Activity as the more activity you have the more data you will be required to collect. These examples can be used to generate discussion in the community by getting people together to talk about how the Community Builders funding program can benefit the community.
  • Community Builders Project Examples The key message here is to keep your tasks clear and concise and don’t add unnecessary detail to the tasks column, DHS/CS staff don’t need to see long explanations DHS/CS staff will read and score your application based on your content – they have to read sometimes hundreds of applications and the more you make them read, the less you will have their attention! Be clear and concise about your tasks and keep it simple.
  • Summary of key points Keep applications simple and not overload your application with multiple SADS, multiple aspects of community strength, multiple priorities – the more you choose, the more you are required to report on and the less realistic it is that you will achieve your intended results. Be inclusive of broader community involvement , not just your target disadvantaged group in relation to consultation, planning and project delivery! This is key to getting your project funded.
  • Summary of key points Focus on results when putting your project application together. What is it that you want to see in your community and how you plan to achieve those results. DHS/CS want your project to be effective in creating a more connected, more participatory, more respectful, more trusting community. Explain how you will do this through what you know you can achieve and do well. And…. Build your case by being able to state what evidence you have, what consultation you have done and whether or not you have community support (and how you got that support)!
  • Executive Summaries Write a brief description / summary of your project, about your target community, the results you intend to achieve for your target community and how you will do it. Mention the location and identity of the community. For example : - The XYZ project will assist members of the ZZZ community in ABC LGAs to use available community resources and networks more effectively and to build and strengthen their own resilience through the development of a community information website, delivery of classes in internet skills and regular access for members to free internet at the ZZZ community centre (Limit 500 characters).
  • Community Builders Budget Community Builders uses the National Standard Chart of Accounts for Community Organisations (i.e. standard service budget is usually based on such a Chart). Service levels should reflect the amount of funding and project work to be undertaken (e.g. utilise awards to calculate pay rates and wages required). The department understand that a percentage of the organisations management fees will be apportioned to the project and should be included in the budget.
  • Examples of Projects Project Example Newpark Native Garden Enterprise – 1 year project – $30,000 Community Builders service model: This project falls under the community capacity building service activity description as it aims to develop stronger links with the Aboriginal members of the community and increase the connection and participation of the Aboriginal community more broadly in community life.
  • Executive summary: The Newpark Native Garden Enterprise will create a stronger, more connected community in Newpark by connecting Aboriginal members of the community with the broader community of the Newpark LGA to participate in developing a native garden social enterprise and selling produce at the local food market.
  • What difference will this project make to the broader community and priority groups i.e. the Project results? The project will result in more people who live in Newpark particularly Aboriginal people feeling more connected to each other and the broader community and more able to participate in community life through their involvement in the native garden social enterprise. The broader community will be more respectful and trusting of each other through their enhanced understanding of and exposure to Aboriginal culture.
  • Aspects of community strength addressed by the project:
    • a connected community
    • a respectful community
    • a participating community.
    The target community All projects must include participation from members of the ‘broader community’ as well as disadvantaged/priority groups.
  • Community Builders defines: The broader community - as everyone in the community of location; Priority groups – are disadvantaged members within a community who lack access to fundamental material and social resources and/or are socially excluded; Community of location – The community of location is where the participants in the project come from, such as a regions, LGA/s or suburb, town etc. i.e. Newpark LGA; The broader community is everyone in Newpark LGA; &
  • Community of identity – The community members who will participate in this project identify themselves as Newpark residents, therefore the community of identity is ‘All members of the community of location” i.e. everyone in Newpark is able to participate in this project. Community Builders defines (Con’t):
  • Priority groups – the following disadvantaged groups will be included in the project
    • Socially and financially disadvantaged members of a
    • community, and
    • Aboriginal members of the community.
  • The volunteers will promote the project in community centres (youth, seniors and Multicultural centres, Aboriginal centres), via Council websites, working with Council Community Program Officers, providing flyers to groups and Aboriginal community organisations. And How will you include the broader community in this project? The project would also engage with the local Aboriginal community to develop culturally appropriate strategies to engage with local Aboriginal people. All community members who show interest will be invited to the educational workshops or workshops that they are interested in.
  • Community Capacity Building Service Activity Description Duration Tasks Activities 12 months 12 months 12 months Run monthly workshops on garden and horticulture topics, particularly growing native plants & market selling skills (1 program of 10 workshops at 5 different venues including half at Aboriginal community centres or meeting spaces) Develop a social enterprise business model for re-selling produce grown Run a garden opening day (1 event) Community activities 1 month 4 months Recruit 2 volunteers to run the project Attend A/TSI and community network meetings to promote the project and attract participants (6 meetings) Using Community Infrastructure 6 months Develop a ‘how to grow native produce’ newsletter with tips and advice on gardening & distribute twice in the year (10 workshops) Providing information 12 months Construct garden in community space Physical infrastructure
  • Project Example 2 - Oldpark English conversation in the park– 2 year project $80,000 Community Builders service model: This project falls under the community capacity building service activity description (SAD/service model) as it aims to develop stronger links between members of the community and socially isolated people from Culturally & Linguistically Diverse (CALD) backgrounds and increases the connection and participation of those CALD disadvantaged members in broader community life.
  • Executive summary: It also falls under the Community Skills Development SAD as it provides information and training to enhance participant’s inclusion in their community. The Oldpark English Conversation in the Park project will create a stronger, more connected community by bringing together socially isolated CALD community members from the Oldpark LGA with other members of the broader community to participate in social activities that increase English conversation skills. Community Builders service model (Con’t):
  • What difference will this project make to the broader community and priority groups i.e. the Project results? The project will result in increased participation of CALD people in the broader community through social activities that involve English conversation. Community members will feel more connected to each other and the broader community. It will also increase community member’s respect particularly of other cultures and the experiences of people from other cultures
    • a connected community
    • a respectful community &
    • a participatory community.
    Aspects of community strength:
  • The target community All projects must include participation from members of the ‘broader community’ as well as disadvantaged/priority groups. Community Builders defines: The broader community - as everyone in the community of location. Priority groups – are disadvantaged members within a community who lack access to fundamental material and social resources and/or are socially excluded.
  • Target groups The broader community is everyone in Oldpark Suburb. Community of location – The community of location is where the participants in the project come from, such as a regions, LGA/s or suburb, town etc. i.e. Oldpark Suburb. Community of identity – The community members who will participate in this project is everyone from Oldpark therefore the community of identity is ‘All members of the community of location” i.e. everyone in Oldpark is able to participate in this project.
  • Priority groups – the following disadvantaged groups will be included in the project: Target groups Con’t
    • Socially disadvantaged members of a community &
    • CALD – African countries.
  • How will you include the broader community in this project? The project coordinator will promote the project throughout the wider community via posters, flyers and speaking at community meetings inviting English speaking community members of all ages to participate in the project and provide the English conversation expertise to the project. And… African speaking members of the community will be invited through the African association and community centres where African groups meet.
  • Community Capacity Building Service Activity Description Duration Tasks Activities 24 months 24 months Run monthly picnic meetings in the park for African people in the community to come and met with other community members to practice English conversation (20 meetings) Run social outings for group members and other community members to participate in (6 per year = 12) Community activities 2 months Employ part time project coordinator (2 days per week) Using Community Infrastructure 24 months Run information evenings at the local community centre to provide information on CALD support services (6 evenings a year = 12) Providing information
  • Activities & key tasks for Community Skills Development Service Activity Description Duration Tasks Activities 24 months Run monthly English conversation classes on alternate weeks to picnic meetings (20 classes) Other Community Skills
  • For more information & getting started Check the community builders website at www.communitybuilders.nsw.gov.au – Program Guidelines and tender documentation will go up on this website – be sure to look at the 2011 eligibility criteria closely. 2010 program guidelines are available and have an example of last rounds application form to help you get started -this document provides a lot of information you need to know about the program however be aware that there may be some changes in the 2011 guidelines so it is important to print up the 2011 Guidelines when they become available.
  • Community Builders Website Select Funding & Grants 2010 & 2011 Program Info Scroll down for PDF of Guidelines
  • You can also contact your local Community Program Officer (CPO) to discuss needs and priorities for your community. CB is a tender process and guided by procurement legislation so your SRSO, MRS and askcommunitybuilders email support are not able to discuss eligibility of project ideas with you – if you are not sure if your project is eligible or not check the criteria in the Guidelines and discuss it with your CPO. Helpful Hint: Use the online help functions when filling out the application! For more information & getting started (Con’t) Thankyou for your attention & Good Luck.