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Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
Minnesota Business Mag 5/12
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Minnesota Business Mag 5/12

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Rock Your Block's, Steven Ladin Cover

Rock Your Block's, Steven Ladin Cover

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  • 1. » The ROI of a MINNESOTA BUSINESS Single Donation p. 18 MAY 2012 INFORMATION & INSIGHT FOR GROWING COMPANIES MAY 2012 Giving Back A look into the contributions & partnerships of Minnesota Organizations Rock Your Block Steven Ladin, CoFounder Sharing and Tasks Page 22 Caring Hands Unlimited Mary Jo Copeland Karen Johnston, Page 34 Executive Director Page 44 APRIL 2011minnesotabusiness.com minnesotabusiness.com
  • 2. Now leasing and open for occupancy.
  • 3. “My passion is to alleviate the suffering of thosewho have had a hardtime. I have a great deal of passion, empathy and concern for those in need.”—MARY JO COPELAND, DIRECTOR OF SHARING AND CARING HANDS
  • 4. YOUR EMPLOYEES WOULDLOVE A HEALTHIER CHOICE. SMMY PLAN BY MEDICA.Now you can give your employees the kind of coverage they really want, and manage healthcarecosts, too. Because now My Plan by Medica SM is available from Doherty Employer Services.My Plan is a defined contribution health plan. You choose your contribution, your employeeschoose their own coverage from a wide range of plans. My Plan by Medica is a sweeter dealfor everyone. And Doherty is the only HR outsourcing firm that has it.If you’re a small business, call Doherty at 952-835-8888, or visit dohertyhro.com.Your employees will love you for it.
  • 5. Contents Minnesota Business Magazine Volume 22 Number 02 May 2012DEPARTMENTS FEATUREINTELLECTUALPROPERTY16 300 patents, one man. 34 SECTION GIVING BACKBY MAURA KELLER A look into the contributions & partnerships of MinnesotaIN THE BLACK Organizations18 The ROI Of A Single DonationBY KRIS VRUNO HUSON 34 Editors Statement20 Heartland Investigative GroupBY JOHN P. PALEN 36 Hands-On Difference22 Steven Ladin Rocks The Block BY DAN EMERSONBY STEVEN LADIN 39 Give MN Infographic24 Finnegans Raises the BarBY DANA SEVERSON 40 Inspiring Others BY MAURA KELLERTECH26 Technology & Happy Hour 43 Haiti OutreachBY KEEGAN SHOUTZ BY NICOLE HARRISONCAPTIAL MARKET 44 Tasks Unlimited28 New Laws Signed BY RACHEL HICKOKBY NATHAN NELSONMARKETING30 Campaign for ClarityBY KIM OPITZ30 Authentic GivingBY STEVE WEHRENBERG 2032 Crisis CommunicationsBY PAUL MACCABEEIN EVERYISSUEINSIDE 4EDITOR’S NOTE 6OPENERS 9PEOPLE 14SEEN 46SMBMSP #44OLSON Marketing EventCLOSERS 48 22
  • 6. Inside KEY PEOPLE & COMPANIES IN THIS EDITIONCOMPANIES PEOPLE3M p.42 RBC Wealth Management p.36 Angelica King p.42 Patrick Doyle p.32Allianz Life Insurance p.37 Read Indeed p.40 Ann Bancroft p.13 Paul Jaeb p.20Augsburg College p.24 Rock your Block p.22 Caryn Evans p.22 Rachel Hickok p.44Bridge Works p.38 Second Harvest Heartland p.37 Diane Lilly p.12 Ray Mithun p.30Campbell Mithun p.30 Securian Financial Group p.10 Dr. Mark Kroll p.16 Sarah Young p.22Cargill p.42 Sharing & Caring Hands p.35 Dr. Rebecca Thomley p.43 Shannon Toren p.37Childrens Cancer Research Fund St. Jude Medical p.16 Jacquie Berglund p.24 Steven Ladin p.22p.18 Starkey Hearing Technologies p.43 Jenni Morine p. 36 Sue Moyer p.36Dominos p. 32 Target p.42 Joan Mondale p.12 Walter White p.38Ecolab p.36 Tasks Unlimited p.44 John Campbell p.36 Wayne Dyer p.34Finnegans p.24 The McKnight Foundation p. 12 John Hibscher p.22Frank p.10 The National Association of Karen Johnston p.44General Mills p.42 Broadcasters p.48 Katie Hageboeck p.18Give MN p.39 United Way p.30 Lindsay Whalen p.12Heartland Investigative Group p.20 University of Minnesota p.18 Maria Keller p.40Hollstadt & Associates p.37 Weber Shandwick p.48 Mary Jo Copeland p.35Kierans Irish Pub p. 24 Wells Fargo Foundation of Minnesota p. 44 Melisa Franzen p.12Land O Lakes p.36 Wells Fargo p.36 Mike Patterson p.36Lola Red Public Relations p.26 Women Venture p.48 Pamela Alexander p.12Marco p.12 Work Smarter, Not HarderOtto Bremer Foundation p.36 Feel like business shouldn’t be this difficult? Are you working harder than you need to? We can help you be more productive by organizing your business documents, information, and processes. With a document management system from Marco, we can save your staff time, improve your worklow, and eliminate redundancy. That means you’ll work smarter, not harder, to improve your bottom line. Not sure where to begin? Start by talking to us about your current business processes and systems. We’re all ears. marconet.com Learn about an easy and affordable solution for managing your organization’s documents. Visit www.marconet.com/WorkSmarter.4 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 7. June 4th, The Depot Minneapolis FOR MORE 2012 Renaissance FEATURING INFORMATION AND TO REGISTER GO TO 5:30–8:30 PM Hotel DON SHELBY minnesotabusiness.comJoin us for Minnesota Business Magazine’s inaugural Best Companies to Work For 2012,honoring Minnesota companies that are setting the standard for leadership, strong beneits, best workenvironment, innovative training programs, happiest employees and more. The awards recognize local companies that make an impact on Minnesota business through their employees. PRESENTED BY: SPONSORED BY:
  • 8. editor’sNOTE “An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity.” >> MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. JUST A FEW DAYS AGO, I spent the afternoon at Sharing and Minnesota Business Magazine, isnt just about business; this Caring Hands in Minneapolis, watching Mary Jo Copeland combat is an intrinsic truth I knew weeks ago when I entered the role pain with love and dispair with hope. Mary Jo sat not behind her of Editor-in-Chief. As our publication moves into a new chapter, desk, but instead walked around all the buildings, touching each youll notice a continued commitment to excellence, a stable vi- person she came into contact with. The ultimate leader, I found my- sion, proven strategy and a willingness to evolve into the future of self forever changed by her optimism and dedication to serve those shedding light on the stories our community have to ofer. In this that others had marginalized. It reminded me of my days teaching issue, we chose to feature non-proits that were often sidelined at the State of Minnesota Workforce Centers, seeing my coworkers or forgotten and the businesses that helped make their mission cultivate plans and awareness for the clients they served. possible. I hope that youll see the care we took in selecting each You see, theres something about human touch and the tan- partnership, showcasing powerful messages and proving bottom- gible that begs to be noticed in a world of the busy and electronic. line results that make giving back so important. Our success as With multi-tasking and overlapped layers that contain the mo- human beings and executives comes down to one, simple truth: ments of our day, I often wonder what has happened to the emo- Everyone has something to give. tions in-between. We are simply not machines. Our businesses and passions are more than we give them credit for. In forming strategic partnerships with the organizations we care about, we become larger than a bottom-line igure or a "brand" perception. We become, real. Kate Madonna Hindes Editor In Chief Minnesota Business Magazine kate.hindes@tigeroak.com minnesotabusiness.com @MnBizMag facebook.com/MnBizMag6 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 9. now offering you another way to be green with our PUBLISHER CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Stefani Pennaz Marcel Gyswyt digital edition EDITORIAL E D I T O R I N C H I E F Kate-Madonna Hindes S T A F F W R I T E R Maura Keller C O P Y E D I T O R Jo Nelson CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kim Opitz Dana Severson Minnesota Business Magazine is digital. Go to minnesotabusiness.com for details. ADVERTISING ADVERTISING SALES Jeannine Pfeifer, jeannine.pfeifer@tigeroak.com ART ART DIRECTOR Dana Oelfke LEAD STAFF P H O T O G R A P H E R Tate Carlson STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Emily J. Davis PHOTOGRAPHY INTERN Lauren Carpenter, Derek Lundmark PRODUCTION PROJECT DIRECTOR Dianne Talmage P R O J E C T C O O R D I N A T O R Rachel Gernander G R A P H I C D E S I G N E R Emily Bretzel CIRCULATION CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Jeremy Wieland N E W S S T A N D M A N A G E R Kelley Wood CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE Valerie Asante FULFILLMENT MANAGER Kasey Taube REPRINT SPECIALIST Anne DeWolfe ADMINISTRATION CREDIT MANAGER April McCauley ACCOUNTANT Pat Schossow MARKETING & PROMOTIONS EVENTS & PROMOTIONS MANAGER Amanda Peterson E V E N T S C O O R D I N A T O R Dahlia Brue WEB WEB DEVELOPMENT MANAGER Sandy Powell Tiger Oak Media One Tiger Oak Plaza 900 South Third Street Minneapolis, MN 55415 If growth is in the game plan for your business, count us in. Whether you’re 612.548.3180 starting from scratch or looking to expand, Bremer Bank is ready with a full Reprints: For high-quality reprints of 500 or more call Anne DeWolfe at 612.548.3868 range of inancial solutions, backed by more than 100 years of experience We occasionally make our subscriber names available to companies and nearly $8 billion in assets. We can help you get where you want to go. whose products or services should be of interest to you. If you prefer not to be included, you may request that your name be removed from our special Talk to a Bremer business banker near you today. promotions lists. Write to Minnesota Business Magazine, Circulation Department, 900 South Third Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 55415. © Copyright 2011 Tiger Oak Media. All rights reserved. The opinions of columnists are their own. minnesotabusiness.com Minnesota Business Magazine (ISSN 15396452) is published monthly by COUNT US IN.Tiger Oak Publications, 900 S. Third St., Minneapolis, MN 55415. Phone: 612-548-3180. Fax: 612-548-3181. Subscription rates $24 for 12 issues,$36 for 24 issues, $45 for 36 issues. Back issues: $5.00. USPS Publication #20375. Periodicals postage paid at Minneapolis, MN and additionalmailing offices. Printed in USA. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 1-800-908-BANK (2265) Minnesota Business, 900 S. Third St., Minneapolis, MN 55415. Bremer.com Member FDIC. © 2012 Bremer Financial Corporation. All rights reserved. May 2012 minnesotabusiness.com 7
  • 10. Openers May 2012 Trends, News, Events and Ideas Impacting Minnesota Companies * BY THE NUMBERS * 54% According to American Express Open, women-owned businesses have increased over 54% in Minnesota since 1997. State wide attributing to roughly 141,900 Estimated number of $20 BILLION women-owned firms in Minnesota WOMEN-OWNED BUSINESSES95,700in Minneapolis/St. Paul $15 BILLION in Minneapolis/St. Paul 146,100 Total number the firms 111,300 in Minneapolis/St. Paul employ in Minnesota May 2012 minnesotabusiness.com 9
  • 11. Openers + MINNESOTA BUSINESS ANNOUNCES BEST 100 COMPANIES The 100 Best Companies to Work For competition salutes Minnesota organizations that are setting the standard for leadership, benefits, Upgraded best work environment, innovative training programs and employee happiness. In it’s inaugural year, the awards recognize small, mid-sized and large businesses that continue to Credit: make an impact and set the standard of excellence for others to follow. Beginning on February 15, 2012, independent research group, Gilmore A Sign Of Prosperity? Research, gathered information from employee satisfaction surveys over phone and mail. Over 5769 individuals responded on behalf of hundreds of companies. Join us in celebrating the Best 100 duringseCuRIaN fINaNCIaL gRouP, (SFG) announces that two of its subsidiaries serving the inancial our inagrural event being held at the Depot Rennaisance Hotel ininstitution market were upgraded by A. M. Best. Securian Casualty Company (SCC), SFG’s primary prop- Minneapolis on June 4, 2012 fromerty and casualty underwriting company, was upgraded to A (Excellent, third highest of 16 ratings). In its 5:30-8:30 p.m. To register, visitupgrade announcement, A.M. Best cited SCC’s role “as a more integral part of Securian as it has enabled the http://bit.ly/RegisterBest100 and reserve a table or sponsorship.parent to deliver a broad range of credit insurance product oferings and services to the inancial institution Winners will be showcased duringmarket nationwide.” In addition, Securian’s recently acquired life and health company, Southern Pioneer Life the evening presentation with guestInsurance, was upgraded by Best’s to A- and Best’s airmed the A- ratings of American Modern Life, Balboa M.C., Don Shelby.Life Insurance Company, Balboa Life Insurance Company of New York, Cherokee National Life and CNL/ For more information, please callInsurance America. Best’s A- rating is Excellent, fourth highest of 16 ratings.  Stefani Pennanz at: 612-548-3210. Frank named, company ever to make the WorldBlu List of Most Democratic Workplaces™. WorldBlu, a company “Most Democratic specializing in organizational democracy, today announced it has certiied 48 organizations as Workplace.” part of the sixth annual WorldBlu List of Most Democratic Workplaces 2012, published annually on “Democracy in the Workplace Day.” Frank joins other well-known organizations certiied on the MINNeaPoLIs CHaNge communications WorldBlu list including Zappos.com, DaVita, Great agency, frank (areyoufrank.com) is proud to Harvest Bread Company, New Belgium Brewery announce it has been named the irst Minnesota and WD-40.10 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 12. Saver’S Switch . it juSt ® might be the eaSieSt money your buSineSS makeS all year. Saver’s Switch cycles your air conditioning condensers on and off as needed on the hottest days. You’ll hardly notice a difference in Sign up now at temperature, but you get a monthly discount of $5 per AC ton June through ResponsibleByNature.com/Business. September…it can add up to an average of hundreds of dollars. ® © 2012 XCEL ENERGY INC. For everything you do,711141_04530 7.25x4.5 4c we salute you We applaud the eforts of small business owners everywhere. We are ready to help with Save $400 Appreciation Ofers on banking services you need to over run your business. on Appreciation Ofers Ask us about our for small businesses Appreciation Ofers by calling 1‑877‑436‑4170 or contact your local banker today. wellsfargo.com/appreciation Potential savings of “$400 or more” is based on estimated savings on combined fee waivers and rate reduction for special ofers. Please consult a banker for details on savings and duration for individual product and services ofers. Please also refer to the Business Account fee and Information Schedule for details on monthly service fee waivers and other discounts. Ofers may be modiied or withdrawn at any time without notice and may not be transferable. Savings noted above based on standard fees applicable to selected business solutions. Terms and conditions of accounts, products, programs, and services are subject to change. All applications are subject to approval. © 2012 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. NMLSR ID 399801 (711141_04530)
  • 13. Openers GiRl ScoutS State ofUnemployment honoR 100 of Minnesota’s most influential women 171 out of 337 according to the agC of america, construction employment increased in 171 out of 337 metropolitan areas between february 2011 and february 2012. ASSOCIATION OFFICIALS said employment was increasing in manymetro areas thanks in large part to growingprivate sector demand for construction. “It is encouraging that the number ofmetro areas experiencing constructionjob gains outpaced the number of areaswith losses,” said Ken Simonson, the asso- AS PART Of ThE yEARLONG 2012 celebra- the award categories include:ciation’s chief economist. “The increases tion of the girl Scouts Centennial, girl Scouts Trailblazer, Guide, forever Green, Communitywould be even more widespread if not of Minnesota and Wisconsin river Valleys will Champion, Women of Promise and honorablefor public sector budget woes and a shaky honor 100 girl Scout alumnae and community MENtions.homebuilding market.” members who exemplify the culture, values, Association oicials noted that private diversity and spirit of the girl Scout Move- Centennial gala honorees include Joansector construction spending shot up by ment during a special gala event. nominated Mondale, ann Bancroft, diane lilly, pamela10 percent in the past year even as public by friends, family, coworkers and community alexander, Melisa franzen and lindsay Whalen.sector investments in construction activity members, each of the Centennial awardhave dropped by 1 percent. honorees live their lives in accordance to core for a description of each category and a girl Scout values. complete list of honorees, visit GSRV100.org. p h oto Co U r t e Sy o f t h e g i r l S Co U t S * By the nUMBerS * $10 Million $2.1 Million Marco announced today that it distributed annual shareholders’ meeting where the McKnight foundation has $2.1 million in stock beneits for iscal they learned about Marco’s 17.2% stock approved over $10 million grants in the 2011 to eligible employees. their 421 appreciation and received a certiicate irst quarter of 2012. employees celebrated last week at their identifying their ownership stake.12 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 14. Green Cleaning ...with a ConscienceTasks Unlimited Building Services has been providingaward-winning, economical janitorial, grounds maintenanceand mailroom services to local businesses—employing peoplewith disabilities since 1970. Your company can help make a difference in our community. Call us for more information. Contact Gil Bessard at 612-767-2059 or visit www.tasksunlimited.org.
  • 15. People BUSINESS PEOPLE IN THE NEWS CAREER MOVES » BRIAN DUNN OPUS GROUP hIGhLAND BANK The Opus Group named Highland Bank, Richard figueroa to the announced that Jay newly created position of hammond has been Director of Capital Markets. named President of the In this role, Richard will focus organization and member of on identifying diverse sources and types its Board of Directors. Hammond will be of capital available to Opus to fund new responsible for implementing strategic development projects. As the commer- initiatives outlined by the senior In April, Brian Dunn, cial real estate market continues to show management team and the Board of signs of recovery, Opus has an active Directors; growing the organization and Best Buys CEO abruptly portfolio of projects under construction building value by motivating, managing resigned and Mike Mikan was that includes five corporate campuses, and leading staff through example and named interim CEO. student housing and other multifamily participation. He joins the bank with projects across the country. nearly 30 years of community banking experience. "I have enjoyed every one of my 28 years with this company, and I PCG AGENCIES LILJA leave it today in Jeff Sibell has joined PCG Agencies as the Lilja recently hired Linda Tedford as vice position for a Vice President of president. Linda comes to strong future. I am Finance. Jeff has many years of experience in the us from major and planned gift fundraising at Fairview proud of my fellow insurance, financial services, and Foundation. At Lilja, she will oversee legal areas and brings extensive IT business development and the growth employees and I skills as well. We are excited to of Lilja LifeStories, which helps individu- wish them the welcome Jeff to the agency. als and businesses record and share their stories. best." —BRIAN DUNN MOSS & BARNETT fLM Moss & Barnett, A Farmer, Lumpe + Professional Association, McClelland (FLM) is pleased to congratulate fOCUS fINANCIAL promoted Michele Johnson Thomas A. Keller III who was to Vice President and a member named a Director Emeritus by Focus Financial congratulates one of its own: Financial Advisor, Darin P. of the fast growing company’s leadership Children’s HeartLink for his 26 years of Glanzer, has acquired the designa- team. Johnson joined FLM in the fall of service on Children’s HeartLink’s board, tion for Certified Financial Planner™ 2011 as Director of Business Analytics including serving as a past board chair. after months of studying and testing. working out of the FLM Minneapolis Keller is still a very active supporter of Darin offices out of the Roseville, MN office. “We are honored to have Michele the organization. Keller is a member of headquarters and Brandon, SD office. on our team. Her business savvy, unique Moss & Barnett’s business law practice skills in web and application development area. During his more than 40 years of Focus Financial has hired Lisa Villalta and client management skills are making practice, Keller has successfully assisted as Compliance Specialist. Focus a major impact on FLM success,” says his clients with mergers and acquisi- Financial is an independent, non- Rob McClelland, FLM president. “We look tions, corporate governance, executive proprietary financial services firm forward to her ongoing contribution to compensation, contracts, securities, with 36 offices across 6 states and our leadership team and assisting us in financing, license agreements, and headquartered in Roseville, MN. producing far-reaching results for our employment. clients.” » Submit People news to kate.hindes@tigeroak.com, and read about more People on minnesotabusiness.com.14 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 16. MASAMI KAWAZATO Type: “…proud fair-weather bicyclist. I’m not comfortable with the snow and ice.” Reasons: “..the savings… And you get to be outside; you’re guaranteed to be doing something active every day.” Destinations: “…work, hair salon, yoga, grocery shopping, downtown, the library, the post office…” Advice: “For any women concerned about wardrobe, I’ve found that you can bike in just about any kind of clothing.”BICYCLING IS UP 52%Have you tried it?Masami Kawazato is part of a huge trend, and for good reason: Bicycling saves youmoney and makes you fitter, stronger, happier and even more energetic. Best of all, bikingto work, school or the store is often as quick as by car for trips under a few miles.Inspiration and ideas at www.bikewalkmove.org! WANT TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT BIKING ROUTES? bikewalkmove.org/plan-your-route Made possible by Bike Walk Twin Cities, a program of Transit for Livable Communities, through the Federal Highway Administration.
  • 17. Intellectualproperty PATENTS & NEW IDEAS FROM AROUND MINNESOTAThe Idea Man MARK KROLLWith over 300 patents, Mark Kroll leads the market on medicaldevice design BY MAURA KELLER In addition to over 300 issued U.S. patents, mostly covering medicalAS ONE OF THE MOST proliic inventors of through my adjunct faculty role in the Biomedical En- devices, Mark Krollmedical devices in the world, Dr. Mark Kroll, gineering Department at the University of Minnesota. has other substan- tial achievementsretired chief technology oicer and senior including:vice president from St. Jude Medical, knowswhat it means to improve peoples’ lives. With Q: What does it mean to you to be the number one patent holder in Min-more than 340 issued U.S. patents under his nesota? » Board memberbelt, about one million human beings have his » Minnesota is a wonderful state with a lot of smart of haemoneticspatents in their bodies. In fact, all implantable people. For decades test scores have placed Minne- (nySe:hae) and taser intldeibrillators sold have at least one licensed sota at the top or in the top few states. To paraphrase (naSd:taSr).Kroll patent. Garrison Keillor, we really are above average. I am not During his tenure at St. Jude Medical, Kroll good at golf, dancing, or singing; so I am very happy » involvement on various privatehelped direct the marketing strategy and tactics for the company’s largest revenue to be good at something. boards includingline—the implantable deibrillator. At this time, the company also was the best per- Medisyn andforming stock of large medical device companies and was twice listed in BusinessWeek as a top ifty performing company across all industries. Q: What are some common misconcep- tions some inventors have about galvani » awarded 2010 Kroll has made a lasting impact on the biomedical engineering ield. With a patents? distinguishedresearch specialty surrounding the efects of electricity on the human body, Kroll » One misconception is that all great ideas have pat- Career achievementis the co-author of ive books and has lectured in more than 30 countries on top- ents. The mountain bike would have had a great pat- award, which isics including deibrillation, invention process, electrical safety and medical device ent, as would have the spreadsheet—but these were the top honorstartups. never patented. Another misconception is that one in biomedical engineering In addition to being an adjunct professor of biomedical engineering at the Uni- has to be an engineer or scientist to get a patent.versity of Minnesota, Kroll also is a distinguished guest faculty for UCLA’s Creativ- My belief is that everyone has at least one invention » fellow of theity and Innovation program. in them. american College of Cardiology Minnesota has earned a solid reputation in the biomedical engineering ield—thanks in large part to ingenious inventors like Kroll. Having been honored by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Oice as a proliic in- Q: What are the most valuable lessons you’ve learned throughout your » fellow of the heart rhythm Societyventor, we interviewed Kroll to gain his insights on the art and science of intellectual career?property. Here’s what he had to say: » Teamwork is more important than brilliance. One » fellow of thing that maturity brings is the realization of how institute of electrical andQ: You’ve had a very distinguished career, having made a pro- found impact on biomedical engineering. What are some of little any one individual knows about our universe of science and technology. I learned that I am the hap- electronics engineersthe key accomplishments that you’ve garnered during your career? piest when I’m doing creative work rather than dis- » Co-editor of four» My answer today is diferent than it would have been 10 years ago. As I look tracted by supervising others. technical texts.back on my career, I now feel best about being married 36 years and raising fourproductive children. Without my supportive wife and loving family, I could neverhave achieved what I did. Q: How does Minnesota compare to other states in terms of inventions. Is » invited lecturer to fda, US patent office, and Mit/ The scientiic accomplishment that I am most proud of is the “Burping Theo- it a fairly ‘inventive’ state? Caltech enterprisery” for the biphasic waveform. This has helped improve deibrillator designs and » Yes, Minnesota is #6 out of 50, according to State- forumimplant techniques; I like to think that this has helped a lot of patients. It is reward- Master, a state comparison site run by Rapid Intelli- » reviewer foring to be consulted on diicult deibrillator implants and to know that I am actually gence, a Web publishing company focused on large six cardiologyhelping a speciic human being achieve a fuller life. educational reference sites and technology. and biomedical journals. I now ind great reward in encouraging and coaching the next generation16 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 18. PATENTED PASSION“Patterson shares my passion. The firmis immersed in medical technology.I bring an idea to Patterson, they dothe rest—and they do it right.”- Mark Kroll#1 IN MEDICAL DEVICE PATENTS WORLDWIDE291 PATENTS AND COUNTING Mark Kroll has a passion for developing technologies that improve and save lives. It’s driven him to become the world’s leader in medical device patents. And when it comes to those patents, his intellectual property law firm is Patterson Thuente. Read more about Mark Kroll, his passion and his Patterson partnership at: WWW.PTSLAW.COM/KROLL 612.349.5740 WWW.PTSLAW.COM
  • 19. In The Black INSIGHT & IDEAS TO HELP YOUR BOTTOM LINE THE EVOLUTION OF ONE DONATION $1 CCRFThe ROI provides helps the U of M secure anOf A Single average of $18 in additional fundingDonation $100,000 Average amount of a seed grant for pilot studies. These grants help researchers secure additionalA small donation to cancer funding to advance treatments for pediatric cancer and other devastating diseases.research, became the catalystfor a partnership that changedthe practice of medicine.BY KRIS VRUNO HUSON Grants of $200,000 and A $10,000 A grant for a pilot And a seed grant $100,000 to explore investment to study of infant for genetic study therapies that target brain study pediatric leukemia yielded of osteosarcoma, tumors yielded additional germ cell $3 million, allowing a bone cancer that funding of $1.365 million tumors yielded researchers to primarily affectsIN 1979, 13-YEAR OLD KATIE HAGEBOECK, and $1.8 million and an impressive conduct the largest adolescents, broughtfrom Wayzata, was nearing the end of her 16-month resulted in an innovative $3.5 million study of infant in an additionalbattle with leukemia. Knowing she was losing her brain tumor vaccine that in additional leukemia in the $2.5 million to the is currently in clinical trial. funding. world. University.battle, she asked that the money she’d been saving fora 10-speed bicycle be donated to a little-known fund (MINNESOTA BUSINESS MAGAZINE)for the University of Minnesota called Children’sCancer Research Fund (CCRF). Her dream was for grants from the National Institutes of Health and the HOW YOU CAN HELP?a cure to be found so that children who followed her National Cancer Institute. These grants signiicantlywould survive. compound the impact of CCRF’s initial investment. Host a Go Play event at your A little over a year after Katie’s passing, her parents, It is estimated that every $1 CCRF provides helps the company, which is a fun way to support cancer research: Info atDiane and Norm, and friends of the family organized U of M secure an average of $18 in additional funding. whodoyouplayfor.org.what they thought was a one-time beneit fundraiser CCRF’s support of research also ills in gaps infor this fund to honor Katie’s dying wish. Thirty two funding for capital expenditures not covered byyears later, the “Dawn of a Dream” beneit is still taking federal grants, educates up-and-coming researchersplace, and CCRF has grown from a small grassroots through the U of M’s Pediatric Hematology-Oncol-fundraiser into a national non-proit, with hundreds of ogy and Blood and Marrow Transplant Fellowshipthousands of individual donors, along with corporate Program one of the largest in the country, and helpsand foundation partners, who have given nearly $70 the U of M attract and retain top-notch researchers bymillion to pediatric hematology/oncology and blood funding endowed chairs. CCRF recently named itsand marrow transplantation physician/researchers at sixth endowed chair the most by any philanthropicthe University of Minnesota (U of M). organization providing funds to the U of M. The partnership between CCRF and the U of M CCRF’s entrepreneurial approach to cancer phi-is unique. CCRF provides a steady stream of unre- lanthropy: Funding innovative, proof-of-principle re-stricted “seed grant” funding that allows the Uni- search, investing in the best young minds and sup-versity’s researchers to pursue early-stage research, porting world-class experts, will continue until Katie’s Walk or run at CCRF’s Time to Flyand bold ideas, that if successful hold great promise dream of a cancer-free world becomes a reality. on June 30th in St. Paul. Info atin getting better treatments to children with cancers childrenscancer.org/timetofly.and other serious diseases. This lexible funding has « Kris Vruno Huson is the marketing and communications manager for Childrens Become a corporate partner byhelped the U of M gain a national reputation for win- Cancer Resarch Fund. contacting Jim Leighton at 952-893-9355ning the increasingly competitive, multi-million dollar or jleighton@childrenscancer.org.18 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 20. Flowers fade. Generosity grows. rd $50 Giving Ca Giving h ere] Card [Your logo $10 [Your lo g o here] Giving Card $25 [Your logo here] GiveMN Giving Cards are the perfect giŌ for employees, vendors or partners. Cards are customizable with your logo and design, 100% tax deductable and available in bulk orders.* Card recipients redeem their card on GiveMN.org and choose from nearly one million of U.S.-based 501(c)3 nonprofits. *e-giving cards also available for individual purchase at GiveMN.org.Order today at:info@givemn.org
  • 21. In The BlackStrongCorporateIntelligenceAlwaysWinsHeartland InvestigativeGroup has built amulti-million dollar businessBY JOHN P. PALENONE OF THE FIRST RULES IN BUSINESS:know your strengths. Another rule: know your weak-nesses. Large companies have entire departments andpersonnel dedicated to corporate intelligence, threatsand weak links. But for small and mid-sized business-es, it’s harder to access this valuable information. Thepeople who do this work tend to keep a low proile.Since 1991, one Minnesota-based company has donejust that; and built a multi-million-dollar business. Heartland Investigative Group has touched justabout every high proile case, story and deal in theTwin Cities. As a private investigator turned entrepre-neur, CEO Paul Jaeb, 47, says that a company focusedon rooting out and preventing the seven deadly sinsin business is a round-the-clock mission. “People areoften in crisis and need our help now,” Jaeb says. Just as importantly, Heartland has capitalized onthe great need for businesses to proactively managethreats and opportunities. Performing more than100,000 background checks, the company alsoprovides competitive intelligence, due diligence, ex-ecutive consultation, research and analysis. All of thiscomes into play before companies make a critical hire,acquire another company, consider a partnership orenter an investment. For large companies, Heartland augments internalcorporate intelligence by gaining inside informationas a neutral third party. Even for small and mid-sized20 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 22. TIPS FOR CORPORATE INTELLIGENCE Performing more BY PAUL JAEB than 100,000 background checks, 1 the company also Don’t be fooled by provides competitive self-reported intelligence, due financials. Verify the diligence, executive assets that consultation, research matter to you. and analysis. 2 Use of background companies it’s essential to understand the value of checks can corporate intelligence. Heartland has discovered reveal a vast things like unauthorized manufacturing of a client’s reality and goods as well as the true inancials, assets and culture truth, even of a potential acquisition target. for people who come One Heartland client called to report that its prod- highly recom- ucts were being manufactured in China. Heartland mended. was hired to ind out by who and where. Another BIZ client wanted to investigate acquisition targets for 3 BRIEFING details such as hours of operation, dock and parking Investigate Heartland lot traic, raw materials quantities coming in, lines of all of your Information production, shifts, etc. This information allowed the options prior Services Inc. to commit- dba Heartland client to calculate the actual output compared to the Investigative ting consider- information that was given. Group able time or Headquarters: In certain circumstances, Heartland also provides money. Be Minneapolis and and trains security personnel. prepared to Denver Inception: 1991 In 2002, Heartland acquired its biggest local change plans Employees: 100 competitor and in 2006 made a strategic acquisition or walk away Revenue: $4.5 from any million in Denver, making it one of the largest corporate, i- deal. Description: nancial and legal intelligence providers in the United premiere States. Paul speaks nationally as an expert in the in- investigators, forensic experts 4 dustry and is the former director of the National As- and agents Balance emo- for corporate sociation of Legal Investigators. tions with intelligence and While some people still believe in and promote the due diligence all the facts. Website: power of a irm handshake, history is painting a new Choose advi- heartlandinfo.com and dangerous story. Jaeb is a symbol of the balance sors without between privacy and public good, trust and betrayal. a stake in the decision. LEADER For business owners, success still appears to low PROFILE from knowing the truth and their own strengths and Paul Jaeb, CEO 5 weaknesses—and then leveraging this information toP H O T O B Y TAT E C A R L S O N has investigated Resistance to both the the 35W make sound business decisions. investigation bridge collapse and Jon Benet could be a red Ramsey murder. flag. Proceed « John P. Palen is CEO of Allied Executives He is currently the (jppalen@alliedexecutives.com) and works carefully with CEO of Heartland with CEOs, business owners and executive uncooperative Investigative leaders on leadership development and Group. individuals or business performance improvement through peer groups, coaching and educational work- organizations. shops. alliedexecutives.com May 2012 minnesotabusiness.com 21
  • 23. In The BlackSteven Ladin Rocks Find out more about RockHis Newest Venture Your Block at: rockyourblock. comFrom LadinVentures to Rock Your Block, Ladin shares hispath to success until years later I realized the true power of those two statements. The owner was not simply doing what he needed to do to pay the bills; he was showing his true entrepreneurial passion by teaching irst-hand that these small yet special concepts can only be learned in real life. « Right: The team Entrepreneurs don’t from Rock Your Block L to R: Steven Ladin: just have responsibility Co-Founder & Chief to their shareholders and Strategy Officer, Sarah Young: Co-Founder their businesses. They & Chief Executive also have an obligation Officer, Caryn Evans: Community Outreach to inspire the millions of Director, John Hibscher: Co-Founder future entrepreneurs who & Chief Technology will carry this world on Officer, (not pictured) Blake Faris: Director of their shoulders by inno- Technology vating commerce and life as we know it today. Ask any successful busi- ness leader how he got started and he will almost always tell you he was inspired by someone close to him. Someone guided him or her in a way that was not just a simple to-do list, but a hands-on, heart-felt expression of giving that was the X-factor between good and remarkable. The moment I heard the 20 second elevator pitch for Rock Your Block for the irst time was the moment I said to myself: This is exactly the opportunity I’ve P H O T O B Y E M I I LY J . D AV I S : P H O T O C O U R T E S Y O F R O C K YO U R B L O C K been looking for ever since I aspired to become a popcorn and lemonade tycoon at the seasoned age of five. Rock Your Block was something I could instantly wrap my head around - I wanted to know more and how I could help build. What are you building?I WAS 14 WHEN MY FRIEND called me nd said Rock Your Block has given me the opportunity to“Steve, do you want to make some money?” I did not build something to truly change the world. Thinkhesitate to say yes due to my desire to add the newest about your irst job, that irst chance to change yourLegend of Zelda game to my collection. He said the thought chemistry and how you might share yourproject would be after school three days a week, four unique insight and experiences with tomorrow’s busi-hours each day, packing stickers into boxes at $5per ness leaders. Hire local teens to do your social mediahour. It wasn’t the most glamorous of activities, but the outreach, your iling, your heavy lifting, reorganizationlessons I learned from my irst day are still embedded of your oice or any other job you keep putting of.in my psyche today. You will be surprised by the impact it has on a knowl- The owner of the sticker company told me two sim- edge thirsty teenager.ple things: First, ind meaning in everything you do;and second, challenge yourself by pushing the limits « Steven Ladin is the Co-Founder of @RockYourBlock, « Above: Teen Job Fair with Hennepin Director of Marketing @Rental_Research and Entrepreneur.that are set before you. I nodded and smiled. It wasn’t County Library Connect with Steven on Twitter: @StevenLadin.22 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 24. 147,903 pounds of cheese curds consumed, 20 Seasons of FUNderful Food! 2012 Home Games May 17-20 July 27-August 2 May 25-27 August 10-15 June 8-13 August 20-22, June 22-24 August 24-27 July 3-10 September 1-3 * Subject To Change July 16-18 Tickets start at just $4 for kids and Fireworks Every $5 for adults Friday! Monster Food Truck Rally Sunday, May 27 Midway Stadium Parking Lot Food, Beer, FUN! Rally begins after the conclusion of the Saints 3:05 p.m. game The event is FREE651-644-6659saintsbaseball.com
  • 25. Bottomline How « Jacquie Berglund with a They innigans beer at Kierans irish Did It pub located in downtown Minneapolis, Local Beer Brand, Finnegans, Raises the Bar $238,000 in charitable donations... and counting BY DANA SEVERSON COMPANY » finneganS HOW THEY DID IT » With a degree in political until 2009 that i was able to move into an actual Science from augsburg College,, Berglund had a oice and hire a staf.” WHAT THEY DO » goal of someday working in international policy. Up until that point (and still today), Berglund relied Charitable beer company after spending a few years in corporate america, on the support of a community of volunteers that WEBSITE » innegans.org Berglund decided to move to france to complete believed in her vision and were willing to dedicate their SUCCESS » Working from her sister’s her MBa and was fortunate to continue her stay time and expertise to further the cause. Since 2000, basement in 2000, Jacquie Berglund with a career in international business. it wasn’t the army has grown to a staggering 1,200 volunteers. set out on a journey to become the irst until several years later, after she returned to “these special volunteers spend thousands of hours beer company in the world to donate Minnesota, that her vision of a socially responsible planning events, pouring beers and doing everything 100% of its proits to charity. twelve beer business began to pollinate. from marketing to sales to operations”, says Berglund, years later, the Minnesota entrepreneur today, finnegan’s is a well-established beer “with only a handful of paid staf, recruiting and retain- is now selling over 72,000 cases of her brand with a mission of turning beer into food. With ing eager volunteers is tantamount to running a suc- local brew per year and has generated many volunteers and a staf of ive, finnegan’s has cessful business.” p h o t o B y tat e C a r l S o n over $238,000 in charitable donations grown distribution outside of Minnesota, with the growing an average of 30 percent year-over-year for local food shelves. in 2011, Berglund beer now being sold in north dakota, South dakota takes more than a community of volunteers. Berglund and her staf of ive hit a milestone by and Wisconsin. Berglund has gone from selling has also had to rely on her passion for social entre- having increased annual sales to over 2,700 cases of beer in her irst year, to over 72,000 preneurship and hustle to further her vision. “We’re $1 million, resulting in approximately cases last year alone. transforming how people look at traditional for-proit 120,000 meals for the hungry. it didn’t come easy though, “we weren’t proit- businesses in society.” Berglund states, “the real ben- able until 2003”, Berglund states, “and it wasn’t eit is feeding more hungry families produce."24 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 26. Thursday, May 24 7:15-9:00amGIVINGTHE BESTTO THE BESTMETHODS TO EVALUATEYOUR TOP PERFORMERSAn effective sales evaluation and compensation strategy will help anybusiness get coveted results from their top talent. Evaluating salesperformance is a fundamental part of business success, and eliteperformers must be recognized and compensated accordingly.PANELISTS:Steve Mihalik, chief revenue oficer at Orange Tree Employee ScreeningLarry Morgan, owner of Orion HR. COST: WHERE: REGISTER: New Membership Woman’s Club, Go to smei.org & Event: $200 Minneapolis and click on events Members: $30 401 Oak Grove Street Non-Members: $50 Minneapolis MN 55403 Students: $20
  • 27. Technology TOOLS, TECHNIQUES AND SYSTEMS OF INTEREST « VinoPad eliminates the guesswork in wine pairing with local menus the description of their wine resulting in less timeVinoPad: Technology spent scouring the shelves for a favorite brand. Guests are not the only ones beneitting from thisMeets Happy Hour hands-on process of wine selection however; res- taurants utilizing Vinopad’s services are reporting an increase of wine sales of 15 to 20 percent due toA new Ipad App is educating and exciting customers diners purchasing more expensive bottles of wine. InBY KEEGAN SHOUTZ addition to sales increase, Vinopad can also be used as a training tool for wait staf that can refer to notes, and ratings which allow more informed decisions to beSINCE THE DEVELOPMENT of the smart Developed by three oenophiles in Minneapolis, made when purchasing by the glass or bottle. Otherphone and tablet, the way we consume has never been Vinopad (http://vinopad.com/) is a wine list and in- eateries are also seeing a decrease in waste and cost tothe same. From stock market analysis to software that ventory management tool for restaurants, wine pro- reprint and update wine lists.connects users with common interests, the social com- ducers, retailers and distributors that automatically For the strategic launch of Vinopad, Lola Red Pub-munity evolves faster than one can jot down the next updates and manages wine inventory. The application lic Relations irst set its sights on the hospitality indus-big thing onto the corner of a napkin. uses cutting-edge technology to digitize and manage try and oenophiles to generate interest and utilize its P H OTO CO U R T E SY O F LO L A R E D P R Thousands of choices consistently greet consum- wine lists, tasting notes, professional reviews and also amenities. Consumer media was also on the publicityers in the application store and marketplace— just ofers real-time information about product availability target list of Lola Red in eforts to drive the public towaiting for the tap of a inger. on a staggering one million bottles. actively seek out and use vinopad’s services in their With launch assistance from the public rela- Decision making is put back into the wine en- new and favorite establishments.tions team at Minnesota-based irm, Lola Red thusiast’s hands by allowing them to physicallyPR, one new and emerging iPad application is view the label and look of the bottle, read reviews,making these decisions a little easier by alleviating ind its point ranking and even discover where to « Keegan Shoutz, Senior Publicist. Lola Red PR services clients on a local, regionalthe middleman for both patrons and restaurants. purchase it at a later date. An email option also al- and national level in the lifestyle andHappy Hour is now a litle happier. lows users to message their friends or themselves consumer segments26 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 28. ®“TDS gives me the powerful, flexible solutions I need to grow my business.” TDS offers economical and flexible voice, data, and managed-service solutions. The benefit to your business: improved convenience and productivity through increased mobility, advanced tools, and versatile features. Learn more at tdsbusiness.com/minnesota. Powerful Business Communications 124868/4-12/7561 May 2012 minnesotabusiness.com 27
  • 29. Captial Market RECENTLY -SIGNED LAWS THAT AFFECT MINNESOTA BUSINESS AND LIFE APRIL BILLS APRIL BILLS SIGNED BY GOV. DAYTON » SF2297 »SF2273 Jacobs law; law Junked vehicles enforcement social eligible buyers services agency expansion notification of child 04/05/2012 abuse requirement 04/04/2012 »SF1809 Hospital com- »SF2084 munity ben- Omnibus correc- efit programs tions policy bill collaboration plans 04/04/2012 evidence-based strategies require- »SF2069 ments elimination; Travel insurance of- health provider fer and dissemina- peer grouping tion regulations requirements 04/04/2012 modifications 04/05/2012 »SF1993 Sump pumps »SF1992 installation licens- Motor carrier ing exemptions contract indeam- expansion nity provisionsRental Property Law 04/04/2012 prohibited. 04/05/2012 »SF1981 Police civilian »SF2173New Policies That Affect Your Business BY NATHAN NELSON review authorities’ uniform proce- Automated drug distribution dures systems authoriza- 04/05/2012 tion; physiciansTHE MINNESOTA LEGISLATURE has en- must require the payment of rent that is approximate drugs dispensingacted legislation that extends protections provided fair market value for the unit, or subsidized by a »SF1793 in health care Health plan facilities located inunder Minnesota Statute § 504B.285 Subdivision federal, state or local subsidy. The tenant of these company definition health professional1a to December 31st, 2014. This legislation protects properties, like any tenant, must continue to abide modification shortage areastenants in a residential real property foreclosure by the terms of the lease to remain in possession of 04/05/2012 04/09/2012setting by preventing foreclosing parties from im- the property. »SF1860 »SF1543mediately evicting tenants after the expiration of the The original legislation limited this provision to Concrete diamond Medical assistanceredemption period. enforcement to the end of 2012. This extension may grinding and saw (MA) community slurry disposal paramedic services Speciically, if the property contains a tenant with cause a strategic shift to lenders who had planned on solid waste exemp- reimbursementa lease term that extends beyond 90 days past the timing their foreclosures to expire in early 2013 to tion for highway coverage authori-end of the redemption period, the statute provides avoid dealing with the tenants. Banks may be forced construction, zation improvement, or 04/09/2012that the lease must be honored by the foreclosing to hold onto properties longer as investors seeking repair activitiesparty (or subsequent purchasers) until the end of vacant units may be forced to either wait for the ten- 04/05/2012 »HF2216the term of the lease. After the lease term expires, an ant’s lease to expire or look elsewhere for properties. Minnesota Com- »SF1934 prehensive Healthadditional 90 days› written notice must be provided Simultaneously, investors seeking properties with Township mutual Association; pre-to the tenant. tenants will ind opportunity. Property management fire company com- mium rate-setting The legislature has attempted to eliminate eforts companies may ind opportunities in marketing to bination insurance process flexibility policies regulations permitted.by foreclosed parties to skirt the system and requires lenders who ind themselves suddenly thrust into modification 04/09/2012that the lease be “bona ide.” A bona ide lease is the role of landlord. 04/05/2012deined under the statute as being a lease wherethe mortgagor, or the child, spouse, or parent of the Find out more about the newest laws and « Nathan Nelson, Esq. is a founding partner of Virtus Law in Brooklyn Park, legislation by going to: revisor.mn.govmortgagor is not the tenant. The lease must be the MN. Nelson specializes in business andresult of an arm›s length transaction and the lease individual law.28 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 30. Join premier networking & leadership for the us breakfast series of the Twin Cities. Presented By: Single Tickets: $20 Register at www.goodleadership breakfast.com Spring 2012 Series Theme: Personal & Professional Planning Hosted at Minnesota Valley Country Club, 6300 Auto Club Rd. Bloomington, MN 7:15 – 8:45 AM Created and hosted Friday, April 27 by Author, Speaker Scott Andersonand Executive Coach: CEO of Patterson Companies Paul Batz Why the learning 18 stops: Friday, May never Sue Mulkern a glimpse into my development journey VP of Human Capital, OptumHealth How my personal convictions are shaping Friday, May 18 at OptumHealth work/life wellness Sue Mulkern VP of Human Capital, OptumHealth How my personal convictions are shaping work/life wellness at OptumHealth
  • 31. Marketing MARKETING, PUBLIC RELATIONS, COMMUNICATIONS AND MEDIA D B IN G O — Authentic Giving — B U Z Z WO R What it means to truly believe in your charity Fast Synergy BY STEVE WEHRENBERG Leverage Track THIRTY YEARS AGO I met Ray Mithun, our agency’s founder and a member of Bench- the Advertising Hall of Fame. In my years Strategic mark with the company, one of Ray’s quotes Interface has stayed with me each day. “There is no lasting success, happiness or reward unless a person is truly useful—useful to his family, to his business and to his community.” Ray Game Streamline was saying that giving back means getting Touch back. It was true yesterday and it’s even Plan Base truer today. Every brand and every organization needs to be able to answer the question: What’s your cause? At our business, we Campaign for Clarity proudly support the United Way. For the past seven years, Campbell Mithun has supported Greater Twin Cities United Way by developing its annual advertising. Our re- Stop Leveraging my Synergies BY KIM OPITZ cent “Every ONE Counts” campaign helped the organization raise nearly $90 million for Twin Cities’ nonprofit agencies.We also had a tremendously energetic and fun internal giving campaign. Last year three employ-IF YOU MUST KNOW, I was leveraging my own slowly. Try a diferent way of saying it—or better yet, if ees, including one woman, agreed to shavesynergies late last night. First, I optimized my brand you’ve hired a creative agency and they start throwing their heads for contributions.alignment. Then I empowered and streamlined my leverage into the strategery, make them stop. The key to making corporate socialmessaging. And inally, I got some buzz. responsibility work is that each facet of the If you must know, it was a rather authentic position- ASK FOR MORE DETAILS: campaignfit your corporate culture and reflect your brand’s values. Now more thaning experience. » How are you going to leverage ever your employees and customers want In the Star Trek universe, microsingularities are our consumer base? authenticity. They will only identify withteeny, tiny black holes—as theorized by the Vulcans. » What do you mean by leveraging your social mission if it is true.They don’t actually exist (let’s not start ighting about our brand equity? One of the best brands at living outthat already, okay?) » What does that translate to in social responsibility is our Compass Point deliverables and dollars? Media client, Chipotle. They are all about But in the business world? Oh, they exist, my friend. Food with Integrity, an idea that links theirMicrosingularities exist and thrive, in the dark dank corporate values, marketing messages,pages of overwrought marketing proposals. In loud, If no one knows the answers, they probably sourcing and social responsibility efforts. It’stinny reverberations in our heads when we cling to the didn’t think beyond the word leverage itself. So their cause and it’s a cause that’s authentic.safety of the predictable. don’t spend a dime until you know what kind of I’ve had the distinct privilege of learning corporate values from Ray. For Campbell We call them buzz words. Personally and profession- leverage they’re proposing, and what that means to Mithun’s future success, we pride ourselvesally, I think we should do ourselves favor and toss them your bottom line and campaign results. in being successful not only to our share-aside for more clarity. Because the more they pop into You just might save yourself the agony of seeing your holders, but within our communitiesour discussions and proposals, the more we get side- marketing dollars sucked up by a microsingularity. as well.tracked by glittering generalities. « Kim Opitz is a creative agency « Steve Wehrenberg is CEO of Look. I’m totally ine if you want to leverage exper- Campbell Mithun, an instructor in the veteran and owner of Rribbitz Creativetise, relationships or knowledge. But every now and Communications. She enjoys leveraging U of M’s strategic communications multi-colored highlighters for graduate program and co-author ofthen—please. Set the leverage down and back away synergestic strategic development. The Successful Marketing Plan.30 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 32. 9:03 a.m.10:34 a.m.11:18 a.m.A lot happens between9 and noon.Countless life-shaping events occur between nine and noon.And a lot happens every day on The Daily Circuit. Host Kerri Miller and Tom Weber cover the mostimportant issues and interview newsmakers of all kinds: politicians, authors, innovators, educators,artists and everyday people in the news.Listen weekdays 9 a.m. to noon.Stay connected all day at mprnews.org#dailycircuit
  • 33. Marketing Crisis Communications in the Age of Twitter The best policy is pro-activity and active listening. BY PAUL MACCABEEENDURING THE INFERNO OF A CRISIS from therecall of a product to a consumer boycott, has always been ahumbling experience, but at least in the past companies hadthe luxury of time to respond. Today, fueled by 800 million slime,” which went viral with 1.3 million YouTube views, fol- lowed by ABC News’ blog post “70 percent of Ground Beef at Supermarkets Contains ‘Pink Slime’ “ exploding across the Web. And witness the speed with which United Airlines 5 DON’T BE AN ONLINEusers of Facebook, 175 million devotees of Twitter, 500 mil- was overwhelmed by 11.6 million views of a video, “United OSTRICH: RESPONDINGlion viewers on YouTube and blogs read by more than 345 Breaks Guitars,” posted by an outraged customer. And BEFORE THE CRISIS LIVES FOREVERmillion people, the velocity with which a company’s reputa- The good news? Here’s how those same online channels » In the era of Twitter andtion can be blown apart by an online crisis is breathtaking. which can bring down a company’s good name in the time it Facebook, you no longer have Consider how quickly the beef industry was overcome takes to ire of a 140-character tweet, can help your company the option of hoping a crisis will blow over before your companyrecently by chef James Oliver’s TV segment about “pink respond to a crisis with unprecedented speed: responds. Consider that six years ago, bloggers were abuzz when a customer popped open a Kryp- tonite lock by inserting a Bic pen. DARK SITES AND ONLINE CHANNELS: Today, that story about vulnerable PREPARING FOR THE INEVITABLE Kryptonite locks still comes up » Don’t start your company’s social media engagement the day your fourth in Google Search for the CEO is perp walked through your lobby by the FBI. Before a crisis hits, brand. Search for the words BicLISTEN UP! build your social media infrastructure: a branded YouTube channel, Twit- Kryptonite and you’ll get 1.2 mil-» Monitoring Conversa- ter feed and company blog — the quickest way to respond, in kind, to lion results with titles like, “Twisttions About You Online a Pen, Open a Lock.” As of this online critics. If your company has advance warning, you can prepare a issue date, the “How To Unlock a“You can’t fight what pre-loaded, not-yet-public response “dark site,” which can be switched on Kryptonite Lock with a Bic Pen”you can’t see,” sing to provide video and supporting documents and images. video on Youtube has receivedthe rock band Girls 234,000 views.Against Boys. And What did the company doyou can’t defend your 3 4 wrong? Kryptonite, which hadreputation if you don’t known about the problem formonitor what the online two years before it was exposed,world says about your refused to reply to a call fromcompany — before, Wired magazine, which reportedduring and after a crisis. PAY RATHER THAN CRISIS ALA YOUTUBE the company’s silence. ContactedHow can you determine PRAY—USING PAID » YouTube is an essential crisis response tool, by the New York Times, theif that nasty blogger CRISIS TOOLS relying the emotional, human side of your advo- company defended itself byis a lone malcontent cacy when it’s needed most. But if your spokes- »Sponsored Tweets can keep saying “that locks made by otheror a highly-influential person responds to a crisis on YouTube, make links to your company’s rebuttal manufacturers shared the samefigure in your industry? sure he or she acknowledges the issue you’re high at the top of Twitter search vulnerabilities.” Your lesson?There are more than facing head-on. Check out Domino’s president results. You can even buy paid Respond quickly and honestly, Patrick Doyle, whose YouTube-distributed450 online monitoring search terms on Google (such or your reputation will be apology for renegade employees who violatedtools available, from as “Disgraced Minnesota CEO” barbequed on the Web for years, health code standards was straight-forwardGoogle Alerts and Social or “Radioactive Chocolate”) and candid. Rather than attack online critics, even decades, to come.Mention to Trackr , which will not go active until Domino’s thanked the blogging communityViral Heat, Alterian and you pull the switch; that way, for alerting his company to the outrage.Radian6. Klout, and consumers searching for an Finally, help consumers find your response « Paul Maccabee is explanation of your crisis willTwitalyzer can analyze video by adopting the words they’ll actually also have a prominent link to president of Maccabee,negative tweets, while use to search. Domino’s actually titled one of its a Minneapolis-based your response where they canAlexa and Compete can response videos “Disgusting Dominos People public relations, learn your side of the story. corporate communica-evaluate the prominence —Dominos Responds.” A Domino’s PR executive Don’t forget to review your ad tions and social mediaof websites posting got it when he said, “Domino’s owns all of its copy, to ensure your company’s marketing agency. Contact himnegative mentions of trademarks, but we don’t own the Domino’s at paul@maccabee.com or visit messaging isn’t newly distaste-your company. brand. Our customers do.” maccabeegroup.com. ful given the current crisis.32 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 34. Every centkid-spent.
  • 35. Giving Back A look into the contributions & partnerships of Minnesota Organizations “When I chased after money, I never had enough. When I got my life on purpose and focused on giving of myself and everything that arrived into my life, then I was prosperous.” » Wayne Dyer In 2011, Give To the Max Day raised over $13.4M for charities nation-wide. In fact,for every dollar invested in the 2011 Give to the Max Day event, $45.53 was returned to Minnesota nonproits. The beneits of giving back inancially are documented time and time again. In this issue of Minnesota Business, we celebrate and acknowledge those who give both inancially and physically. Please join me in thanking all the organizations that make Minnesota a better place to live, work and play. Kate Madonna Hindes Editor In Chief Minnesota Business Magazine kate.hindes@tigeroak.com34 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 36. P H O T O B Y E M I LY J . D AV I S « Passionate Leader: Mary Jo Copeland, (Director of Sharing and Caring Hands) May 2012 minnesotabusiness.com 35
  • 37. * GIVING BACK * A “Hands-On” Difference Companies large and small discuss the ways giving has beneitted their organizations BY DAN EMERSON THROUGH ECONOMIC BOOM and downturn, one constant has been Minnesota companies’ tradition of corporate community service. Last year, for the ifth year in a row, the Twin Cities was rated #1 in volunteering by the Federal Govern- ment’s Corporation for National and Community Service. Calculating the number of volunteer hours Minnesota compa- nies contribute to their communities and listing the many ways their employees give back is an inspiring task. While the large, high-proile charitable events sponsored begin. Morine points out; even those employees who don’t volunteer may be making a by major corporations may receive the most attention, contribution. “Those who stay back and work doubly hard to allow people to get away small and mid-sized employers are just as committed to (to volunteer) also beneit the company, and others.” giving back, says Sue Moyer, manager of the Greater Twin “A lot of it is the tone and expectation set by the owner of the company,” says Morine, Cities United Way Caring Connection. “Companies of all noting that, early on, company founder and CEO Mike Patterson “clearly stated a pref- sizes have been learning by example from larger corpora- erence for volunteering and challenged everybody to get involved.” tions that have successful volunteer programs, and realiz- ing the beneits those programs can ofer to the company, employees and the community,” Moyer says. WELLS FARGO LEADS THE PACK Along with the obvious beneits to society and the Leaders set the tone, but they don’t dictate, says Wells Fargo CEO John Campbell. “greater good,” those beneits include helping companies “The beauty of volunteerism is that it springs up naturally from the energy and passion bond within the community, and helping employees bond of our team members; it’s really important that it not be a top-down mentality involving with the company and with each other. corporate mandates. We’re letting our team members make decisions about where they One small-company example is King Solutions, a sup- want us to be involved and what they want to accomplish. It’s a lot of people putting in a ply chain irm, based in Dayton, Minn. lot of hours doing a lot of interesting things." The 92-employee irm supports a number of causes Campbell also noted, “Increasingly, we ind that our team-members have a passion including the Food Shelf Network, United Way and ARC for a cause, outside of their family and their job. That might be an educational organiza- of the Twin Cities. To everyone’s beneit, volunteering to tion, health care or social services." As one example, Wells Fargo’s Somali hunger-relief help others is a self- motivating activity, says Jenni Morine, efort originated with a African-born employee’s concern for his homeland. King’s HR manager. “Volunteering gets in your blood; Campbell cites the company’s “ability to leverage our infrastructure to make volunteer once you start it’s hard to stop.” activities available. In any given month we have 20 to 25 volunteer opportunities post- With a well-established employee volunteer program ed, so the beauty of it is you don’t have to twist anybody’s arm to get them involved.” that supports a number of causes, King Solutions’ desire is In each market where it has a presence, Wells Fargo maintains volunteer councils that to attract those who may not have the resources and con- provide the organization and coordination essential to making volunteer events hap- nections but want to help; they just don’t know where to pen. Even though volunteerism originates at the grassroots level, “it still requires a36 minnesota BUsiness May 2012
  • 38. Last year, an estimated great deal of organization.” 52,665 Wells Fargo For Wells Fargo, another employees contributed more than 1.5 million beneit of volunteering is volunteer hours to that it often gives employees various causes, an 11 chances to develop leader- percent increase over ship skills that they may 2010. The IRS estimated the value of those not get the opportunity to community eforts at develop in the workplace, $32 million. Campbell says, using his own career as an example. “My leadership skills have developed as much externally as internally. I had fairly im- portant leadership roles within the Cancer Society, United Way and Boy Scouts before I was a manager at the bank.” Wells’ most unique ofering in this category may be its Volunteer Leave program, where employees can apply to receive pay for up to four months for their chosen charity. “It really allows team members to go well beyond normal « Ecolab group volunteering at Second Harvest Heartland volunteer capabilities and do something really meaning- ful,” Campbell notes. “For us, it’s a really nice demonstra- tion to team members that we value their volunteerism.” skill-sets to help community organizations and individuals. Providing pro bono legal advice has SMALL COMPANIES long been standard practice for law irms, but the same tradition has also been adopted by other EMBRACE GIVING professional groups in areas such as accounting, public relations and marketing. Minnesota companies have been bringing to community “There have been more companies requesting ‘skilled volunteering’ engagement,” says the causes the same kind of innovation they use to gain market United Way’s Moyer. “They realize they have talented employees who can make a signiicant share and boost their bottom lines. One strategy used by impact in the non-proit community.” Walter White, CEO of Twin Cities based Allianz Life In- both large and small employers is using corporate inancial surance Co. of North America agrees. “Giving employees opportunities to share their expertise resources to support the volunteer activities of employees with the community seems to have particular appeal.” and their families. Burnsville-based Hollstadt & Associ- One of the largest skills-based volunteering program is the United Way’s “Claim It!” pro- ates developed its annual Big Give awards to assist causes gram, which provides free tax-preparation services to low-income families, under a partnership favored by its employees, clients and consultants. The with local accounting irms, the IRS, Minnesota Department of Revenue and other agencies. management consulting irm donates $50 for every hour Another growth area is helping community groups develop sophisticated marketing tools (in- someone volunteers for a charitable cause, up to $400 per cluding websites and social media) and strategies. person and a maximum of $25,000 for the program. In that vein, the Twin Cities United Way recently announced a new initiative to bring to- Another trend is the growing popularity of “skilled gether companies seeking skilled volunteering opportunities together with deserving recipi- volunteering,” in which employees use their professional ents, Moyer notes. » CORPORATE VOLUNTEERISM COUNCIL —TWIN CITIES One local organization that has been corporate volunteerism and help improve activities in their locales. They can alsop H OTO CO U R T E Sy O F E CO L A B key in building corporate volunteerism, our methods,” says Ecolab’s Shannon contact the agency, recruit volunteers particularly in the small-business sector, Toren, current CVC president. and keep track of their volunteer hours is the Corporate Volunteerism Council– Another useful resource is United Way of online. Last year, the Connection brought Twin Cities (CVC-TC). It was established the Twin Cities’ Caring Connection, which volunteers together with nearly 50,000 in 1980 as one of the first CVCs in the matches people to volunteer projects opportunities, says Sue Moyer, Caring nation; today, there are nearly 100 CVCs with United Way community partners Connection manager at Greater Twin located across the U.S. Its 44 corporate across the nine-county metro area. Cities United Way. The data base lists partners include both large and small Using the Volunteermatch.org website, “everything from servings meals to the local companies. “The purpose is to individuals, companies or other groups homeless, to skill-based opportunities, to learn from each other, track the trends in can access a list of hundreds of volunteer fix-up projects,” Moyer says. May 2012 minnesotabusiness.com 37
  • 39. * GIVING BACK * A LOOK AT GENERATIONAL GIVING DEBRA ARBIT, CEO and TIME-EFFICIENT VOLUNTEERING onto delivery trucks, White says. “Every employee feels generational expert with Companies have also come up with innovative solutions that he or she is actively participating. You can see the Minneapolis-based consulting firm to enable employees struggling to balance work and fam- enthusiasm and engagement on their faces and feel the BridgeWorks, offers some advice ily responsibilities make the most of the time they have spirit around the building, along with the impact on the on how to maximize volunteer participation among different available to give back. A number of Twin Cities irms organizations we’re supporting.” generations in the workplace. have created online portals to match employees with “The oldest generation, the volunteer opportunities that it their interests, talents traditionalists who were born be- and schedules. ONE-TO-ONE ACADEMIC HELP fore 1946, is still very avid about Another trend has been the development of so-called On a Monday evening at RBC Wealth Management’s volunteering for the greater good,” Arbit says, noting that “speed volunteering,” in which companies ofer their Minneapolis oices, employees provide one-on-one they tend to favor programs with employees volunteer projects they can take on during a tutoring to academically at-risk students from Anwatan a more traditional, top-down, lunch hour, or after work, like spending an hour assem- Middle School.Tutoring and mentoring high school command and control structure. bling packages of donated food, gifts or laundry soap. and middle school students is another popular way for Even though people are living E-mentoring, in which employee volunteers build help- employees to contribute, says Martha Baumbach, direc- longer in retirement, Arbit says companies often overlook their ing relationships with middle or high school students tor of corporate and community relations for Minneap- retirees as willing resources for using e-mail, is another time-saving innovation. “If em- olis-based RBC Wealth Management. Under the irm’s volunteer causes. “This gen- ployees don’t have much time, but want to give back, we partnership with Anwatan Middle School in North eration is still very avid about ind a solution,” according to Ecolab’s Shannon Toren, Minneapolis, on Monday nights Anwatan students iden- volunteering, so make sure you the irm’s manager of community relations. tiied as academically at-risk are brought to RBC head- are asking them.” Baby boomers “are still the Allianz’ well-developed volunteering program is a quarters, where RBC employees provide one-to-one most idealistic and optimistic representative example, doing a number of things to get tutoring. As another time eicient way for employees to group; they genuinely believe employees engaged in volunteering, according to CEO volunteer, the irm also does “e-mentoring” _by e-mail they can make a difference.” Walter White. Those include encouraging employees – with middle schools kids in the Minnetonka-Wayzata A boomer may seek a second to serve on the boards of organizations they support, school district. RBC also ofers inancial support for career not because of job dissatis- faction, but because of a desire to and providing each employee with eight hours of paid volunteer hours employees may want to spend, she says. make meaningful contributions, time-of annually for volunteering. Another efective In the todays market, with companies reducing Arbit says. “These volunteer tool is the company’s Mad Money program: when ive workforces and striving to do more with less, have they activities can be great opportuni- or more employees participate in a volunteer event, Al- been forced to cut back on community involvement? ties for them to do that.” lianz contributes $100 per employee to that cause, up to That has not been the case, according to local leaders; Generation Xers “are often skeptical of institutions, including a maximum of $500. a number of companies have only stepped-up their non profits. But they do care. So Allianz maintains long-term strategic partnerships volunteering eforts. In fact, over the past ive years, St. if they are asking you ‘Why are with local nonproits engaged in two areas linked to its Paul-based Ecolab’s volunteer program has grown by we doing it this way?’ you need corporate mission:Helping students develop inancial more than 400 percent, with employees contributing to embrace their skepticism and literacy, and service to seniors. “We’ve been very fo- over 80,000 hours volunteering in their communities, answer their questions_ which are probably very smart ques- cused on employee engagement in the community and Toren says. tions.” Another key point is that we think that is part of what has made us successful par- “We have never taken the approach of cutting-back,” for Generation Xers “sometimes ticularly in diicult economic times,” White says. “Every says White,. “If anything, we have gone in the other di- extracurricular, volunteer activi- year we have more employees involved.” rection. Every year, our inancial contribution increases ties can give them opportunities White says a key feature of Allianz’ volunteer program and more employees are involved.” The company’s to take leadership roles that will help them in their careers.” is an employee steering committee which chooses a charitable eforts were cited as one of the factors that Regarding the youngest group handful of primary community causes the company will landed it on Fortune magazine’s “100 Best Places To of workers, the Millennials: “They support in a given year. In 2011, more than 3,400 hours Work List,” he notes. “We’ve been very focused on em- might not be in position to donate were contributed equaling more than $73,000 in volun- ployee engagement in the community and we think that money, but they can give back teer help to area nonproits. is part of what has made us successful, particularly in by getting involved in causes. A nice way to get to get Millennials One unique, signature event occurs each holiday diicult economic times.” involved is not to dictate to them, season at Allianz as employees ill gift boxes for needy but rather let them get involved families and form a “human chain” to load the boxes GIVING BACK CONTINUED » on their own,” Arbit advises.38 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 40. * MN Give By The Numbers $48 million Dollar amount of donations since inception. More raised than Facebook Causes! Causes started in 2007 and has raised $40 million for causes so far. We started in Nov. 2009 and have raised $48 million (through 12/31/2012). Established November 2009 Give to the Max Day events in November 2009, 2010 & 2011 2,500+ 6,100+ $153.94 NUMBER OF Number of nonprofits that have received a donation through GiveMN THE AVERAGE GIFT NONPROFITS TRAINED since inception (of the 8800 active MN ON GIVEMN.ORG nonprofits, defined by GuidestarUSA) (Based on average of all donations IN ONLINE FUNDRAISING made since inception) 145,000 TOTAL NUMBER OF DONORS 29+ Funding partners make GiveMN possible $100,000 Amount of the largest donation through GiveMN.org $1= $45.53 For every dollar invested in the 2011 GIVEMN HAS A PAID STAFF OF 2.5 PEOPLE. Volunteers Give to the Max Day event, $45.53 was and partnerships makeSOURCE: GIVEMN returned to Minnesota nonprofits. everything possible. (MINNESOTA BUSINESS MAGAZINE) May 2012 minnesotabusiness.com 39
  • 41. * GIVING BACK * Standing OutMinnesota Business celebrates those who have inspired others to give BY MAURA KELLER MOST OF US ARE NO STRANGERS TO THE WORLD OF PHILANTHRO- PY. We’ve been asked to lend our time and inancial support to various charitable causes. We are often solicited by groups to help combat various diseases, construct new build- ings or save the rainforests. For many causes, business professionals are the cornerstone of these eforts, participating in philanthropic initiatives and nonproit endeavors that are impacting those in need throughout Minnesota and beyond. YOUNG MIND, BIG DREAMS ready to be shipped to schools, hospitals and non- Eleven-year-old Maria Keller, founder of Read Indeed, proit organizations; both national and international. is one such person who is engaging members of the While schools, religious organizations, commu- Minnesota business community in her nonproit nity groups and individuals have supported Maria literacy initiative, Read Indeed. Based in Hopkins, Read Indeed was founded three years ago, when Keller learned of the lack of books in the homes of low- “It’s amazing to see how income children and the role this plays in their future quickly we get things school performances and future successes. “There are done and how much fun so many kids who aren’t ready for kindergarten be- cause they’ve never owned a book or had a book read everyone has sorting to them. Our volunteers know they are doing some- and boxing the books. thing good for someone else and I think that makes They learn about the them feel really great. huge need for children’s “I decided I wanted to get books into the homes of as many children as possible,” Keller says enthusias- books right here in tically. “I made the goal of collecting and distributing Minnesota.” one million books to kids in need by the time I’m 18.” One million books. An amazing number, consider- with charitable contributions, book drives and volun- ing the determination and age of the nation’s youngest teer eforts at the Read Indeed warehouse. Business non-proit leaders. Keller is getting closer to achieving volunteers also have played a huge role in Maria’s this number as she recently collected her 600,000th eforts, joining a young girl in her vision to improve book in a warehouse teeming with boxes of books children’s literacy.40 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 42. P H O T O B Y TAT E C A R L S O N « Maria Keller, young leader extraordinaire and founder of ReadIndeed May 2012 minnesotabusiness.com 41
  • 43. * GIVING BACK * Here’s why: Business volun- teerism can be a quadruple win. Everyone involved has something to gain—the companies that pro- vide the employee volunteers, the organizations where employees vol- unteer, the wider community and the employees themselves. Such eforts ofer a low-cost, low-risk, high-impact way of bringing the knowledge, skills and experiences of the business sector accessible to the non-proit sector. It also builds understanding, employee skill and community goodwill. TOUCHING LIVES Experts agree that business profes- « Starkeys mission is awareness, sionals who volunteer ind their education, protection and treat- ment of hearing loss. experiences inspiring, empower- ing and sometimes life changing. They are giving the opportunity to practice service and compassion for From collecting books to fitting hearing those who need it most. For example, look at Orion As- aids to packaging meals that will be shipped sociates, a Minnesota social services to all corners of the world, Minnesota agency and Headwaters Relief Or- ganization, the nonproit the Orion companies and their employees are doing organization established to promote great deeds for those in need. and support volunteerism. The agency has always sponsored group volunteer projects and provides paid time of for volunteerism. P H O T O C O U R T E S Y O F T H E S TA R K Y H E A R I N G F O U N D AT I O N As part of Cargill’s commitment to corporate responsibility, one of its corporate “In addition to our disaster relief work, our em- missions is to “invest in and engage with communities where they live and work.” In ployees volunteer regularly through other agency the past year, the Tartan Evolution team at Cargill has chosen on two occasions to sponsored group volunteer projects, including Toys volunteer at Read Indeed, counting, sorting and packing books. for Tots, Feed My Starving Children, the Susan G. “Many teams at Cargill, including my team, have made a commitment to partici- Komen Race for the Cure and Multiple Sclerosis pate in several service projects each year,” says Angelica King, senior IT consultant walks,” says Cheryl Vennerstrom, chief operating at Cargill. “I personally believe that volunteering beneits each of us individually and oicer, at Orion Associates and Headwaters Relief our team as a whole. Each of us has learned more about literacy and the importance Organization. of literacy in building strong communities. Moreover, while volunteering at Read Several years ago Orion established an agency Indeed our team has found a double beneit of giving back and team building. The goal of 90 percent participation of its management environment at Read Indeed allows team members to work together in an open en- and administrative employees in volunteer activi- vironment conducive to trying new tasks, talking with each other and having fun.” ties. Employees can participate in agency spon- From 3M to Target and General Mills, businesses of all shapes and sizes have sored events, disaster relief or projects and events donated their time, collected books and donated funds to Read Indeed, helping hun- of their own choosing. dreds of thousands of young children. “In 2011, 97% of our employees engaged in a42 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 44. volunteer activity, with an overall average of 2.75 Haiti Outreach:events per person,” Vennerstrom says. “Dr. Re- How Technologybecca Thomley, chief executive oicer, believes Enabled Successthat a truly successful organization is one that is notonly successful in its line of business, but is suc-cessful as a contributor to the community and the Businesses naturally take advantage ofworld. She holds to the value that business can be technology to share information. Their nonprofit counterparts can learn to ap-a catalyst for creating positive change in the com- proach their ‘business’ with the samemunity. Employees who give to the community are attitude: utilizing the tools they have tofar more capable of giving to the organization’s cli- achieve results.ents, their co-workers, and to the organization as awhole, serving all with the skills they have acquired Haiti Outreach, a nonprofit focusing on community-managed, sustainable wa-through their work on volunteer projects. Being ter and education programs in Haiti, isplaced in positions of leadership over a group of one organization making strides in the Two months later Haiti Outreach chosevolunteers has helped many to rise to the occasion arena of technology. the GiveMN.org platform for its annualand become true leaders. They return to their work Deep Freeze Dunk event. Teams of in-in the organization with honed skills beneiting all I first learned of Haiti Outreach after dividuals raised money simply through the 2010 earthquake that hit the small outreach to their personal social chan-whom we serve. It is without a doubt, that as a re- country of Haiti. Like many nonprofits, nels, e-mailing and phone calling.sult of the volunteer opportunities we’ve provided it lacked an online presence and unfor-for our employees, the company has developed a tunately missed a valuable opportunity Most recently Haiti Outreach attemptedfar more capable, dedicated workforce.” in the immediate rush for aid for the vic- its biggest effort to date – merging its Giving back to others is a huge component of tims of the earthquake. Lacking prepa- online and offline communities with ration and an online community, its op- both a social media strategy and a tra-Starkey Hearing Foundation, part of Starkey Hear- tions were limited. Haiti Outreach had ditional phone-a-thon. Using  GiveMN.ing Technologies, a privately held, global hearing operated for nearly 15 years without org  and backed by a matching dona-technology company headquartered in Eden Prai- needing to have its finger on the pulse tion of $10,000, it raised $26,250 onrie, Minnesota. As part of the company’s role in of technology, now it became clear the World Water Day, enough for nearlygiving back to people and volunteering themselves, world around it had gone global.  three clean-water wells.they created the Foundation in 1982 when founder Realizing it needed a new way to reach One Success at a TimeBill Austin and his team of audiologists began giv- potential community, donors and ad- Haiti Outreach is transforming howing the Gift of Hearing to underprivileged children vocates, in the spring of 2011, Haiti it operates. The successes it has wit-and adults who cannot aford hearing devices. From Outreach initiated strategic planning nessed encourages continued invest-2000 to 2010, the Foundation it more than 500,000 and careful implementation of a social ment in technology like social media media strategy. With limited resources, and online marketing to grow its orga-hearing aids to people in need domestically and in- it needed to be clear about its goals nization and create a sustainable pres-ternationally. Annually, they are dedicated to giving and how much it would realistically ence in its marketing, communications100,000 hearing aids and are dedicated to itting be able to invest in building an online and fundraising efforts.more than 1 million hearing aids this decade.  community. When Starkey heads out on a mission, there are Just like the small country it serves, Online Vehicle for Capital Haiti Outreach may have a long roadvolunteers that attend and travel as a team to far and After building an online community ahead– yet the early successes shownear destinations.  The size of the mission dictates for six months, Give to the Max Day that there is much to be hopeful about.the number of audiologists needed at the mis- 2011 was the perfect vehicle for Haitisions. At some missions there could be 35 people Outreach’s first attempt to fundraisebeing itted and others include more than 100 peo- online. Armed with a plan that would « Nicole Harrison is the president and founder stretch their comfort zone, the team set of SocialNicole, a Minnesota-based businessple being itted.  The Foundation and team was in a fundraising goal that felt attainable helping connect businesses and nonprofits withHaiti recently for a mission and o in Israel and Pales- yet pushed them to work hard. Using the resources they need to achieve innovative andtine for a mission that took place in late February, creative solutions. The SocialNicole team crafted primarily e-mail and social media tools, the strategic plan that Haiti Outreach successfullywhere they itted 1,000 people. Haiti Outreach succeeded in reaching deployed in its online fundraising efforts.   its initial goal of $10,000 for one clean- water well. A huge success. GIVING BACk CONTINUeD » May 2012 minnesotabusiness.com 43
  • 45. * GIVING BACK * Unlimited Potential Tasks Unlimited creates corporate partnerships and job opportunities with incredible results BY RACHEL HICKOK CORPORATE GIVING CAN TRANSFORM A COMMUNITY. Like many other non-proits, corporate partners provide much-needed inancing and resources to one of Minnesota’s growing non-proits. Tasks Un- limited ofers job training for individuals with diagnosed mental illnesses. It equips its staf with the ability to provide the best possible services for client sites and jobseekers. Eight-ive percent of people who come to Tasks Unlimited are unemployed. Tasks Unlimited has been able to slash the number down to zero percent, through a passion for creating a better future for those with mental illness. Minnesota companies make this possible through corporate giving and foundation grants. With the help of funding from the Otto Bremer Foundation and Wells Fargo Foun- causes of poverty in the community, ofered inancial dation of Minnesota, Tasks Unlimited is able buy much needed equipment for its support to Tasks Unlimited’s Jobs Training Pro- teams to bring on site to client workstations. In addition, Tasks Unlimited is able to gram. Armed with $35,000 in funds, Tasks Unlim- train more people and provide contracted janitorial, grounds maintenance and mail ited was able to continue training people who were room operation services to businesses much more eiciently because of established ready and willing to work, thus reducing the long partnerships and strong relationships. With its ability to get each individual back to wait and assisting more people to become inancially work in a resourceful and dignity-driven way, Tasks Unlimited is changing the face of stable, thereby reducing the burden on state and mental illness in Minnesota. county social service budgets. “Like anyone, Tasks’ clients desire stable long term employment with good wages. They’re proud of their ability to be self suicient and active members of their com- munities and we’re proud of them.” says Executive Director Karen Johnston. “Tasks Unlimited has Tasks Unlimited also provides job training and housing to adults who have seri- ous mental illness. Upon completion of a Tasks Unlimited training program, gradu- changed the landscape ates continue their transition to supported employment through Tasks Unlimited of unemployment for Building Services (TUBS), a social enterprise that provides green cleaning, grounds maintenance and mailroom services to businesses. TUBS contracted businesses not those it serves.” only receive award-winning services, but they make a diference in the community by providing job opportunities to people often dependent on others for their inancial Not only did corporate giving provide Tasks Un- welfare. Many clients have worked their entire careers with TUBS, earning a solid limited the opportunity to put people to work, the job history and fair wages. “Clients who complete a Tasks Unlimited job training program also gave the organization new resources to program pay taxes, use fewer social services and their re-hospitalization rates are al- work more eiciently for its social enterprise custom- most non-existent, a huge savings to the tax payer,” states Rachel Hickok, marketing ers. With the help of the Wells Fargo Foundation Min- manager of Tasks Unlimited. nesota, Tasks Unlimited was able to purchase a John With funding for job training and mental health services decreasing in the recent Deere Gator for one of its contracted work sites. market, the demand for services is closely reaching a three-year wait. Tasks Unlimited The purchase of the Gator allowed workers to looked to other sources to ensure it could continue to train and employ adults, while transport janitorial equipment from building to helping the Minnesota economy. building at contracts with large open spaces and The Otto Bremer Foundation, with its commitment to address the underlying multiple buildings. It improved the eiciency and44 MINNESOTA BUSINESS May 2012
  • 46. TASKS UNLIMITED WHO THEY SERVE Number of people served in 2011: 307 Number of people currently employed by organization (clients and staff): 338 Number of Contracts and work sites: 13 Contracts plus 3 additional work sites « Tasks Unlimited Executive Wages paid to Director, Karen Johnston disabled workers poses with a piece of equip- in 2011: ment they received from the Wells Fargo Foundation. $2.5 MILLION quality of the services clients provided and contributed to the long-term suc- ofer more hours to existing clients while op- cess of the relationship between the contracted work sites and Tasks Unlimited erating a competitive business. Tasks Unlim- Services provided: ited Building Services is actively seeking new Green Cleaning, Building Services. The purchase allowed TUBS to maintain a competitive Grounds edge while staying true to its mission to employ people with disabilities. In this opportunities to partner with corporations Maintenance, instance, corporate giving beneited the individuals the social service agency to provide business services. The company Mailroom serves as well as the organization’s corporate client. is also looking at diversifying the services it ManagementP H O T O B Y E M I LY J . D AV I S “The Gator has been a huge asset to our building services team, streamlin- currently ofers. ing work and giving us the ability to work more eiciently. We can’t thank Wells “We want to help more people get on their Website: Fargo enough. We wouldn’t have been able to aford this great piece of equip- feet. Our clients are excited to work, but we need tasksunlimited.org ment without its help,” says Johnston. corporations to partner with us. The corpora- Looking ahead, Tasks Unlimited’s biggest challenge will be to continue to tion receives great service and our clients get a provide jobs for people with mental illness. As part of a new strategic plan for chance to be self-suicient. It’s a huge win for 2012-2014, the organization is focusing on how to employ more people and our entire community,” says Johnston. May 2012 minnesotabusiness.com 45
  • 47. Seen NETWORKING, BUSINESS AND AFTER-HOURS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 P H OTO S BY D E R E K LU N D M A R KSocial Media Breakfast 1) An attentive crowd (2) L-R Meghan Wilker, Nancy Lyons, Meg Knodl (3) L-R MeghanSMBMSP #44 – Interactive Project Management Wilker, Nancy Lyons, Mykl Roventine (4) Crystal Grobe,Kristin Lenander (5) Mary Lower,Over hundreds of attendees came together to hear Mykl Roventine (6) Sara Masters, Gayle Haugen (7) Braden Stadlman, Johnny Thompson,Meghan Wilker and Nancy Lyons from Geek Girls Amanda OlesonGuide present their newest book and methodologies.View the video online at: smbmsp.org46 MINNESOTA BUSINESS April 2012
  • 48. » To submit photos for Seen: Email kate.hindes@tigeroak.com 1 2 3 4 5 6 7P H OTO S CO U R T E SY O F O L S O N (1) An elevator shaft, transformed. Pictured here: Jen Rorke, Account Director, Olson (standing), Andy Gray. Partnership Olsons Open House Marketing, 1:1, Olson (standing) (2) Anne Hofer (HSBC), Virginia Kafer (Olson), Jennifer Bodine (Olson) and Mary Ellen Olson + Co held an open house at Pardell (Best Buy). (3) The Olson build out was part of the overall restoration of the historic structure and the design the Ford Center in March, celebrating team worked to balance the historic significance of the building with the needs of Olson. (4) Agency founder John new space and on-going success. Olson. (5) The Cafe space is anchored by a large family style table in the center of the cafe. The south end of the cafe uses historical graphics of the building create a connection to the past and a glass wall that can fold away creates a seamless connection to the stage area. Framed by the large opening to the 10th floor- this area will be the place for all agency gatherings and new rituals. (6) Anne Michaletz, Senior Account Executive PR, Olson Chicago with Mary Clare Jensen, Account Supervisor, Olson Minneapolis. (7) Client Lugert, Art Director, Olson April 2012 minnesotabusiness.com 47
  • 49. Closers REFLECTIONS ON MINNESOTA BUSINESSES CONGRATS! Weber Shandwick Honored the Minneapolis oice of Weber Shandwick was honored recently with eight awards, including industry Campaign of the year, at the Minnesota public relations Society of america (prSa) 34th annual Classics awards. the Classics awards recognize public relations campaigns that demonstrate extraordinary creativity and execution, including research, implementation and measurement. 3 Stations Up For Crystal Radio Awards the national association of Broadcasters (naB) recentlyCelebrating Success announced inalists for the 25th annual Crystal radio awards, the organization’s recognitionThe WomenVenture team gathered to celebrate monthly of radio stations for outstanding year-round commitment toemployee wellness challenge successes. community service. all three of hubbard radio’s twin Cities- based stations—KSTP AM, KSTPABOUT WOMEN VENTURE: From left to right—back row: Brian hasty, operations Manager; elizabeth FM and KTMY FM—were namedWomenVenture is a nonproit petry-lee, Career development Manager; Michael Kithcart, Chief operating inalists for the industry honor.organization dedicated to helping oicer; Katy Burke, Business Consultant; Mary Briel, employment Specialist;women of all ages, cultures, Judy hawkinson, director of philanthropy; Stephanie Stuart, Women Can do the stations, otherwise known as it! Manager; Chris olsen, Marketing Manager. 1500 eSpn, KS95 and mytalk107.1,races and income levels achieve From Left to right—front row: Jackie Starbird, assistant to the president; are three of only 50 total inalistseconomic success through classes alyssa Samuelson, loan fund Coordinator; deb Wilkens-Costello, president;and services on entrepreneurship for the Crystal radio awards trish Bosquez, finance Manager; amy Keegan, Women’s Business Centerand career building. and the only inalists from the director; Jennifer Briggs, Client Services advisor. (Not pictured: Amber Waldo, Staf Accountant; Ann Mays, Volunteer Director; Carlye Rooney, Minneapolis/St. paul market. Grants Manager; Elizabeth Goers, Client Services Advisor.) PARTING WORDS “Ive always said that the better off you are, the more responsibility you have for helping others. Just as I think its important to run p h oto By d e r e K lU n d M a r K companies well, with a close eye to the bottom line, I think you have to use your entrepreneurial experience to make corporate philanthropy effective.” >> CARLOS SLIM HELU How do YOU plan on Giving Back in 2012? Wed love to hear from you. kate.hindes@tigeroak.com48 MINNESOTA BUSINESS April 2012
  • 50. BUSINESS CAN’TWAITTO CONNECT TO THE CLOUD.PC Mag has named Comcast Business Class the fastest business Internet provider in the nation. It offers downloadspeeds up to 66 times faster than DSL and T1. Plus, you’ll get productivity tools such as Norton™ Business Suiteand Web hosting options along with a dedicated local customer service team ready to help you 24/7. Switch toComcast Business Class.Go to business.comcast.com or Call 800.391.3000Restrictions apply. Not available in all areas. Speed comparison between Comcast 100Mbps service and standard 1.5 DSL or T1 (downloads only). Actual speeds vary and are notguaranteed. 2011 rating by PC Mag based on review of customer data from www.speedtest.net. Call for details. Comcast © 2012. All rights reserved.
  • 51. Extra mile. Law irms talk about “going the extra mile” all the time. At Barnes & Thornburg, we’d rather walk it than talk it. we staff your matters with less leverage and more partner involvement. we approach your business in an eficient, uncommonly predictable way. And we put in the effort to ind the practical, workable solutions to your most complex business challenges. To us, going the extra mile isn’t about distance—it’s about results. btlaw.comAT L A N TA CHICAGO DeLAwAre INDIANA LOs ANGeLes mICHIGAN mINNeApOLIs OHIO w A s H I N G T O N , D. C . 2 2 5 s. s I x T H s T r e e T, s u I T e 2 8 0 0 | m I N N e A p O L I s, m N 5 5 4 0 2

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