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Executive Summary Year Three (FY 2009-2010) Progress and Outcomes Weed and Seed Community: Long Beach Police Beats 4 and 5
 

Executive Summary Year Three (FY 2009-2010) Progress and Outcomes Weed and Seed Community: Long Beach Police Beats 4 and 5

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The Long Beach Weed and Seed Collaborative is a community-based strategy sponsored by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) that offers an innovative, comprehensive multi-agency approach to law ...

The Long Beach Weed and Seed Collaborative is a community-based strategy sponsored by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) that offers an innovative, comprehensive multi-agency approach to law enforcement, crime prevention, and community revitalization. The City of Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Community Health oversees the Weed and Seed five-year grant under its Health Promotion Division. This document was submitted to the Weed and Seed Steering Committee on November 15, 2010. As the then Co-Chair of the Steering Committee, Lydia A. Hollie, JD/MAED, was a key informant for this document.

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    Executive Summary Year Three (FY 2009-2010) Progress and Outcomes Weed and Seed Community: Long Beach Police Beats 4 and 5 Executive Summary Year Three (FY 2009-2010) Progress and Outcomes Weed and Seed Community: Long Beach Police Beats 4 and 5 Document Transcript

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    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! INTRODUCTION: The Long Beach Weed and Seed Collaborative is a community-based strategy sponsored by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) that offers an innovative, comprehensive multi-agency approach to law enforcement, crime prevention, and community revitalization. The City of Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Community Health oversees the Weed and Seed five-year grant under its Health Promotion Division. Weed and Seed is foremost a strategy—rather than a grant program— that aims to prevent, control, and reduce violent crime, drug abuse, and gang activity in designated high-crime neighborhoods across the country. The Long Beach Weed and Seed strategy evaluated in Central Long Beach addresses Police Beats 4 and 5: Los Angeles River to the west; Hill Street to the north; Cherry Avenue to the east; and Anaheim Street to the south. Before Weed and Seed intervention began, the target area in Central Long Beach had consistently experienced the highest levels of crime in the City of Long Beach. The target area has a population of 45,887, and a large youth population under the age of 21, with 22,575 youth living within the target area’s 2.02 sq mile radius. The ethnic make up in the designated site is 55% Hispanic, 17% African American, 17% Asian, 5% Caucasian, 3% American Indian, 1% Native Hawaiian, and less than 1% Other. Cambodians make up a large percent of the Asian population. The target area also experiences the highest concentration of poverty in the City of Long Beach. Thirty-seven percent of residents in the target area zip codes 90806 and 90813 are living below poverty level, with median household income at $21,728, and 52% earning less than $15,000 annually. Furthermore, 46% speak Spanish, and 34% are non-citizens. There are 11,624 households in the target area; 81% of residents rent, 19% are owners, and there are 1,017 vacancies. The national Weed and Seed strategy involves a two-pronged approach: law enforcement agencies and prosecutors cooperate in "weeding out" violent criminals and drug abusers and public agencies and community-based private organizations collaborate to "seed" much-needed human services, including prevention, intervention, treatment, and neighborhood restoration programs. A community-oriented policing component bridges the weeding and seeding elements. The Weed and Seed strategy is a multilevel strategic plan that includes four basic components: law enforcement; community policing; prevention, intervention, and treatment; and neighborhood restoration. Four fundamental principles underlie the Weed and Seed strategy: collaboration, coordination, community participation, and leveraging of resources. Promoting the long-term health and resilience of the community is a true goal of Weed and Seed, so sustainability must be a key part of a sites structure. The foundation for sustainability involves maintaining the steering committee as a mechanism for ongoing implementation of the Weed and Seed strategy beyond the life of the grant and identifying and securing existing and new resources and funding sources. The Long Beach Weed and Seed Collaborative (referred to as "the Collaborative") offers several benefits to its partners. The Collaborative is made up of a diverse network of law enforcement, city ! I!
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! agencies, community organizations and residents working together towards the common goal of reducing violent crime, gang activity, and drug abuse in the target area, and offering social services to build and strengthen the health and long-term resilience of the community. Tools designed to increase resident participation, such as, the City of Long Beach DHHS Weed and Seed Comprehensive Services Guide and the Weed and Seed Monthly Calendar assist partner organizations to reach out and educate the public about social services offered in the target community. Furthermore, the City of Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services offers valuable technical assistance to the Collaborative, including covering the cost of permits (which provides an in-kind resource to partner agencies looking for space to serve the target community) and linking partner organizations to academia through graduate intern assistance (which aids organizations in fine-tuning their practices and tailoring them to meet the needs of the target area). Additionally, the Collaborative has helped many partner organizations to leverage funds to continue and expand those social services that are in alignment with the Long Beach Weed and Seed goals and objectives (A list of funds leveraged through Weed and Seed is available in Appendix B of the full-length evaluation report). This report represents the executive summary of a full-length evaluation completed on the Long Beach Weed and Seed Strategy after its third year of implementation. This executive summary contains both outcome and process evaluations for each of the Long Beach Weed and Seed Subcommittees (Please see the Long Beach Weed and Seed Overview below). The outcome evaluation reviews the extent to which Weeding and Seeding Strategies have statistically achieved the goals and objectives stated in the Long Beach Weed and Seed Strategic Plan for Year Three of grant implementation. These numbers were provided by law enforcement and other partner organizations engaging in weeding and seeding strategies within the target area. The Long Beach Weed and Seed Programs’ process evaluation was informed by key informant interviews and will analyze the Collaborative’s successful implementation of Weeding and Seeding strategies in terms of collaboration, coordination, the leveraging of resources and community participation. This summary will also include recommendations for ensuring the sustainability of Long Beach Weed and Seed efforts moving into Year Four of Strategy implementation. >BCD!?EFGH!=EEI!FCI!)EEI!8JBDJFK!9LEJLMEN! 6LM!-**#(.&4*#!4&(!-*N5,4.#+!)$(!C4#O;$P! 6.#$5*#!*0!9$4:,!4&(!9;84&!<$#=.5$%+!Q*&!G#.4%! C4&42$#!-*88;&./!9$4:,!3;#$4;+!),$#$%4!C4#.&*! -*N5,4.#!4&(!-*88;&./!Q$%.($&+!6#R!1/(.4!9*::.$! "#*2#48!-**#(.&4*#+!)#45/!-*:;&24! "#*2#48!G%%.%4&+!<45$/!-,#.%$&%*&! =EEIMCD!)OJFOEDMEP! !SFKT!*0!U;&(%V! )EEIMCD!)OJFOEDMEP!SFKT!*0!U;&(%V! >$%!6.=.%.*&! 3$4%!E!W!F! ! J!
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! LAW ENFORCEMENT OUTCOME DATA: The following description of law enforcement outcomes refer to full years 2008 and 2009, as these years include the most complete data since strategy implementation began in October 2007. Baseline data is considered those numbers reported for full-year 2007. Goal 1: Reduce Narcotic Activity Drug related arrests have decreased significantly over the past two years, with a net decrease of - 39%. Although the measure for reduction of narcotic activity was an increase in arrests for Year Three, targeted enforcement (in which there has been an increase in drug warrants and operations) appears to be having an effect sooner than expected at the time the measure was written. The idea is that during the first few years of Weed and Seed Strategy implementation, arrests should be on the rise due to targeted enforcement; however, since Strategy implementation, narcotic arrests have been declining (-5.4% change in 2008 and -35.5% change in 2009). Nevertheless, the number of narcotic related calls for services have also been declining (with a net decrease of -41%), which suggests that the reduction in arrests is actually due to a reduction in narcotic crime in the target area. Goal 2: Reduce Violent Crime Violent crime related arrests and incidents have decreased significantly over the past two years, with a net decrease of -7.3% for arrests (-14.6% change during 2009) and -13.4% for incidents (-2.9% change during 2009). An increase in violent crime operations, which have at minimum doubled since grant implementation, appear to be reducing violent crime in the target area at a rate greater than expected since at this point in time it was expected that arrests would have increased. However, the number of violent crime incidents has declined along with arrests, which shows that violent crime has been reduced in the target area consistently since the Long Beach Weed and Seed Strategy began (see graph on next page). ! X!
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! NIKR[T! ;EO!Q!$HFCDE!233R52334.! G##$%%+!NYRXT! Z&5.($&%+!NIXRET! Goal 3: Reduce Nighttime Loitering: During the first year of Strategy implementation, law enforcement far exceeded is expectation to increase nighttime loitering citations by 5% by actually increasing citations by 118.4%. Perhaps the strategies implemented in Year One yielded a higher increase of citations which favorably impacted the issuance of citations during the following with a reduction of -60.8 %. As a corollary, the number of citations during 2009 was less than the number of citations in 2007 prior to Strategy implementation, which suggests that the need has decreased for nighttime loitering citations in the target area. Indeed, nighttime loitering citations have decrease a net of -14.4% over the last two years. The number of nighttime loitering task force operations was not recorded by law enforcement over these past two years but is presently being recorded for 2010. ! E!
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! Gang-related Statistics: Law enforcement has met and exceeded its expectation to increase arrests of gang members citywide over the past two years, with a net increase of 19.7% (and an increase of 14% in 2009). Although the measure reads “gang arrests for violent crime,” law enforcement does not discriminate this information as thus numbers represent gang arrests for all crimes. However, gang- related calls for service are available by police beat, and have decreased since strategy implementation in 2007. Truancy-related Statistics: The measure for truancy includes both citations and arrests because these are considered the same numbers by law enforcement (e.g. an arrest is always accompanied by a citation, even though a citation is not always accompanied by an arrest). During the first full year of strategy implementation, truancy citations/arrests increased by 62.1%, and then decreased by -2.4% in the target area. Average daily attendance at Butler Elementary, Washington Middle School, and Poly High School have increased from the 2008 –2009 school year to the 2009 – 2010 school by 1.66%, 1.12%, and .38% consecutively, although these increases are not statistically significant. It is difficult to determine whether truancy citations/arrests are down due to less truancy in the target area. Truancy citations/arrests may be down because there were no targeted truancy operations reported for 2009, whereas six truancy operations were reported the previous year when truancy citations/arrests were high. Graffiti-related Statistics: The number of arrests for graffiti offenses has decreased a net of -28.5% over the past two years of strategy implementation (with a decrease of -11% in 2009). The number of graffiti operations has remained steady during this time. The number of graffiti-related calls to law enforcement has also declined over the last two years, with a net decrease of -29.8% (-13.5% during 2009). The decrease in both graffiti offenses and calls experienced over the last two years suggest that graffiti-related incidents have decreased in the target area. 2010 Weeding Predictions: An attempt to measure Weed and Seed’s progress towards achieving law enforcement outcomes in 2010 was made by comparing half-year 2009 LBPD statistics (January 1st – June 30th) to 2010 year-to-date statistics (January 1st - June 30th). The graph shows that 2010 year-to-date “Violent Crime Incidents” numbers are fairly equal to the number of “Violent Crime Incidents” reported for half-year 2009, but for all other categories, citations/arrests are down when comparing 2010 YTD numbers to the same time period in 2009. Hence, these numbers forecast that the 2010 full- year data has a reasonable likelihood chance of remaining lower than the 2009 full-year data, and that the Weeding Strategies are continuing to achieve their target outcomes. ! F!
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! WEED SUBCOMMITTEE: 905!:%(6;!*0).6%!1%2$C!>$%&()!*(&$%&+,!! "#$%&()!*(&$%&+,!! -.$?!0/!905!:%(6;!*(&$%&+,!! 1&45!"/0&6%3%$!A%6$.0!! ! ! -()./0&.(!1%2(&$3%$!0/!*(&0)%!! ! 1%2(&$3%$!0/!I%()$;!(8! <(5!"/0&6%3%$!A%6$.0!! 1&45!"/0&6%3%$!783..+$&($.0!! I43(!A%&B.6%+!! G&(//.6!A%6$.0!! 905!:%(6;!-()<=>*! 1%2(&$3%$!0/!*4D).6!J0&K+! H04$;!A%&B.6%+!A%6$.0!! 97!-04$?!1%2(&$3%$!0/!! F//.6%!0/!$;%!-.$?!*&0+%64$0&! !!!!!!-;.)8&%!(8!@(3.)?!A%&B.6%+! 97!-04$?!1%2$C!0/!*&0D($.0! 97!-04$?!1.+$&.6$!7$$0&%?E+!F//.6%!!! ! Outcomes for Goals and Objectives: Statistical data provided by law enforcement (described thoroughly in the previous section) shows that narcotic, violent crime, nighttime loitering, and graffiti crime statistics have been reduced in the target area (Police Beats 4 and 5) since strategy implementation in October of 2007 and is evidence that Weeding strategies are being implemented effectively. Coordination and Collaboration: • Interviews with the Long Beach Weed and Seed Safe Haven Park Directors, Subcommittee Co- chairs, the Steering Committee Co-chair, and Site Director confirm that law enforcement has actively engaged with city agencies and community organizations to develop strong relationships through community policing strategies. They recognize positive changes in resident-police relationships in the target community due to these efforts. • Law enforcement officers have been actively involved in the Long Beach Youth Leadership Program activities, Helpline Parent Empowerment classes, and the Community Peace Garden. • Law enforcement has been a strong presence in Weed and Seed Collaborative efforts with consistent attendance at Steering Committee meetings and community events. • During January’s Peace Week, fifty youth participated in the youth-police dialogues, made possible through collaboration and coordination among the Long Beach Weed and Seed Youth ! !
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! Leadership Program, California Conference for Equality and Justice (CCEJ) and the Long Beach Police Department. Recommendations for Sustainability during Year Four: • Engage the participation of key city and community organizations already listed as part of the Weed Subcommittee. It has been reported that there are presently five organizations or departments actively participating on the subcommittee, whereas thirteen representatives were originally established when forming the subcommittee. It is important to assess which of these organizations are important to reengage in order to improve the efficiency of Weeding efforts through improved collaboration and coordination in the community. • Continue to strengthen community-police relations to promote sustainability of Weeding efforts in the target community. Focused interventions in collaboration with community organizations engaged in Seeding strategies, such as youth-police and community-police dialogues, should be continued and expanded to achieve this goal. Furthermore, continuing to support and strengthen police involvement in other Weed and Seed sustainable efforts, such as the Long Beach Weed and Seed Youth Leadership Program, Helpline Parent Empowerment Program, and the Community Peace Garden, will support the longevity of community policing strategies in the target area. ! Y!
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! FAMILY ENGAGEMENT AND VIOLENCE PREVENTION SUBCOMMITTEE: The Family Engagement and Violence Prevention Subcommittee (FE&VP) serves to fulfill grant objectives listed under the prevention, intervention, and treatment component of the Weed and Seed Strategy. This component concentrates an array of human services in the target area and links law enforcement, social services agencies, the private sector, and the community to improve the overall quality of services to residents. In order to better coordinate violence prevention efforts in the target community, the Family Engagement and Violence Prevention Subcommittee is a hybrid of the Long Beach Gang Reduction, Intervention, and Prevention (Long Beach CalGRIP) Advisory Council and the Weed and Seed Collaborative partner organizations. With the same target area, similar goals and objectives, and shared partner organizations, these collaboratives decided to merge into one subcommittee to spearhead family engagement and violence prevention efforts in the target community. Please see below for a chart of the Family Engagement and Violence Prevention Subcommittee’s makeup and accomplishments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`&.0.$(!<5,**:!6.%#.5! 6$74#8$&!*0!-,.:(#$&!4&(!U48.:/!<$#=.5$%! ! "$45$"4#&$#%B!Z&5R! U4.,N34%$(!-*::4?*#4.=$! ! ! ! <R!C4#/a%!C$(.54:!-$&$#! 9$:7:.&$!]*;,!-*;&%$:.&2! ! ! ! <;7$#.*#!-*;#!*0!-4:.0*#&.4B!-*;&/!*0!1*%!G&2$:$%! ! ! ! [!
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! Outcome Data for Goals and Objectives: Statistical data provided by city agencies and nonprofits in the Collaborative shows that educational, social and economic/life skills training and career preparation activities for youth and adults are being implemented in the target community to meet the goals and objectives stated in the Long Beach Weed and Seed Grant. Please see the full-length report for details. Coordination and Collaboration: Examples of successful coordination and collaboration by the FE&VP Subcommittee during Year Three of the Long Beach Weed and Seed strategy include: • Coordination with youth-serving organizations to offer free trainings and services to youth in the Weed and Seed Youth Leadership Program, including the Boys and Girls Club, YMCA, The State of the Art Project, and The Long Beach Shakespeare Company; • Coordination with Helpline Youth Counseling to provide Parent Empowerment Classes in English, Spanish and Khmer and integrate best practices for how to empower and teach skills for parents to be effective leaders at home and in community settings; • Coordination with the City of Long Beach Department of Parks, Recreation, and Marine to use its Recreation Hall and other facilities for community events and classes, at no cost to the Collaborative; • Partnership with the University of California Los Angeles to engage a graduate level intern who provided technical assistance to the Subcommittee as a well as a link to academia to inform the development and implementation of Subcommittee efforts. • Leveraging the Long Beach Weed and Seed Youth Leadership Program in planning and outreach efforts to increase youth participation in the Youth and Police Dialogues, coordinated by California Conference on Equality and Justice (CCEJ) in partnership with law enforcement in the target area; • Partnership with the LBUSD to inform the Subcommittee’s Truancy and School Connectedness Conference planning and reinforce its implementation, along with a variety of its other collaborating partners: Los Angeles Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS), Los Angeles County Probation Office, the Faith-Based Collaborative and other community-based youth and family-serving organizations; Community Participation: • Engaged several city and community organizations in the collaborative efforts described above. • Spearheaded Weed and Seed efforts to strengthen resident involvement in the target community through its Youth Leadership and Parent Project Programs. • The Long Beach Weed and Seed Youth Leadership Program has connected youth to volunteer opportunities in the community, including youth assistance to Weed and Seed staff in the organization and implementation of community empowerment events and neighborhood restoration activities. • Youth have participated in Long Beach Weed and Seed Steering and Subcommittee meetings, offering a youth-based perspective on problems in the community and providing information that will be utilized in the planning of future Weed and Seed interventions, including the Truancy and School Connectedness Conference. ! b!
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! Leveraging of Resources: The FE&VP Subcommittee’s successful efforts to coordinate and collaborate with various organizations in the target community contributed to the leveraging of resources to strengthen violence prevention and intervention activities. Examples of the leveraging of resources through FE&VP Subcommittee efforts have been listed above. In addition, the Long Beach Weed and Seed Program was able to leverage $39,300 in funds for its Youth Leadership Program, provided by the Leadership Long Beach Connected Corridor Project ($14,000), State Farm Strong Neighborhoods Grant ($5,000), Kaiser Permanente Violence Prevention Grant ($5,000), and Long Beach CalGRIP Youth Beautification Project Grant ($15,300). Recommendations for Sustainability during Year Four: • Carefully review and utilize the publication “Developing a Sustainability Plan” by the Community Capacity Development Office to address each dimension of sustainability (Structural Effort, Community Impact, and Resource Development) and their indicators in planning interventions over the next two years. • Develop strategies to accomplish the stated goals and objectives for family engagement and violence prevention in the Long Beach Weed and Seed Strategic Plan for Year Four. • Continue to align FE&VP goals, objectives, and intervention efforts with those of the California Endowment Building Healthy Communities Initiative outcomes and logic models since the California Endowment will be a funding source in the target area for the next ten years. Furthermore, the California Endowment has shown interest in funding the continuation of both youth and adult advocacy in the target area using the Long Beach Weed and Seed Youth Leadership Program and Neighborhood Action Council models. • Utilize the Parent Project Program administered by Helpline Youth Counseling to increase adult resident participation in Long Beach Weed and Seed activities and leadership opportunities on the FE&VP Subcommittee. • Continue to strengthen relationships with the Long Beach Unified School District and Faith- based Collaborative, and build relationships with the business community. • Continue to strengthen partnership with the Long Beach Police Department to improve community-police relations through Youth and Police and Community and Police Dialogues. Dovetail these Dialogues with the Conflict Resolution Workshops offered by PeaceBuilders as a way to teach community youth and adults how to respond to conflict without resorting to violence. • Utilize partnerships with city agencies such as Long Beach Department of Parks, Recreation and Marine, Long Beach Unified School District, and community nonprofit organizations to leverage resources and expand youth mentoring opportunities in the target area. ! IK!
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! REENTRY AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT SUBCOMMITTEE: The Reentry and Workforce Development Subcommittee serves to fulfill grant objectives listed under the prevention, intervention, and treatment component of the Weed and Seed Strategy, especially those pertaining to the reentry population. This subcommittee may work closely with the Family Engagement and Violence Prevention Subcommittee as many of their objectives are closely related. Similar to the Family Engagement and Violence Prevention Subcommittee, the Reentry and Workforce Development Subcommittee is a hybrid of the Long Beach Gang Reduction, Intervention, and Prevention (Long Beach CalGRIP) Advisory Council and the Weed and Seed Collaborative partner organizations. With the same target area, similar goals and objectives, and shared partner organizations, these collaboratives decided to merge into one subcommittee to spearhead reentry and workforce development efforts in the target community. Please see below for a chart of the Reentry and Workforce Development Subcommittee’s accomplishments to date. <;?5*88.$$!C$8?$#%+! -G!6$7R!*0!-*##$5.*&%!4&(! !!!!!Q$,4?.:.4.*&!!!! -$&$#!0*#!>*#_.&2!U48.:.$%! -$&#*!-9GB!Z&5R! -./!*0!1*&2!3$45,! !!!!H$.2,?*#,**(!<$#=.5$!3;#$4;!! -*88;&./!Q$%.($&%! 6$7R!*0!9$4:,!4&(!9;84&!<$#=.5$%! !!!Q*:$!*0!C$&!"#*2#48! 6$74#8$&!*0!";?:.5!<*5.4:!<$#=.5$%! ^**(c.::!*0!<*;,$#&!1*%! !!!!!G&2$:$%!-*;&/!S<L1G-V!! 1*%!G&2$:$%!-*;&/!"#*?4.*&! "#*=.($(!?/!6$7R!*0! !!!!6$74#8$&! ! ";?:.5!<$#=.5$%d! 1*&2!3$45,!-./!-*::$2$! 4=4.:4?:$!4!-$&$#! 1*&2!3$45,!-./!"#*%$5;*#a%!L00.5$! 0*#!>*#_.&2!U48.:.$%! 1*&2!3$45,!1$24:!G.(!U*;&(4.*&! 1*&2!3$45,!"*:.5$!6$7R! "$45$"4#&$#%B!Z&5! ! Outcomes for Goals and Objectives: Statistical data provided by city agencies and nonprofits in the Collaborative shows that educational, social and economic/life skills training and career preparation for youth, adults and the reentry population are being implemented in the target community to meet the goals and objectives stated in the Long Beach Weed and Seed Grant. Please see the full-length report for details. Coordination and Collaboration: Examples of successful coordination and collaboration by the Reentry and Workforce Development Subcommittee during Year Three of the Long Beach Weed and Seed strategy include: • Partnerships with organizations who serve the reentry population, the faith-based community, and employers to inform the development of the Subcommittee’s Comprehensive Reentry Services Plan. ! II!
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! • Partnership with the University of Southern California to engage a graduate level intern who provided staff support to the Subcommittee as well as linkage to academia to inform the development and implementation of Subcommittee efforts. Leveraging of Resources: The Reentry and Workforce Development Subcommittee’s successful efforts to coordinate and collaborate with various organizations in the target community contributed to the leveraging of resources to assist in the development of its Comprehensive Reentry Service Plan. The Reentry and Workforce Development Subcommittee was able to leverage partnerships and staff support from its graduate intern to apply for the Reentry Employment Initiative Technical Services Grant from the U.S. Community Capacity Development Office. The Subcommittee was awarded the grant in March 2010 to assist with development of the Comprehensive Reentry Services Plan. Community Participation: • Engaged several city and community organizations in the collaborative efforts described above. • Engage the community through the annual Community-wide Expungement/Sealing Education Workshop and monthly expungement workshops. • As the Comprehensive Reentry Services Plan is completed, a point person will be designated to engage the reentry population in the Plan, so that they can be connected to services that aid in a seamless transition back into society. Recommendations for Sustainability during Year Four: • Carefully review and utilize the publication “Developing a Sustainability Plan” by the Community Capacity Development Office to address each dimension of sustainability (Structural Effort, Community Impact, and Resource Development) and their indicators in planning interventions over the next two years. • Develop strategies to accomplish the stated goals and objectives for reentry and workforce development in the Long Beach Weed and Seed Strategic Plan for Year Four. • Continue to strengthen relationships with current partners and build new partnerships with organizations that serve the reentry population, the faith-based community, and potential employers. • Completion of the Comprehensive Reentry Services Plan is a major sustainability effort that will provide a framework for drafting policy on how reentry employment issues can be addressed in the target area and citywide. • Continue to provide the Community Forum on Juvenile Petitions, Expungement and Certificates of Rehabilitation and monthly Expungement Workshops, as these are two services under the Reentry Services Plan that are not readily available elsewhere and provide a valuable and sustainable resource for the reentry population in Long Beach. • Continue to facilitate focus groups to inform the creation of the Comprehensive Reentry Services Plan. Key constituents to participate in the focus groups include: male/female parolees and probationers, employers, and faith-based organizations. ! IJ!
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! NEIGHBORHOOD RESTORATION SUBCOMMITTEE: The Neighborhood Restoration Subcommittee serves to fulfill grant objectives listed under the Neighborhood Restoration component of the Weed and Seed Strategy. Through coordinated use of federal, state, local, and private-sector resources, neighborhood restoration strategies focus on economic development, employment opportunities for residents, and improvements to the housing stock and physical environment of the neighborhood. Please see below for a chart of the Neighborhood Restoration Subcommittee and its accomplishments to date. <;?5*88.$$!C$8?$#%+! -$&#4:!H$.2,?*#,**(!G(=.%*#/!-*;&5.:!S-HG-V! -*88;&./!Q$%.($&%! 1*&2!3$45,!`&.0.$(!<5,**:!6.%#.5! U4.,N34%$(!-*::4?*#4.=$! H$.2,?*#,**(!G(=.%*#/!^#*;7!SHG^V! H$c!^$&$#4.*&%! ! Outcomes for Goals and Objectives: Code Enforcement and Nuisance Sites: Statistics provided by the Code Enforcement Department show that code enforcement violations in the target zip codes 90813 and 90806 have increased significantly over the past two Weed and Seed fiscal years (from 2,306 in Year Two to 4,291 in Year Three, an increase of 86.1%). Similarly, statistics provided by the City of Long Beach Neighborhood Nuisance Abatement Program show that nuisance sites in the target zip codes 90813 and 90806 have increased significantly since last fiscal year (from remaining at 11 nuisance sites Years One and Two, and increasing to 23 nuisance sites during Year Three of Strategy implementation). These outcomes may be the result of successful neighborhood restoration efforts to educate the target community about calling the code enforcement and nuisance abatement hotlines to report violations. By Year Four of strategy implementation code enforcement and nuisance violations should begin to decrease as residents learn about such violations and take greater pride in the ascetics of their neighborhood. ! IX!
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! Graffiti: Separate from the full-year data available through the LBPD for graffiti incidents in Police Beats 4 & 5, the Long Beach Department of Community Development is able to report graffiti incidents based on the Weed and Seed Grant’s fiscal year. This data shows a net reduction in graffiti incidents of -48.1% since Weed and Seed Strategy implementation in October of 2007, with Year Three experiencing the greatest decrease over the three-year span of -32.7%. Therefore, both law enforcement and community data confirm that graffiti incidents have decreased in the target area since initiation of the Weed and Seed Strategy. Collaboration and Coordination: Examples of successful coordination and collaboration by the Neighborhood Restoration Subcommittee and its Peace Garden Committee during Year Three of the Long Beach Weed and Seed strategy include: • Strong partnerships with city agencies and local business to leverage resources and establish the Peace Garden. • Partnerships with city agencies, nonprofit organizations, and the Faith-based Collaborative to plan and implement community empowerment events. • Partnership with the California State University Dominguez Hills to engage a graduate level intern who provided staff support to the Neighborhood Restoration Subcommittee and Peace Garden Committee as well as linkage to academia to inform the development and implementation of Subcommittee efforts. Leveraging of Resources: The Neighborhood Restoration Subcommittee and Peace Garden Committees’ successful efforts to coordinate and collaborate with various organizations in the target community contributed to the leveraging of resources to support neighborhood restoration projects. Partnerships with local city agencies assisted the Peace Garden Committee in leveraging resources to establish the Peace Garden, including partnership with the City of Long Beach Redevelopment Agency to legally establish the Garden, the City of Long Beach Department of Parks, Recreation, and Marine to provide land and insurance, and the Department of Health and Human Services to pay the water utility bill for the Garden. Partnerships with local businesses such as The Green Plummer and Home Depot provided the labor, expertise, tools and building materials need to create the Garden. Lastly, grants written to community organizations, such as the Neighborhood Partners Program (NPP) and Pacific Gateway Workforce Development Network (Long Beach CalGRIP Youth Beautification Grant), helped the Peace Garden Committee leverage additional funds. The total amount of funds leveraged by the Peace Garden, in business/organization donations, matching funds, volunteer/donated labor, and monetary contributions, is reported at $57,561. Community Participation: • Engaged several city and community organizations in the collaborative efforts described above. • Neighborhood empowerment cleanups have engaged youth and adults in Weed and Seed efforts since the beginning of strategy implementation. ! IE!
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! • Youth Beautification Grants awarded by Pacific Gateway Workforce Investment Network have provided youth with job opportunities over the last two of summers to engage in neighborhood restoration activities. • Nuisance and graffiti reporting information provided to residents during clean-ups encourage them to take ownership over the ascetics of their community and empower them with the tools needed to effectively do so. • Plans to develop a Neighborhood Restoration Block Captain Plan will encourage greater resident participation and leadership in the target community. • The Peace Garden will allow residents of all generations and ethnicities to work side by side and develop greater understanding of one another through collaboration and recognition of a common purpose. It will also serve as a gathering place for future community empowerment events. Recommendations for Sustainability during Year Four: • Carefully review and utilize the publication “Developing a Sustainability Plan” by the Community Capacity Development Office to address each dimension of sustainability (Structural Effort, Community Impact, and Resource Development) and their indicators in planning interventions over the next two years. • Develop strategies to accomplish the stated goals and objectives for neighborhood restoration activities in the Long Beach Weed and Seed Strategic Plan for Year Four. • Encourage greater resident participation and leadership in the target community through a Neighborhood Restoration Block Captain Plan that includes electing block captains to be the point person in their neighborhood that schedules clean-ups and informs residents on how to keep their neighborhood clean. As part of this vision, the block captains would become active members on the Neighborhood Restoration Subcommittee and continue to meet after Long Beach Weed and Seed funding concludes. • Recruit and increase participation by community organizations and residents to plan and support community empowerment events. • Complete the Peace Garden Policy and work out any kinks before presenting it as a model for community gardening in the City of Long Beach. • Acquire a fiscal agent to establish the Peace Garden as a stand-alone entity not dependent on continuous support from Long Beach Weed and Seed. ! IF!
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY YEAR THREE (FY 2009-2010) EVALUATION WEED & SEED COMMUNITY: LONG BEACH BEATS 4 AND 5 ! CONCLUSION AND GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS: The Long Beach Weed and Seed Strategy’s mission, as defined by the U.S. Department of Justice, is to “prevent, control, and reduce violent crime, drug abuse, and gang activity” in the target area. Indeed, statistical data provided by law enforcement shows that narcotic, violent crime, nighttime loitering, and graffiti crime statistics have been reduced in the target area (Police Beats 4 and 5) since strategy implementation in October of 2007. Gang arrests in the City of Long Beach have increased since Strategy implementation; however, target-area specific data is unavailable and thus it is difficult to determine the extent that this is due to targeted law enforcement efforts as part of the Weed and Seed Strategy in Central Long Beach. As the Long Beach Weed and Seed Strategy moves into its fourth year of implementation, the following recommendations are made to ensure the continued success and sustainability of Weed and Seed efforts: • All Long Beach Weed and Seed Subcommittees and the Steering Committee should carefully review and utilize the publication “Developing a Sustainability Plan” by the Community Capacity Development Office to address each dimension of sustainability (Structural Effort, Community Impact, and Resource Development) and their indicators in planning interventions over the next two years. • Align Long Beach Weed and Seed Subcommittee prevention and intervention efforts with the California Endowment Building Healthy Communities Initiative target outcomes to provide the opportunity for sustainable funding and support over the next ten years. • Data found in this evaluation may be used to leverage funding for each Long Beach Weed and Seed partner organization serving the target community. • Partnerships with the California State University and University of California institutions of higher education can provide valuable technical support to the Long Beach Weed and Seed Collaborative, including its subcommittees and individual organizations. It is recommended that undergraduate and graduate students be utilized to strengthen and sustain interventions in the target community. The Weed and Seed Site Director is a useful resource to guide the establishment of student intern support for city and nonprofit agencies in the Collaborative. • Develop strategies for increasing the participation of residents, the business community, and the faith-based community on the Long Beach Weed and Seed Steering and Subcommittees. Residents should be trained to take leadership positions within the Subcommittees to ensure long-term sustainability of Weed and Seed efforts. Collaboration with businesses and the faith- based community should be strengthened to foster an understanding and long-term support of Long Beach Weed and Seed efforts. • The Long Beach Weed and Seed Steering Committee should develop a strategic plan for enhanced integration of MacArthur Park and McBride Park Safe Havens into the Weed and Seed Strategy, including the extension of youth leadership and parent empowerment activities presently available at Martin Luther King Jr. Park to residents who utilize MacArthur and McBride Parks. • Continue to expand community-policing efforts. Educate social service organizations serving the target community about community-policing efforts and the benefits of encouraging participation by the police department in their educational and community empowerment activities. ! I!