Lake Texoma Association
2014

1
Lake Texoma Association
 The Lake Texoma Association (LTA is) celebrating over 50 years of
promoting and protecting Lake ...
What economic impacts does
recreation and tourism have?
 Regional Recreation and Tourism have a variety of economic impac...
General Outlook 2014 and Beyond
 Lake Texoma normally attracts more than 6 million visitors and
generates more than $600 ...
5
LAKE TEXOMA REGIONAL ISSUES
 According to the interagency National Drought Resilience Partnership
to Help Communities Pre...
HYDROELECTRIC POWER GENERATION
INCREASES BY SWPA

 Near and long term problems are caused by the federal Southwestern Pow...
WATER SUPPLY
 Future Lake Texoma and Red River water demand and supplies face
serious challenges for residential, commerc...
Lake Texoma Water Annual Loss and
Lake Elevation Changes Summary
 Southwestern Power Administration (SWPA) Hydroelectric ...
FLOOD AND DROUGHT CONTROL IS
REQUIRED FOR MODERN RESERVOIRS
 Public Law 100-71 enacted in 1987 clearly does not provide a...
SUSTAINING THE LAKE TEXOMA
REGIONAL ECONOMY
REQUESTED ACTION
Amend PUBLIC LAW 100-71, JULY 11, 1987 or enact other federal...
REQUESTED ACTION
(3) when the water surface elevation is between 615 and 609 msl, provides for the
Corps to notify SWPA th...
REQUESTED ACTION
(b) defines emergency criteria levels for water supply and power generation as:
(b1) electrical power bla...
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Briefing lta to key leaders on drought and lake elevation safeguards v3 2014

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Briefing lta to key leaders on drought and lake elevation safeguards v3 2014

  1. 1. Lake Texoma Association 2014 1
  2. 2. Lake Texoma Association  The Lake Texoma Association (LTA is) celebrating over 50 years of promoting and protecting Lake Texoma.  LTA is a nonprofit organization functioning much like an area-wide chamber of commerce promoting the entire Lake Texoma region, both Oklahoma and Texas.  Importance of Economy and Jobs  Pew Research Center surveys, businesses and the public have clearly indicated that the economy and jobs trump all other policy priorities.  Strengthening the nation’s economy and improving the job situation stand at the top of the public’s list of domestic priorities for recovering from the recession over the next several years.  Federal, state and local legislators , government officials and others are increasing emphasis on the economy and jobs.  Lake Texoma’s Regional Economic Engine is focused on Recreation and Tourism and has a critical and significant impact on the regional economy, jobs, and the quality of life of Southern Oklahoma and North Texas. 2
  3. 3. What economic impacts does recreation and tourism have?  Regional Recreation and Tourism have a variety of economic impacts. Tourists , boaters, fishermen and other outdoor recreation enthusiasts contribute to sales, profits, jobs, tax revenues, and income in the area.  The recreation and tourism industry, in turn, buys goods and services from other businesses in the area, and pays out most of the income as wages and salaries to its employees. This creates secondary economic effects in the region.  Lake Texoma Regional Economic Impacts  Economic benefits in Tier -1 occur along the lakeshore.  Economic benefits in Tier -2 occur within 30 miles of Lake Texoma and Tier -3 ranging up to 300 miles or more such as Dallas-Fort Worth, Oklahoma City, Kansas and West Texas add greatly to the economic multiplier effect.  For example, numerous Tier -3 fishermen, boaters, campers and tourists regularly visit Lake Texoma on several weekends and quite a few days or weeks of vacation for their primary recreation. They purchase boats, engines, fishing and camping equipment, motor homes and travel trailers and spend travel funds that all contribute to the regional economy and jobs. 3
  4. 4. General Outlook 2014 and Beyond  Lake Texoma normally attracts more than 6 million visitors and generates more than $600 million per year in Tier 1, 2 and 3 economic benefits.  Lake Texoma started the 2013 summer season with some temporary relief from the ongoing drought since 2011 with a normal 617 msl lake elevation. The summer and fall have been hot and dry seasons.  Lake levels have decreased rapidly due to drought, high temperatures, evaporation and greatly increased hydro-power generation.  The Lake Texoma elevation has decreased below 610 msl 1/1/2014 and is approaching 605 msl greatly increasing safety hazards, infrastructure and boat damage, closing most boat launching ramps and causing major regional visitor decreases.  Most lake area businesses have reported 20 to 40% reductions in revenue during previous droughts. Drought intensity outlooks are increasing.  $120-140 million loss / per year  Over 2,700 Oklahoma and Texas jobs at Lake Texoma are being affected to varying degrees as well as the overall regional economy. Types of regional destinations, businesses and tourism/recreation follow. 4
  5. 5. 5
  6. 6. LAKE TEXOMA REGIONAL ISSUES  According to the interagency National Drought Resilience Partnership to Help Communities Prepare for Drought and reduce the impact of drought events on livelihoods and the economy "The impacts of drought can be devastating to local communities and economies and don't end with the onset of fall and winter."  Lake Texoma surface elevations have rapidly decreased from the normal conservation pool elevation of 617 msl in June 2013 to the first serious alert point of 612 msl on 10/30/2013 identified in PUBLIC LAW 100-71, 7/11/1987. Lake elevations were at 609 msl and rapidly declining on 1/13/14.  The water demand for the cumulative hydroelectric power generation, water supply, evaporation and National Weather Service and other drought outlooks for several months in 2014 indicate critically low lake elevations and severe regional economic impacts will be reached in the near future.  Moreover, severe regional droughts have repeated every 15 to 20 years since 1895 according to USDA’s Annual OK Precipitation History. 6
  7. 7. HYDROELECTRIC POWER GENERATION INCREASES BY SWPA  Near and long term problems are caused by the federal Southwestern Power Administration (SWPA) that points to Texas market demand and pricing spikes causing their major increase in generating Lake Texoma power for Texas customers and rapidly depleting the critical water reserves of Lake Texoma up to three feet of surface elevation per month.  This is only one example of increasing and future Upper Red River and Lake Texoma cumulative hydropower/water supply demands and normal cyclic severe drought conditions within the watershed exceeding available supplies.  Public Law 100-71 enacted in 1987 clearly does not provide adequate protection 26 years later for several hundred million dollars of existing, planned and future tourism and recreation revenue and economic development in the Lake Texoma area and requires updating to meet present and forthcoming requirements.  Flood, Drought Control and Conservation are essential for modern river watersheds and reservoirs. The lake area is one of the increasingly important federal project purposes comparing favorably economically with hydroelectric power generation, water supply and watershed management. 7
  8. 8. WATER SUPPLY  Future Lake Texoma and Red River water demand and supplies face serious challenges for residential, commercial and agricultural interests.  A review of Texas Water Regions A, B, C and D future demands, alternatives and plans along the Red River Watershed indicate that there simply isn't enough water in the Red River and Lake Texoma to meet cumulative DFW area and Upper Red River demands.  The situation is worsened by the increasing sedimentation and decreased water supply volume in Lake Texoma for water supply, greatly increased hydroelectric power generation as well as the return of normal, recurring, extended drought conditions in the region.  As a result of major stakeholder concerns. the Lake Texoma Association has passed a Resolution to provide Lake Texoma Region Drought, Tourism, Recreation and Lake Elevation Safeguards. 8
  9. 9. Lake Texoma Water Annual Loss and Lake Elevation Changes Summary  Southwestern Power Administration (SWPA) Hydroelectric power generation: 3 feet/month (or 36 feet) per year in a 86,000 acre reservoir. This is a major new increase over normal generation.  North Texas Municipal Water District water supply removal: 3 feet per year using the new pipeline operational in the Spring of 2014.  Evaporation during hot drought conditions: 5.79 feet per year based upon 2011 experience for a grand total of ~ 45 feet per year for all current causes.  The National Weather Service Drought Seasonal Outlooks for Lake Texoma and the Upper Red River Watershed indicate drought persisting or intensifying in the watershed.  NWS Long Term Climate Influencing Factors graphics indicate that current variations in global Sea Surface Temperatures support long term Texas and regional drought conditions.  Lake Texoma elevations can decrease rapidly from the average conservation pool of 617 msl to below 607 msl causing major negative economic impacts. Impacts increase exponentially in a severe drought. 9
  10. 10. FLOOD AND DROUGHT CONTROL IS REQUIRED FOR MODERN RESERVOIRS  Public Law 100-71 enacted in 1987 clearly does not provide adequate protection 26 years later for several hundred million dollars of existing, planned and future tourism and recreation revenue and economic development in the Lake Texoma area and requires updating to meet new requirements.  The Lake Texoma region is one of the increasingly important federal project purposes comparing favorably economically with hydroelectric power generation, water supply and overall watershed management.  Flood, Natural/Manmade Drought Control and Effective Conservation are essential for modern river watersheds and reservoirs.  Many water reservoirs utilize drought management plans and conservation/water restrictions to conserve the available water supply in times of drought and emergency.  Obviously Lake Texoma requires an effective Drought Management and Response Plan that includes specific percentages of conservation capacity, lake surface elevations as well as water restriction stages. 10
  11. 11. SUSTAINING THE LAKE TEXOMA REGIONAL ECONOMY REQUESTED ACTION Amend PUBLIC LAW 100-71, JULY 11, 1987 or enact other federal legislation to add Drought Control as a key Lake Texoma Project purpose AND Amend PUBLIC LAW 100-71, JULY 11, 1987 lake surface elevation action items and trigger points and related management plans for the conservation pool in Lake Texoma that: (1) attempts to maintain a water surface elevation between the seasonal pool elevation of 619 and 615 msl: Provided however, That hydroelectric power will be generated and water supplied to help satisfy electric loads and water demanded when the water surface elevation is between the seasonal target of 619 and 615 msl; (2) when the water surface elevation drops below 615 msl or lower, implements a public information, conservation and drought management program including North Texas Municipal Water District (NTMWD) Stage 2 or equivalent water restrictions; 11
  12. 12. REQUESTED ACTION (3) when the water surface elevation is between 615 and 609 msl, provides for the Corps to notify SWPA that hydroelectric power generation should only be made when it is needed for rapid response, and short term customer peaking demands (brown outs)as recommended by the power scheduling entity and determined by the Corps; and provides for the Corps of Engineers to notify municipal, agricultural/irrigation and industrial water users to implement NTMWD Stage 3 or equivalent water conservation restrictions designed to lessen the impact of municipal, irrigation, and industrial water withdrawals. (4) when the water surface elevation is between 609 and 600 msl(a) provides for the Corps to notify the SWPA that hydroelectric power generation shall only be made to satisfy customer emergency power needs on the power scheduling entity's electrical system as recommended by the power scheduling entity and determined by the Corps; and, 12
  13. 13. REQUESTED ACTION (b) defines emergency criteria levels for water supply and power generation as: (b1) electrical power blackouts and, (b2) all water supply districts and their customers have implemented their most stringent water use requirements such as NTMWD Stage 4 or equivalent water conservation restrictions ; (c) provides for the Corps of Engineers to notify municipal, agricultural/irrigation and industrial water users that they shall implement their most stringent water conservation measures designed to lessen the impact of municipal and industrial water withdrawals. (5) when the water surface elevation is between 600 and 590 msl(a) All water removal stops from Lake Texoma for any reason except for minimal environmental flows of 50 cfs or less. 13
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