Long Beach CalGRIP Grant I Narrative
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Long Beach CalGRIP Grant I Narrative

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Chaired by Lydia A. Hollie, JD/MAED, the Long Beach Youth and Gang Violence Task Force, in collaboration with the Long Beach Weed and Seed Program Steering Committee, spearheaded efforts that led to ...

Chaired by Lydia A. Hollie, JD/MAED, the Long Beach Youth and Gang Violence Task Force, in collaboration with the Long Beach Weed and Seed Program Steering Committee, spearheaded efforts that led to the acquisition of $400,000 for the Long Beach Gang Reduction, Intervention and Prevention Project. This project was designed to address critical unmet community needs necessary to effectively address growing youth andgang violence through a youth-centered, community-wide approach. Project efforts are expected to reduce violent crimes, decrease the number of gang-related offenses, and thereby increase self-esteem and self-worth. In April 2008, the California Governor's Office awarded $400,000 to the city of Long Beach to advance these efforts. In February 2009, the Long Beach Youth and Gang Violence Task Force transitioned into the Long Beach CalGRIP Advisory Council with direct oversight of fund allocations and program outcomes.

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Long Beach CalGRIP Grant I Narrative Long Beach CalGRIP Grant I Narrative Document Transcript

  • LONG BEACH GANG REDUCTION, INTERVENTION AND PREVENTION:A YOUTH-CENTERED COMMUNITY-WIDE PROJECT (LONG BEACH PROJECT)Project Narrative1. PROBLEM STATEMENTThe Long Beach Gang Reduction, Intervention and Prevention Project (Long Beach Project) willaddress critical unmet community needs necessary to effectively address growing youth andgang violence through a youth-centered, community-wide approach enlisting the expertise andresources of numerous City departments, community, educational, and regional partners. TheProject can effectively contribute toward gang prevention, intervention, education, job trainingand skills development, as well as family and community services in the target area. TheProject is designed to provide youth who are identified as already involved in criminal or gangactivity or are at-risk, with positive alternatives to gang participation in a safe environment,including job training and skills development. The Project is also intended to promotecommunity awareness and education via anti-gang messages. Further, the Project will enhancethe coordination of existing efforts and resources related to youth and gang violence preventionand intervention as well as family and community services to maximize the return on theinvestment of limited resources. These Project efforts will reduce the number of violent crimes,reduce the number of gang-related offenses, and increase the number of activities to positivelyimpact community crime and increase self-esteem and self-worth. 1
  • Target AreaWhile gang violence is a citywide problem, this Project specifically targets Police Beats 4 and 5(target area) located entirely within a designated Enterprise Zone. This area was selected dueto high occurrences of crime and persistent and growing problems with gangs, in comparison toother Police Beats in Long Beach.The 2000 Census data derived from Clarita’s Market Place report was used to provide statisticalinformation located within a one-mile radius of the target area. The Long Beach PoliceDepartment provided criminal statistics for the target area.To determine the most appropriate and reasonable target area, the City’s Youth and GangViolence Prevention Task Force conducted research using Long Beach Police Department data.This data included the volume and incidence of violent crime, including murders and gang-related shootings. Based upon an analysis of this data, Police Beats 4 and 5 are impacted bythe highest population of criminal street gangs, which are generally based on neighborhood andethnic affiliations. Some gangs in this area are multi-generational, where grandparent, parent,and siblings are affiliated with some level of gang membership. In 2004 there were 683 juvenilearrests in Police Beats 4 and 5 and the area immediately surrounding these Beats, for a rate of9.5 arrests per 1,000 population; this is more than twice as high as the rate for Long Beach as awhole (4.1 arrests per 1,000). (See Juvenile Arrests Graph in Nature of the Gang Problemsection, page 16). 2
  • Geographic Location and CharacteristicsThe following map illustrates the proposed site that covers Police Beats 4 and 5. It containseleven census tracts from the last decennial census. Its perimeter is delineated by the thickgray line on the map below and its boundaries exist as follows: North Boundary: Hill Street South Boundary: Anaheim Street East Boundary: Cherry Avenue West Boundary: Los Angeles River 3
  • Police Beats 4 and 5 are located just north of downtown Long Beach and slightly southwest ofthe city of Signal Hill. Aside from high levels of crime, residents in these neighborhoods faceother challenges such as poverty and low levels of educational attainment.PopulationThe target area contains more than 50,900 residents in a two square mile area. 89 percent ofresidents are people of color (55 percent Hispanic/Latino, 17 percent Asian, and 17 percentAfrican American/Black). 46 percent are Spanish speakers and 34 percent do not havecitizenship in the United States. Close to half of the population is younger than 18 years old and11 percent are between the ages of 18 and 24.A recent community assessment survey conducted by the City of Long Beach Department ofHealth and Human Services, in conjunction with the City’s Youth and Gang Violence PreventionTask Force, involving 950 respondents in the Project target area revealed that 33 percent of therespondents identify themselves as a stakeholder in the community, 83 percent are renters, and11 percent are owners.Education and SchoolsMore than one third (36 percent) of residents in the target area have less than a ninth gradeeducation. Less than half (41 percent) have a high school diploma and only eight percent havean associate’s degree or higher (bachelor’s, master’s, doctorate, or professional degree).There are two high schools, two middle schools and five elementary schools in thetarget/immediately surrounding area. These schools include: Alvarado Elementary, BurnettElementary, Lincoln Elementary, Roosevelt Elementary, Whittier Elementary, Butler Middle 4
  • School, Washington Middle School, Educational Partnership High School, Long BeachPolytechnic High School, and Polytechnic Academy for Accelerated Learning (PAAL).Dropout RatesLong Beach Unified School District (LBUSD) is the third largest school district in the state ofCalifornia. According to the Youth Education and Labor Market Outcomes in California in 2000report, 21 percent of 16-24 year old youth were noted as high school dropouts in Long Beach ascompared to 16.9 percent statewide (Dr. Paul Harrington, Center for Labor Market Studies,Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts). Newer data from the California Departmentof Education concludes that during the 2005-2006 school year, the Four Year Derived DropoutRate for Long Beach Unified School District is 21.4 percent, as compared to 14.1 percentstatewide (see graph below). Dropout Rate (4 Ye ar De rive d Rate ) Dis trict, County and State Com paris on, 2005-2006 25.0% 20.0% 21.4% LBUS D 17.3% 15.0% 14.1% 10.0% 5.0% 0.0% Long Beach Unified S chool District (LBUS D) Los Angeles County California California Department of Education, http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/ 5
  • Dropout rates climb as students near their senior year of high school. The percentage of 12thgrade students who dropped out of Long Beach Unified School District in 2005-2006 is almostdouble that for the state (14.3 percent verse 7.8 percent) (see graph below). P ercentage of 12th Grade Dropouts District, County and S tate Comparison, 2005-2006 15.0% 14.3% 10.0% 9.6% 7.8% 5.0% 0.0% Long Beach Uni f i ed School Los Angel es County Cal i f or ni a Di str i ct California Department of Education, http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/The number of grade 9-12 dropouts from Polytechnic High School, the high school located inthe target area, is at the second highest point (173 dropouts) that it has risen to in the last tenyears (see graph below). California Department of Education, http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/ 6
  • TruancyOver the last several school years, truancy has decreased citywide, but continues to be high incomparison to other cities. This may be a factor in the high dropout rate in Long Beach.According to the Long Beach Unified School District Truancy Center, the following numbers ofstudents, district-wide have been cited and received tickets between 2003 and 2006: Long Beach Unified School District Students, 2003-2006 School Year Detentions Tickets 2003-2004 1,350 1,258 2004-2005 1,216 1,096 2005-2006 1,047 949 Data courtesy of the Long Beach Police DepartmentOver half of Long Beach Unified School District’s students live in the Polytechnic High Schoolarea (55 percent). A recent review of this highly impacted area evidenced that approximately 95percent of students suspended by the Truancy Counseling Center, suspended to home, ticketedfor daytime loitering, or those given referrals for immediate action and requested expulsions ortransfers to another school, were people of color. During Academic Year 2003-2004, 678students were suspended and six students were expelled from the High School and MiddleSchools located in the target area. In the 2006-2007 school year, 77 percent of PolytechnicHigh School students were considered truant, whereas Long Beach Unified School District’struancy rate was at 58 percent, and California’s rate was much lower at 28 percent (see belowgraph). 7
  • Truancy Rate: Target Area High S chool, District, County and S tate Comparison, 2006-2007 100.00% 77.42% P olytechnic High 58.11% 3,642 S tudents 50.00% LBUS D 52,361 S tudents 31.03% 28.31% Los Angeles California County 0.00% Truancy Rate California Department of Education, http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/IncomeThe median household income for the target area is $21,728. In comparison, the medianhousehold income citywide was $37,270 in 1999. According to Census 2000, more than half(52 percent) of target area residents earn less than $15,000 a year. Only 19 percent of thepopulation is employed and there are 3,236 welfare recipients. This makes up seven percent ofthe total population on welfare or public assistance. Approximately 43 percent of area residentslive at or below the national poverty level compared to 22 percent for all of Long Beach. Ofthose living in poverty, nearly half are under age 17 (over one-third are under the age of 11).Further, the unemployment rate in the target area is six percent compared to four percentcountywide. In households where the gender of the head of household is identified, 44 percentare female-headed households in Beats 4 and 5. This is slightly higher than the citywidepercentage of 41. 8
  • Teen PregnancyThe teen birth rate in Long Beach has risen from 49.3 in 2003 to 51.9 in 2004. These are ratesper 1,000 females age 15-19. While the state rate has declined to 38.1 births for every 1,000females ages 15-19, Long Beach’s rate has continued to rise. This rise exacerbates alreadydifficult quality of life concerns in the target area.Housing Code ViolationsAccording to the Long Beach Department of Community Development, Code EnforcementBureau, there were 2,480 code violations in 2006 in the target area; 1,899 cases had beenresolved at the time of reporting with 278 still active. Of the 12,883 households in the targetarea, over 80 percent (10,373) are renter-occupied. This reality manifests into quality of lifeconcerns as well as neighborhood neglect, gang activity and high dropout rates in this area—allsymptoms of poverty and crime.Adult/Juvenile CrimeIn 2005, adults (18 years of age and over) accounted for 88.8 percent of all persons arrestedand 84.2 percent of violent crime arrests in California. In addition, adults were arrested mostoften for drug abuse violations than any other offense in California.In 2005, persons under 25 years of age comprised 44.3 percent of all those arrested inCalifornia. Juveniles were most often arrested for larceny-theft offenses in California. In LongBeach, the number of arrests for juveniles (under 18 years of age) continues to grow each year.In 2004, 2,266 juveniles were arrested. In 2005, that number increased to 2,437.Arrest statistics have been used as the main barometer of juvenile delinquent activity over thepast decades. Unfortunately many juvenile offenses go unreported and thus do not become a 9
  • part of the national statistical picture. Many minor offenses committed by juveniles areconsidered part of growing up and are handled informally rather than by arrest and adjudication.The most severe sanction that a juvenile court can impose entails the restrictions of a juvenile’sfreedom through placement in a residential facility. Youth who are released from institutionalconfinement are more likely to succeed if they have access to services that can help them thrivein a non-institutional environment. According to the 2003 City of Long Beach Human RelationsCommission Report on Youth and Gang Violence, 85 percent of juvenile offenders citywide areilliterate.Part I CrimesPart I crimes consist of murder, manslaughter, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, residentialand commercial burglary, auto burglary, grand theft, petty theft, bicycle and auto theft, andarson. In the year 2004, there were 1,992 such crimes. In 2005, there were 1,911. FromJanuary to June 2006, there were 950 Part I Crimes in the target area. Evidence of seriousviolent crimes makes up the greater number of Part I crimes in Police Beats 4 and 5 (see belowchart). 10
  • Part I Crimes, 2004-2006 Police Beats 4 and 5 Year 2004 2005 January-June 2006 Homicide 7 13 2 Rape 16 21 12 Robberies 313 229 124 Aggravated Assault 399 387 153 BURGLARIES: Residential 129 120 68 Garage 33 43 29 Commercial 72 75 37 Auto 188 228 123 THEFT: Grand 73 62 30 Petty <50 79 75 46 Petty >50 129 133 54 Bicycle 51 35 17 Auto 476 479 251 Arson 27 11 4 TOTAL 1,992 1,911 950 Data courtesy of the Long Beach Police DepartmentPart II CrimesAvailable data for 2006 provides a snapshot for one month of 332 arrests in the target area.Between 2004 and 2005, adult arrests citywide increased from 17,292 to 19,452. A January2006 snapshot of arrests for a period of one month totaled 3,040. From January to June 2006,there were 1,098 Part II Crimes in the target area (see below chart). Part II Crimes, 2004-2006 Police Beats 4 and 5 Year 2004 2005 January-June 2006 Other Assault 533 497 256 Forgery 96 145 39 Fraud/Embezzlement 51 55 32 Receive Stolen Property 8 11 5 Sex Offenses 54 66 36 Offense vs. Family 8 10 15 Narcotics 302 259 153 11
  • All Other 743 802 562 TOTAL 1,795 1,845 1,098 Data courtesy of the Long Beach Police DepartmentCrimes by Repeat OffendersAccording to the Los Angeles County Probation Department, there are 1,221 juveniles and1,133 adult probationers returning to Long Beach annually. It is estimated that 11,770probationers and parolees will return to Long Beach within the next five years. Nationally, therecidivism rate for this population is 67 percent to commit new crimes according to FBI arrestsstatistics. This means that Long Beach can expect nearly 1,600 new crimes by repeat offendersalone per year.State parole expects to return over 120,000 parolees annually to the streets of California for thenext 5 years. For the six-month period from January to June 2006, there were 31,728 male felonparole violations returned to custody or pending parole revocation, 3,376 more than the Spring2006 projections for the state. There were 2,812 female felon parole violators in the state for thesame period of January to June 2006, 183 more than projected in the Spring 2006 projections.The average time served for parole violations was about 3.4 months.Impact of the Gang ProblemCurrent estimates indicate that 100 active gangs exist throughout Long Beach, 55 gangs havetwelve or more members, and there are about 35 significant gangs in the area. There areapproximately 7,000 members citywide. Police Beats 4 and 5 are home to about 65 gangs.The largest gang in Long Beach is the Insane Crips Gang (ICG). There has been an increase inboth the 18th Street Gang and new cliques of the East Side Longos (ESL). The divide betweenHispanic, Black, Asian and White gangs has fueled racial tensions among the broader 12
  • community. Gangs also contribute to drug use and the drug trade, graffiti, and other criminalactivity in Long Beach. (See Appendix for articles relating to gang injunctions in Long Beach).The aforementioned community survey in the Project target area reveals that many residentslive in fear. Almost half (47 percent) of respondents feel that their neighborhood is unsafe. Inaddition, 14 percent feel that neighborhood crime has increased while one fifth believe that gangactivity has gone up. Almost one third identified gang violence and graffiti as two of the mostpressing issues in their community.Participants in a recent Focus Group meeting of adult residents, held by the City’s Youth andGang Violence Prevention Task Force, expressed that the problem of gang violence and crimein their neighborhoods results in shared feelings of hopelessness and despair—especially fortheir children, destroyed community pride, a disconnection from and distrust of police officers,the breakup of families, residential flight from Long Beach, and a negative impact on localbusinesses.While the rate of violent crimes citywide has dropped in the past several years, murders are onthe rise. There has also been a citywide increase in commercial burglary, residential burglaryand robbery in 2007. Over half of citywide homicides (57 percent) are gang related. Thoughtotal crimes in Beat 5 are down for 2007, crimes in Police Beat 4 have increased 2.5 percent.Beat 5 also has one of the highest murder rates in Long Beach in 2007, year-to-date (see belowgraph). 13
  • 2007 Gang-Related Shootings (Long Beach, CA) YTD 1 /26/07 1 25 25 22 20 20 16 13 14 15 Number of Shootings 9 9 10 8 5 5 4 5 1 1 1 0 Police Beats 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Shoot ings 5 8 20 22 13 25 5 4 1 1 1 9 9 14 16 Long Beach Police Department-Gang Enforcement Section Data YTD 11/26/07The perception of gang violence in these areas is based on real problems, as statistics show: in2005 and 2006, 28 percent of violent crimes and 14 percent of all property crimes in the cityoccurred in Beats 4 and 5. Together, these Beats have the highest numbers in Long Beach forfirearm assaults, including murders and attempted murders. Year-to-date in 2007, there havebeen over 40 shootings in Beats 4 and 5 (see below graph). 14
  • Gang-Re late d Shootings and M urde rs Police Be ats 4 and 5 and Cityw ide , 2002-2007 200 176 175 175 164 162 157 150 150 125 100 55 75 (31% of citywide 55 42 shootings) (31%) (27%) 50 31 27 19 23 22 25 14 0 Shootings (Beats 4 and 5) Total Shootings (Citywide) Total Gang Murders (Citywide) 2002 unavailable 150 31 2003 unavailable 164 27 2004 unavailable 162 19 2005 55 176 14 2006 55 175 23 58.11% 31.03% LBUSD 2007 42 157 22Los Angeles 28.31%52,361 StudentsCalifornia County Long Beach Police Department-Gang Enforcement Section Data YTD 11/26/07Nature of the Gang ProblemAccording to Census 2000, Long Beach is a “young” city with 29 percent (134,019) of residentsunder the age of 18. In Police Beats 4 and 5, 41 percent of the residents are under the age of18. In this target area, juvenile arrests increased to 427 in 2007 (year-to-date) from 239 in 2006.Citations of juveniles also increased to 396 from 234 between those two years (see graphbelow). 15
  • Juvenile Arrests Long Beach, 2004-2007 3,000 2,437 2,266 2,048 2,000 1,863 1,000 683 427 396 365 234 0 239 Arre s ts in Police Cityw ide Arre s ts Cite s Be ats 4 and 5 2004 2,266 683 unk now n 2005 2,437 365 unk now n 2006 2,048 239 234 2007 1,863 427 396 2004 2005 2006 2007 Data courtesy of the Long Beach Police DepartmentIncreasingly, the most common crime that youth commit in Long Beach is assault againstanother youth—most of which occurs on school campuses and surrounding neighborhoods. InLong Beach between 2006-2007, one youth under the age of 18 was murdered, on average,every-other-month (12 youth since the beginning of 2006). In total, 26 people under the age of23 have been victims of homicide since the beginning of 2006.Long Beach has been categorized as “the most diverse city in the nation,” a title supported by2000 Census data. While this is a characteristic that the community values highly, diversity hasalso led to increased tensions between different racial groups. Many violent crimes are racially 16
  • motivated with members of an ethnic gang attacking people of other backgrounds. Tensionscontinue to grow particularly between the African American and Hispanic populations—not onlyin our city, but also in cities that share our border. This is evidenced in the 2006 Hate CrimeReport by the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations that states, “racial conflictbetween African Americans and Latinos remained the most serious and troubling feature ofintergroup relations in Los Angeles County.” According to this report, 69 percent of anti-Blackhate crimes had Latino suspects and 81 percent of anti-Latino hate crimes had Black suspects.While the City of Long Beach seeks to honor cultural and racial diversity, feelings of prejudice,bias, fear and mistrust create endless challenges in our schools and neighborhoods.Further, common themes expressed by Focus Group participants regarding contributing factorsthat lead to gang violence were: the glamorization of violence in the media and among youth,the common existence of racial stereotypes, a perceived lack of education and resources forlow income parents and guardians regarding drug use/abuse, violence and gang activities, thetrend that youth are conditioned to have distrust in police (based off of a negative first-handexperience, or an attitude passed-down between generations in a family), lack of vocationaleducation opportunities, overcrowded classrooms, city budget cuts that limit the offering ofyouth programs, and limited summer jobs or accessible City-sponsored summer programs foryouth.Unmet Community NeedsThe unmet needs impacting the community’s ability to effectively address the gang problem areexemplified in the Focus Group observations noted above. Included among these are: the lackof a formalized, coordinated gang reduction program; resources necessary to de-glamorizegangs and the violence associated with them; education and resources for parents/guardians in 17
  • addition to youth drug and alcohol education and treatment; and vocational/work experienceand job opportunities that create positive alternatives to gang participation in a safeenvironment.A major, focused initiative began in 2006 to better serve the community in Police Beats 4 and 5.The City formed a grant proposal committee in order to understand the community’s concernsfor their most relevant and pressing issues, as well as to have the community assist withimplementation strategies fitting to their community. As a result, hundreds of surveys weredispersed to ensure responses reflective of the diversity in the population of Beats 4 and 5. Agreat sample size of the larger population strongly returned over 950 surveys consisting ofresponses from: schools, childcare facilities, youth service agencies such as parks andrecreation, churches, elderly care agencies and private residents. Further, the establishedcommittee reflected the diversity of the community, consisting of: residents, faith-basedcommunity, and government representatives at the local, state and federal level, along withprivate and non-profit representatives. The purpose of the committee was to convene a groupof people involved and concerned with the issues in the community. These committeemembers met for four months to assess the needs of their community and to create a blueprintfor the successful implementation of programming befitting their specific community. Many ofthe findings are reflected in this proposal.Social ServicesAlthough some resources do exist in the target area, they do not adequately address thecommunity’s problems. The population levels, culture differences, geographical facts regardinghousing stock and age, single family homes and apartments, public housing andhomeownership, transient rate and unfunded projects are main factors related to the crime, 18
  • social factors and needs of the area. The following service gaps were expressed as the top sixresource needs by residents of the target area via a community assessment survey: • After-school programs (28 percent) • Adult Employment (24 percent) • Affordable Health Care (23 percent) • Youth Employment/ Sports and Recreation Programs/Teen Center (20 percent) • Reading Programs for Youth (13 percent) • Parent Resource Center (13 percent)The recent 2007 award of the federal Weed and Seed Grant Initiative to the City of Long Beachprovides funding over five years for initial prevention and intervention efforts in Police Beats 4and 5. However, this program is unable to address the breadth and depth of the problem on itsown. Further, budget cuts and other resource limitations have impacted the City’s ability tosupport the coordination and enhancement of existing youth and gang violence prevention andintervention efforts.With so many young people living in Long Beach, there is an urgent and critical need to employmore resources in the target area to further develop a strong support structure, including a staffdedicated to focusing solely on networking, promoting and delivering prevention initiatives inLong Beach that will positively impact the community. In addition, resources are needed toexpand comprehensive and multifaceted intervention and suppression efforts on a regionalbasis, resulting in decreasing youth violence, crime, and gang-related deaths. 19
  • 2. PLAN AND IMPLEMENTATIONProject Plan and FocusThe Long Beach Project will focus on the key areas of gang prevention, intervention, education,job training and skills development. It will also include elements of family and communityservices. Specifically, the Long Beach Project will focus on providing positive alternatives togang participation, community awareness and education, and coordination of existing effortsand resources.Addressing the ProblemMany roots of the gang problem expressed earlier in this document will be addressed in thetarget area by the Long Beach Project. These consist of: a large youth population with un-addressed needs (including alarming rates of youth violence), a need for vocationalopportunities, citywide budget cuts in youth programming, media glamorization of violence,strained police/community relations, perceived lack of resources for low-income families, andintergroup community tensions.A) Positive Alternatives to Gang ParticipationGiven that close to one-third of Long Beach’s population is under the age of 18 and that almosthalf of the residents in Police Beats 4 and 5 are also under age 18, the educational, conflictresolution, leisure-time, employment, and other needs of youth are of serious concern tocommunity members and leaders. The Long Beach Project will: 20
  • 1. Enhance capabilities at City youth Safe Haven sites located at the California Recreation Center and the Central Facilities Center at Martin Luther King Park, both in Police Beats 4 and 5, in order to provide expanded services for the youth accessing the existing Weed and Seed programs. This will include: o Hiring a part-time Department of Health and Human Services Community Health Worker to support the department’s Weed and Seed Grant Coordinator. o Coaching community agencies and City departments to actively refer youth and their families to City youth Safe Havens. (For example, the Community Development Department will refer their family contacts from Community Police Centers to Safe Havens. Long Beach Public Library staff will do the same with families they come into contact with from the target area). o Purchasing additional computers, software, and internet connectivity for Safe Havens. o Funding staffing for computer classes and staffing for tutorial and after school activities conducted in Safe Havens. o Purchasing school supplies, books and activities to strengthen learning (reading, math, memory, etc.), enhance drug prevention, and deliver youth and gang violence prevention activities. o Collaborating with the Long Beach Public Library to pursue the establishment of an additional Safe Haven at the Mark Twain Library. [Focus: Prevention]2. Enroll target area youth in the City’s Workforce Investment Network (Network) and Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD) programs that provide access to a menu of programs and services designed to aid in the acquisition of educational and 21
  • training support in preparation for success in the workforce of the 21st Century.These programs and services will include workforce preparation, work experience, jobtraining, and exposure to postsecondary education. o Workforce Preparation - With support from the Network’s Youth Opportunity Center, Career Transition Center, one-stop partner agencies and Workforce Investment Act (WIA) subcontracted organizations, youth may engage in varied activities designed to support completion of secondary education, obtain a GED, prepare for advance training/postsecondary education, and entry into the labor force. Services provided to younger (ages 14-18) and older (ages 19+) youth will be based upon their individual circumstances and needs and may include access to any of the following: • Resource Centers, which provide access to internet connected computers, telephone and fax machines, photocopiers, and resource postings; • Academic counseling, tutoring, homework assistance, and training in test taking and note taking skills; • Work-Readiness/Soft Skills Training, including interviewing techniques, resume development, application completion, work-place ethics and behavior, financial literacy, communication skills, and team building; • Labor market information, including industry and occupational demand, working conditions, and wage expectations; • Occupational skills training, including training opportunities in high-wage, high-growth industries (i.e., Health Care, Construction, Energy and Utilities, and Transportation/Logistics); • Hire-A-Youth Program, which includes unpaid internships, paid work experience, placement in unsubsidized employment and job coaching; and 22
  • opportunities to focus on career opportunities of interest to participating youth, including city-wide work experience programs; • Volunteer opportunities to earn Service Learning credit and gain further exposure to potential career opportunities; • Leadership Development, including opportunities to development leadership skills and engage in the community by participating in youth-led projects • Mentoring relationships with positive, successful role models; • Supportive services and incentives as needed to ensure successful completion of planned activities • Assistance completing college applications and researching scholarship and financial aid opportunities. In addition, older youth (18+) enrolled in the project will receive priority enrollment into WIA subcontractor’s programs for even more intensive services. Further, enrollment into a program tailored for juvenile offenders, camp returnees, consistent truants, and/or credit-deficient disciplinary transfer students will provide 12 youth each year with GED preparation, coupled with workforce development and job or internship placement. Network staff will work with the Long Beach Unified School District Truancy Office, the District School for Adults, and Probation Officers to recruit and monitor participants. The program will span 40 hours per week over the course of the three-year Long Beach Project.o Work Experience - Under the direction of the Workforce Investment Network, 18-24 year old youth who reside in the target area will participate in paid work experience 23
  • and structured workforce development through a Community Beautification/ Neighborhood Enhancement Project component a total of 450 hours. Each 15-week cycle will consist of 300 hours of paid work experience and 150 hours of workforce development activities (30 hours per week combined). The Neighborhood Enhancement Project will be available three times per year to 13 youth per cycle. o Under the supervision of the Employment Specialist, youth will be engaged in clean-up efforts and varied beautification projects in key corridors within Police Beats 4 and 5 a total of 20 hours per week. Activities will include removal of weeds, sweeping, removal of small debris, and limited tree trimming. Through coordination with the City’s Community Development Block Grant-funded Neighborhood Resource center, youth will also be engaged in various neighborhood beautification projects in connection with neighborhood associations throughout the target area. Associations will propose projects for their neighborhoods, which can complement with the overall project objectives. Each youth will be paid $8.00 per hour for each hour worked. o During each 15-week cycle, youth will participate in structured workforce development and preparation activities 10 hours per week. Activities will include life skills, work-readiness/soft skills training, leadership development, and educational support activities.o Job Training - Long Beach Unified School District’s Regional Occupation Program (ROP) will provide priority enrollment for students to participate in job training classes offered to both 11th and 12th grade and adult students who reside in or attend school in the target area. Training opportunities will focus on high-wage, high-growth 24
  • industry sectors involved with Business and Marketing, Health and Medical, Consumer and Human Services, and Industry and Technology. o Training will be provided free to high school students, and target area adult fees will be waived. Course completion will result in increased eligibility for employment or preparation for advanced training. o Classes include: Business Career Internship, Clerical Office Occupations, Computer Business Applications, Small Business Management, Hospital Health Services, Medical occupations, Medical Billing, Medical Clerical, Medical Core, Medical Terminology, Careers with Children, Culinary Arts, Law Enforcement, Animal Care, Auto Collision, Construction, Graphic Design, and Landscape Railroad Technology. o The school district will also offer training necessary to properly prepare students for internships and employment, sponsor career fairs and job fairs for target area youth to attend, and will provide informational workshops and recruitment services to students and community members in the target area.o Exposure to Postsecondary Education - The School District will coordinate a program in conjunction with California State University Long Beach (CSULB) to recruit traditionally underrepresented students to visit CSULB two Saturdays per month, with a different cohort of students each month. The goal is to have students become familiar with the college atmosphere, and understand the various support programs available to students. Students will be recruited primarily from Polytechnic High School, located in the target area, and other High Schools serving students from the target area. [Focus: Job Training and Skills Development] 25
  • 3. Encourage young adults to participate in programs like the City’s Midnight Basketball Program. This free program is a winter and spring basketball league and mentoring program for men and women ages 17-25. Programs run twice a week from 9:00 pm - 12:00 midnight, and participant workshops are offered in job training, volunteering, and counseling areas. To many, this program serves as an intervention approach for ex-offenders, truants and other at-risk young adults. [Focus: Intervention]4. Support the Long Beach City College Women and Men’s Resource Center’s efforts to develop a publicity campaign to actively recruit high school youth to participate in its annual “It’s My Future” Youth Anti-Violence Conference.” Students who attend high school in the target area (Polytechnic High) and those who live in Police Beats 4 and 5 will be targeted to participate in this educational, youth-led conference. Long Beach Project funds will also be used to support programmatic elements of the anti-violence conference. [Focus: Education]5. Assist with coordinating truant youth participation in education, job development and intervention as well as violence prevention programs. The Long Beach Police Department Intervention/Prevention Officer will specifically focus on this effort. [Focus: Intervention]6. Provide conflict resolution workshops in the target area and surrounding community. Workshops will be catered toward youth and/or adult audience needs and may be offered in partnership with a community based organization. [Focus: Education] 26
  • B) Community Awareness and EducationThe Long Beach Project will express anti-gang messages and support anti-gang efforts in orderto promote community awareness and education. The Project will: 1. Develop and launch a dynamic, multimedia, citywide Public Educational Awareness Campaign to de-glorify and de-glamorize youth and gang violence. A team of community agencies, educational entities, City departments, and local television stations, led by the Long Beach Project Coordinator, will share resources (including middle, high school and college student participation) to create this campaign intended for child, youth and adult audiences. [Focus: Prevention and Education] 2. Expand the delivery of the Department of Health and Human Services’ Parents/Grandparents of Youth support groups/educational meetings. This project will provide adults who are raising youth an opportunity to have their specific concerns and needs addressed by professional resources. The part-time Community Health Worker will be responsible for this element. [Focus: Family and Community Services] 3. Enhance the Long Beach Police Department Intervention/Prevention Program. o An Intervention/Prevention Officer will be hired to work on a time-and-a-half schedule to assist with the coordination of the Police Department’s Intervention/Prevention Program. 27
  • o Partnerships between the targeted community and Police Department will be enhanced via police/youth dialogues. o Target area residents will be referred to existing Police Department/Community Relations monthly education forums, and encouraged to participate in the Police Department Citizens’ Academy. o The Police Department will monitor crime statistics for Police Beats 4 and 5 in order to provide regular reports to the Long Beach Project Coordinator, Coordinating and Advisory Council, and the City’s Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Task Force. [Focus: Prevention and Intervention]C) Coordination of Efforts and ResourcesThe Long Beach Project will enhance the coordination of existing efforts and resources relatedto youth and gang violence prevention and intervention, as well as family and communityservices. The Project will:1. Hire a Violence Prevention Coordinator to oversee the Long Beach Project. The Coordinator position will be housed in the Office of the City Manager’s Human Dignity Program and will be categorized as a contract employee. This keystone position will: • Provide staff services and coordinate the efforts for the Long Beach Project Coordinating and Advisory Council and its subcommittees; • Coordinate efforts with other City departments; • Serve as liaison between public and private agencies as well as build regional coalitions with County and city agencies for a more regional approach to the problem; 28
  • • Recruit volunteers or interns to provide support for projects (College interns from the target area will serve to support Project communications, marketing needs and assist in Project administration); and• Maintain grant compliance and reporting.The Coordinator will also manage prevention, education and response efforts by fulfilling thefollowing responsibilities: Prevention o Serve as the lead staff person for the City’s Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Task Force, which includes members, a City-staffed Resource Team, and an Executive Committee. o Develop, implement and sustain a Violence Prevention Plan for the City. o Serve as a liaison to the City’s Human Relations Commission on the City’s Violence Prevention Plan. o Support the delivery of prevention programs focused specifically in Police Beats 4 and 5. This includes collaboration with community-based organization efforts, school-based prevention programs, and the Weed and Seed Coordinator’s projects. o Explore long-term sustainability of violence prevention efforts by pursuing opportunities for additional funding. o Develop a calendar of safe, supervised and fun activities to be distributed to families in the target area, with a focus on after-school and weekend options for youth (including evenings and holidays). o Reconvene the City’s Youth Services Network (formerly coordinated by the Department of Parks, Recreation and Marine). 29
  • o Assist with the update of youth and community resource lists on City web pages, including www.savinglives.longbeach.gov. [Focus: Prevention]Educationo Conduct a citywide public educational awareness campaign that expresses an anti- gang violence message. This campaign will communicate anti-gang messages which de-glorify and de-glamorize violence through the promotion of positive character and community and social values (i.e., integrity, responsibility, accountability and respect). The Coordinator will work with community-based organizations that serve groups most affected by violence to develop messages that are culturally and linguistically sensitive to the diverse population in the city (i.e., multi-lingual brochures, billboards, bus stop ads, multi-ethnic events, web site, TV ads, etc.).o Promote the citywide Season for Nonviolence campaign (January 30-April 4, annually) with the Human Dignity Officer.o Collaborate with existing agencies to connect ex-offenders with educational, mental health and/or life skills programs and services. [Focus: Education]Responseo Provide assistance to families who seek resources to prevent gang involvement with their children.o Address community concerns regarding gang violence via community forums. 30
  • o Conduct outreach to community members following youth violence and gang violence incidents to de-escalate community tension. o Develop, train and deploy the City’s first Youth and Gang Violence Crisis Response Team (Crisis Response Team), discussed in further detail below. o Seek additional funding sources to expand the Crisis Response Team to offer services to mediate racialized, inter-cultural or intra-cultural gang violence. An enhanced team would serve as intercessors to resolve confrontations between groups and to prevent confrontations from escalating or becoming destructive. (This concept is based on an initial recommendation by the City’s Human Relations Commission in its 2003 Report on Youth and Gang Violence to City Council). [Focus: Family and Community Services]2. Provide opportunities for the Long Beach Police Department to engage youth and families in programs that prevent crime. The Police Department will connect youth and families to resources, including: the Police Athletic League, job skills programs, education programs, parent education trainings, family counseling and recreational activities. The Police Department will also take part in drug and gang prevention and education programs at Safe Havens, churches, schools and other organizations. These efforts will be supported by the Intervention/Prevention Officer. [Focus: Prevention]3. Network community resources through the implementation of varied approaches in order to maximize outreach to diverse communities. 31
  • o The Long Beach Public Library will determine best practices to connect community resource information on www.lbpl.org with the City’s Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Task Force Web Site and the Youth Services Network web site. o A Youth Services Guide Directory will be created by a collaborative team including the City of Long Beach Department of Parks and Recreation, the Long Beach Public Library, the Community Development Department and the Long Beach Project Coordinator. o The City’s Youth Services Network web site will be maintained with member submissions by the Department of Parks and Recreation. This online Youth Services database provides access to a list of organizations that serve youth and children. The data was collected and organized jointly by the Department of Parks and Recreation and the Long Beach Unified School District, Office of Alternative Education and Student Support Services. o Coordination of the City’s Youth Services Network will transition from the Department of Parks and Recreation to the Long Beach Project Coordinator. Network meetings will be held quarterly. [Focus: Prevention]4. Respond to incidents of youth and gang violence through the implementation of the City’s Youth and Gang Violence Crisis Response Team (Crisis Response Team). The Long Beach Project Coordinator will spearhead the creation of this specialized team. The Crisis Response Team will respond specifically to youth violence and gang violence in order to provide assistance, intervention and prevention to victims, their families, and witnesses of such violent acts. This program will bring to life a needed citywide response to gang violence and will be instrumental in de-escalating community tension, bringing about mediation opportunities, and encouraging dialogue. The Crisis Response Team will be 32
  • trained in a multi-day skill development program and will meet monthly to further develop their victim response skills. This initiative will include the establishment of a City Youth and Gang Violence Crisis Response Procedure in partnership with the Long Beach Police Department. The Crisis Response Team will be part of the Human Dignity Program Community Assistance Team, and will be modeled after the Los Angeles Crisis Response Team. [Focus: Intervention, Prevention, and Family and Community Services]5. De-escalate tensions between different racial groups in Long Beach and address issues of stereotyping and bias via efforts by the Violence Prevention Coordinator in collaboration with the Human Dignity Officer. Specialized neighborhood dialogue programs may be delivered by the Long Beach Project as a result of Youth and Gang Violence Crisis Response Team activations to address related concerns in the target community. [Focus: Prevention]6. Build valuable alliances in the community and region. o The Long Beach Project Coordinator will communicate regularly with the Long Beach City College Women and Men’s Resource Center about programs and services geared toward ex-offender reentry. o The Long Beach Project Coordinator will attend monthly Los Angeles County Interagency Gang Task Force meetings with the Long Beach Police Department. Together, they will pursue additional ways to enhance a lasting and continued relationship with state and local law enforcement, probation, parole, and other potential regional partners. 33
  • o The Long Beach Project Coordinator and Police Department will also participate in discussions with the Los Angeles Superior Court regarding improving the warrant system, with the possibility of securing funding for a regional warrant officer. As a result, youth resource referral efforts will be coordinated with the Superior Court. o Long Beach Unified School District will secure office space at a school in the target area for the Long Beach Project Coordinator to utilize on a weekly or monthly basis. o School District staff will keep the Long Beach Project Coordinator appraised of school programs for at-risk youth (i.e., Fostering Opportunities for Creating Unified Success– FOCUS, Guidance Opportunity Classes, Specialized Educational and Learning Environment for Collaborative Transitions–SELECT, Project TEAM–Teaching and Encouraging Academic Minds, Extended Day Interventions for Middle School English Learners, CAHSEE Interventions, Safe and Civil Schools Initiative, Second Step, Too Good for Drugs and Violence, Truancy Counseling Center–TCC, District-wide Crisis Response Team, Student Success Intervention Teams, the School Based Mental Health Collaborative, and parent education classes). o Designated School District staff will connect the Long Beach Project with the District’s Truancy Center and the District’s School for Adults GED Program. [Focus: Prevention]7. Enhance the Department of Health and Human Services’ offering of substance abuse services. The Department’s Community Health Worker will establish additional drug/alcohol abuse prevention activities for youth. (S)he will develop a substance abuse treatment referral guide for community distribution. In addition, (s)he will assist with the development and distribution of treatment and aftercare services for substance addicts. [Focus: Family and Community Services] 34
  • Addressing Unmet NeedsThe Long Beach Project will establish a needed, formalized and coordinated anti-gang programin the City of Long Beach in order to better address the community’s problems. It will reign in anetwork of wrap-around resources and services necessary to de-glamorize youth and gangviolence, educate families about youth drug and alcohol abuse and treatment, providevocational/ work experience and job opportunities, create positive youth alternatives to gangparticipation in a safe environment, and to respond to additional community needs resultingfrom gang violence. Service areas of concern to target area residents will be addressedthrough the support and promotion of after-school academic and recreation programs, tutoring,job training and employment opportunities, and health care resources.The Long Beach Project will enhance the City’s established Weed and Seed Grant efforts byfurther enhancing local resources through identifying and organizing a partnership betweenthem and regional resources. The Project will help to double the resources and allow programsto reach a larger target than they could individually. Local resources can be better distributed,enhanced and coordinated through collaboration of services by community agencies and theiragreement not to duplicate services in the target area. The improved distribution can beaccomplished by establishing a specific schedule to make activities and services available tothe community by: the utilization of the Weed and Seed Grant youth Safe Havens for servicelocations; establishment of a resource buddy system; notification of law enforcement when acrime is witnessed; formation of neighborhood watch groups; and contact with a Citydepartment when a problem is identified.Youth Safe Havens 35
  • Youth will have expanded opportunity to take advantage of Weed and Seed Grant-establishedyouth Safe Havens for after school activities such as tutoring, mentoring, sports activities, andcraft classes. Two Safe Havens have recently been identified to offer services 3-5 days a weekto youth. Safe Havens have been identified as a community meeting location to plancommunity events to improve the quality of life for the target area. The Long Beach Project willdirect youth and resources to the Safe Havens. 36
  • Project Objectives and Expected SuccessThe Long Beach Project will positively impact the focus areas of gang prevention, intervention,education, job training and skills development, as well as family and community services in thetarget area. Following is a description of objectives that address each focus, along withidentified measurements of success. The Project will:1. Provide youth who are identified as already involved in criminal or gang activity or are at-risk, with positive alternatives to gang participation in a safe environment, including job training and skills development. a. Prevention – A focus on prevention will be evidenced by the enhancement of capabilities at City youth Safe Haven sites located in Police Beats 4 and 5, in order to provide expanded services for the youth accessing the existing Weed and Seed programs. Success indicators will include:  Securing a part-time Community Health Worker in the Department of Health and Human Services.  Referral of 156 youth and their families to City youth Safe Havens by community agencies and City departments (one youth per week).  Three additional computers, including software, and three years of internet connectivity at Safe Havens.  100 hours of computer classes, tutoring, and after school activities provided on an annual basis at Safe Havens.  School supplies, books and activities for 12 youth participating in Safe Haven programs. 37
  •  Additional Safe Haven established at the Mark Twain Library.b. Job Training and Skills Development – A focus on job training and skills development will be evidenced by the enrollment of target area youth in the City’s Workforce Investment Network and Long Beach Unified School District programs that provide access to a menu of programs and services designed to aid in the acquisition of educational and training support in preparation for success in the workforce of the 21st Century. These programs and services include workforce preparation, work experience, job training, and exposure to postsecondary education. Anticipated success indicators include: o 79 percent of youth participants 14-18 years of age will demonstrate an increase in their basic literacy skills and 67 percent will achieve a high school diploma (or equivalent), as a result of participation in workforce preparation activities. o 69 percent of youth participants 19 years of age and older will attain employment and 39 percent will attain both employment and a credential (high school diploma, GED or certification). o 36 juvenile offenders, camp returnees, consistent truants, and/or credit- deficient disciplinary transfer students per year will receive their GED and be placed in a job or internship.  117 youth participants per year will complete a paid work experience and structured workforce development program through the Community Beautification/ Neighborhood Enhancement Project.  30 percent of youth participants who successfully complete the workforce component will attain employment and an additional 39 percent will attain a 38
  • credential (high school diploma, GED or certification) and/or enter advanced training or postsecondary education.  225 youth and adults per semester will be enrolled in job training over the course of the three-year project. Success will be measured by the number of youth and adults completing job training and participating in employment placement activities and/or entering advanced training.  300 students from Polytechnic High School, or students who live in the surrounding neighborhoods (300 over three years) will participate in the Exposure to Postsecondary Education program, cosponsored by the Long Beach Unified School District and California State University, Long Beach. The number of participants who enroll in college will also determine program success. Students will be tracked through Cal-PASS (California Partnership for Achieving Student Success). Additional measures will include increases in GPA, attendance, standardized test scores (including the California Standards Test) and the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE), and decreases in discipline. Project Team Counselors of Long Beach Unified School District will perform this tracking.c. Intervention – A focus on intervention will be evidenced by the coordination of truant youth participation in education, job development and intervention as well as violence prevention programs. Success indicators will include the referral of 36 young adults under the age of 25 to participate in the City’s Midnight Basketball Program or other intervention programs. This will, in turn, lower the recidivism rate among participants. 39
  • d. Education – A focus on education will be evidenced by the promotion and delivery of the Long Beach City College Women and Men’s Resource Center’s annual “It’s My Future” Youth Anti-Violence Conference. Success indicators will include annual conference participation of 75 students from the target area who will develop an understanding of a wide-range of alternatives that resolve conflict without violence. At least half of the youth participants from the target area will develop conference planning, leadership and facilitation skills. This will increase their influence among peers regarding violence prevention messages. Increased conference attendance will result each year. Further, five college students will interface with youth participants each year (15 college students over the three-year period), who will provide mentoring relationships to the youth. In addition, 12 conflict resolution workshops will be provided for 180 youth and adult participants in the target area and surrounding community over the three-year period and will express positive attitudinal and behavioral change in regards to issues of conflict.2. Promote community awareness and education via anti-gang messages. a. Prevention and Intervention – A dual focus on prevention and intervention will be evidenced by the enhancement of the Long Beach Police Department Intervention/Prevention Program. Success indicators will include: o Securing one Intervention/Prevention Officer who will work 10 hours per week (520 hours annually, and 1,560 hours over the three-year period). 40
  • o Attitudinal shift and relationship-building between the targeted community and Police Department as a result of participation in at least one annual police/youth dialogue (three over the three-year period). o The referral of 36 residents per year to existing Police Department/Community Relations education forums and the Police Department Citizens’ Academy. b. Education – A focus on education will be evidenced by the launch of a Public Educational Awareness Campaign to de-glorify and de-glamorize youth and gang violence. Success indicators will include multimedia outreach to child, youth and adult audiences which will result in 104 new visits to the Long Beach Project web site (one each week for two years) and 52 calls for service (one every two weeks for two years). c. Family and Community Services – A focus on family and community services will be evidenced by the expansion of the delivery of the Department of Health and Human Services’ Parents/Grandparents of Youth support groups/educational meetings. Success indicators will include the delivery of four support groups/education meetings by the Community Health Worker.3. Enhance the coordination of existing efforts and resources related to youth and gang violence prevention and intervention as well as family and community services to maximize the return on the investment of limited resources. a. Prevention – A focus on prevention will be evidenced via multiple avenues. 41
  • First, by securing one Violence Prevention Coordinator in the Office of the CityManager. Success indicators will include the following accomplishments: o Supervision of at least two volunteers or interns per year (six over the three- year period). o Delivery of eight Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Task Force meetings and four Community Education Forums per year (24 and 12, respectively, over the three-year period). o Coordination of monthly Resource Team meetings (36 over the three-year period). o Coordination of quarterly Executive Committee meetings (12 over the three- year period). o The adoption of a citywide Violence Prevention Plan by the City Council, with the support of the Long Beach Unified School District, and other community entities. o Monthly presentations to the City’s Human Relations Commission on the City’s Violence Prevention Plan (36 over the three-year period). o Secure additional violence prevention funding to sustain these efforts on a long-term basis in Long Beach. o The development and distribution of a calendar of safe youth activities to 1,000 target area youth and their families, at least on an annual basis. o Coordinate four annual Youth Services Network meetings (12 over the three- year period). o Coordinate monthly updates of youth and community resource lists on City web pages (including www.savinglives.longbeach.gov). 42
  • The prevention focus will also be indicated as the Long Beach Police Departmentengages youth and families in programs that prevent crime. Success indicatorswill include: o Connecting 36 youth and families to departmental and/or other agency prevention programs. o The Police Department will take part in 36 drug and gang prevention and education programs at Safe Havens, churches, schools and other organizations.A focus on prevention will further be revealed with the implementation of variedapproaches to network community resources. Success will be evidenced by:o Merging or cross-referencing at least on a quarterly basis, community resource information on the Long Beach Public Library web site (www.lbpl.org) with the City’s Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Task Force Web Site (www.savinglives.longbeach.gov) and the Youth Services Network web site (www.longbeachyouth.org).o The creation and distribution of a Youth Services Guide Directory to 2,000 target area youth and families.o Weekly maintenance of the City’s Youth Services Network web site.o Quarterly meetings of the City’s Youth Services Network will be held by the Long Beach Project Coordinator.Further, prevention will be the focus as the Long Beach Project aims to de-escalate racial tensions, stereotypes and bias. Success will be evidenced in the 43
  • delivery of an annual, specialized neighborhood dialogue program, resulting from outreach by the Youth and Gang Violence Crisis Response Team. In the vein of prevention, the Long Beach Project will build valuable alliances in the community and region. Success will be evidenced by: o The coordination of at least one ex-offender reentry program per year alongside Long Beach City College and/or the Countywide Criminal Justice Coordinating Committee. o The Long Beach Project staff attendance at monthly Los Angeles County Interagency Gang Task Force meetings. o A final determination with the Los Angeles Superior Court about securing funding for a regional warrant officer and improvement of the warrant system. o Coordinating 18 youth resource referrals from the Superior Court (one every- other-month). o Weekly or monthly utilization of office space at a Long Beach Unified School District school in the target area. o Bi-annual updates on School District programs for at-risk youth, including face- to-face meetings with key staff at the District’s Truancy Center and the School for Adults GED Program.b. Education – A focus on education will be evidenced by the launch of citywide multimedia education and awareness campaigns to express anti-gang violence messages. Success indicators will include: o The creation and distribution of education and awareness campaign materials in English, Spanish and Khmer languages to 2,250 target area residents. 44
  • o Involvement in promotion of the citywide Season for Nonviolence campaign, including garnering annual Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Task Force endorsement and monthly City promotional messages during the January-April timeframe.c. Family and Community Services – A focus on family and community services will be evidenced by efforts in response to youth and gang violence. Success indicators will include: o Responding to 72 calls for service from families who seek resources to prevent gang involvement with their children (one every-other-week). o Hosting community forums on an as-needed basis to address individualized community concerns regarding gang violence (up to four per year). o Recruit and train 60 volunteers to make up the Youth and Gang Violence Crisis Response Team (60 per year). o Activate the Crisis Response Team on 36 calls for service in response to youth violence and gang violence. o Establishment of a City response procedure/protocol in partnership with the Long Beach Police Department. Lastly, a focus on family and community services will be evidenced by enhancing the Department of Health and Human Services offering of substance abuse services. Success indicators will include: o The establishment of additional drug/alcohol abuse prevention activities for 12 unduplicated youth. 45
  • o The development of a substance abuse treatment referral guide for community distribution to 1,500 people. o The development and distribution of treatment and aftercare services for substance addiction services affecting up to 36 target area residents.Implementation and Lead AgencyThe City of Long Beach Office of the City Manager will have lead responsibility for implementingthe Long Beach Project. The Human Dignity Officer will act as the Project Director and theproposed Violence Prevention Coordinator will serve as the Project Coordinator. Both positionsare located in the Office of the City Manager. The Human Dignity Officer will supervise theViolence Prevention Coordinator. Currently, the Human Dignity Officer heads youth and gangviolence prevention initiatives in the City by dedicating 50 percent of the position’s time. Thesejob responsibilities will shift to the Violence Prevention Coordinator to focus 100 percent ofhis/her time on, once hired. This will allow maximum efforts in this arena.The Office of the City Manager has the organizational ability to carry out the proposed LongBeach Project plan, as the Human Dignity Program has already laid its foundation. The HumanDignity Program was established in 2000 to support the City’s Human Dignity Policy that states:“everyone should be treated with courtesy and respect, regardless of their racial background,their nation of origin, the religion they practice, their sexual orientation, gender, or disabilitystatus. It is the right of all residents to pursue their daily lives with the knowledge that they willnot be threatened with violence or physical harm.” This policy and the Human Dignity Programevidence the City’s commitment to building safe, healthy, productive communities. The HumanDignity Program has and continues to provide youth and gang violence prevention, diversityeducation, hate crime response, and community harmony promotion programming and services 46
  • to the community. The City’s Community Assistance Team, a team of trained volunteers whorespond to hate crimes/bias incidents and mediate intergroup conflict, is led by the HumanDignity Program.A City Violence Prevention ConnectionSince 2004, the Human Dignity Officer has served as the main staff support for the City’s Youthand Gang Violence Prevention Task Force and other prevention initiatives. The Task Forcewas created to focus on issues affecting Police Beats 4, 5 and 7. Its Vision is to help build: “acommunity where youth are highly valued, well educated, skilled for the 21st century workplace,healthy, law abiding, and contributing members of society who respect the rights of others andthemselves.” Unique to this endeavor is the cross-departmental support that has been offeredthroughout Long Beach since the Task Force’s inception. This includes staff involvement fromthe Department of Health and Human Services, Long Beach Police Department, CommunityDevelopment Department, the Department of Technology Services, Long Beach Public Library,and the Department of Parks, Recreation and Marine.The Violence Prevention Coordinator (Project Coordinator)The Violence Prevention Coordinator will work closely with the involved City departments’ keystaff, including the proposed Long Beach Police Department Intervention/Prevention Officer, theproposed Department of Health and Human Services Community Health Worker as well as theestablished Weed and Seed Grant Coordinator, and the Community Development Department’sWorkforce Investment Network staff in order to implement elements of the Long Beach Project.This Coordinator will have direct involvement in activities, coordinate community partnershipentities, respond to the needs and recommendations of the Long Beach Project Coordinatingand Advisory Council, as well as serve as its conduit between the various entities to recommendresources and provide communication to accomplish tasks. 47
  • 48
  • The Violence Prevention Coordinator will be responsible for coordinating the following entities: • Youth Services Network (quarterly meetings) • Youth and Gang Violence Crisis Response Team (multi-day skill development training and monthly meetings) • Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Task Force (monthly meetings) • Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Task Force City-staffed Resource Team (monthly meetings) • Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Task Force Executive Committee/Long Beach Project Coordinating and Advisory Council (quarterly meetings)The Violence Prevention Coordinator will be a key player in daily operations, and as such, willcommit 100 percent of his/her time to oversee the implementation of the Long Beach Projectstrategy on a day-to-day basis.Previous ExperienceThe City of Long Beach has lengthy experience in implementing grants. The City is currentlyimplementing the Department of Justice Weed and Seed Grant over a five-year period, throughthe Department of Health and Human Services. Further, the Long Beach Police Departmentseeks out and implements grants on a regular basis. These two departments’ undertakings areof note, as they are each collaborating with staff from the Office of the City Manager to proposeand implement the Long Beach Project. 49
  • Coordination and CollaborationThe current partnership between the City of Long Beach and residents residing in Police Beats4 and 5 via the Long Beach Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Task Force to address qualityof life issues in and around the existing site led to the interest in the Governor’s Office ofEmergency Services Gang Reduction, Intervention and Prevention Program for Cities (CalGRIP). Once appraised of the Cal GRIP Grant opportunity, City departments began meeting tostrategize the Long Beach Project, including the Office of the City Manager, the Long BeachPolice Department, the Department of Health and Human Services, the City’s WorkforceInvestment Network, the Community Development Department, the Department of Parks,Recreation and Marine, the Long Beach Public Library, and Long Beach Television Channel 8.Early on in the development strategy, other partners, such as Long Beach Unified SchoolDistrict, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach City College, and the CaliforniaConference for Equality and Justice committed to actively support the application and eventualProject implementation.Partnerships and CollaborationsThe Long Beach Project’s mission is to create a collaboration of educational, prevention andintervention based programs, as well as related support systems designed to provide essentialeducational, career, social and life skills development training and services to at-risk youth andadults in the Long Beach Police Beats 4 and 5. In addition, attention will be given to ex-offenders in need of a second chance to reconstitute their lives and become viable, productive,and contributing members of the community. This will be demonstrated by resource referralsand program sponsorships. Moreover, this collaboration will incorporate a comprehensive 50
  • resource network involving subject matter experts from local schools, community college anduniversity systems, local officials and agencies, as well as businesses, religious organizationsand other non-profit entities.The City of Long Beach consistently builds new relationships with jurisdictions and agencies inthe target area, as well as regionally. The Office of the City Manager Human Dignity Officerattends monthly meetings of the Los Angeles County Inter-Agency Gang Task Force alongsidethe Long Beach Police Department. Through this collaboration, relationships have been builtwith the Countywide Criminal Justice Coordination Committee (CCJCC). Most noteworthy, as aresult of this relationship, the City of Long Beach Human Dignity Program assisted the CCJCCin hosting one of its four annual Ex-Offender Reentry Job and Resource Fairs at Long BeachCity College in the fall of 2007. CCJCC’s Executive Director has agreed to sit on the Cal GRIP/Long Beach Project Coordinating and Advisory Council. This is advantageous to the LongBeach Project, as the County’s Juvenile Justice Coordinating Council is a standingsubcommittee of the CCJCC. If funded, the proposed Violence Prevention Coordinator willnetwork with appropriate jurisdictions and agencies in order to maintain relationships andestablish new partnerships.Coordination StrategiesThe collaborative partnerships included herein are important assets that will lead toward thepreparation of individuals to become functioning, thriving, contributing members of our society.It is necessary to expose at-risk youth, young adults, as well as ex-offenders to multipleresources which provide avenues to contemplate his/her role and place in society and makewell informed decisions to improve his/her future. 51
  • The City of Long Beach is noted for its many community and neighborhood outreach agencies,associations and organizations that service youth and young adults. The members of this socialservice community offer a variety of programs to area residents, students, and religious groupsranging from academic skills development, job training and job placement services, to theprovision of basic human services. In providing this assistance, several issues continue tohinder or keep these entities from maximizing their fullest outreach potential. It is theoverarching mission of the Long Beach Project to coalesce these services to function efficientlyand effectively. Detailed below are key points of integrating the services: • Exposure – Most of these services do not have the resources to fully advertise or promote their programs. Many individuals, organizations, agencies, schools and other groups that could benefit from these outreach programs are not aware or do not have access to them or their services. The Long Beach Project will support City youth Safe Havens to serve as an overarching resource for information and access to the myriad of services available to the targeted population. • Resources – Many organizations are operating on very minimal budgets and do not have the personnel or time to generate the ongoing support necessary to expand or enhance their programs. Competition remains high for the meager resources from a dwindling pot of funding resources. This creates much duplication of effort in relation to fundraising and resource acquisition. The Long Beach Project will support City efforts to encourage community organizations to co-submit grants to fulfill the social service needs and gaps of the target community. • Coordination – There is conflict in the scheduling of community outreach events and very little coordination in the provisioning of services to overlapping constituencies. Where there have been collaborative efforts with the sharing of responsibility for the 52
  • rendering of service, they are very successful. The Long Beach Project will refer interested parties to City Safe Havens, which will serve as a source of information about a range of available programs and sources for assistance, as well as a means to provide an assessment of the potential areas for improvement.The Long Beach Project Coordinating and Advisory CouncilThe proposed Long Beach Project has a strong infrastructure, which has informed the Project’splan in the target area. The City of Long Beach Youth and Gang Violence Prevention TaskForce (Task Force) was established in 2004 as a result of the November 2003 report entitled“Interim Report and Re-examination of the Problems of Youth and Gang Violence in the City ofLong Beach” which was submitted to the Mayor and City Council by the Human RelationsCommission. Since then, law enforcement, educational, faith-based, business, community,neighborhood organizations and residents have been committed to the efforts of the TaskForce. Throughout the past four years, the Task Force has focused on the following issues:youth and gang violence, delinquency prevention, workforce development, parent and familyservices, media and public awareness, as well as community education and mobilization. TheTask Force is supported by a Resource Team composed of various City department staff whoassist with the volunteer Task Force members’ efforts.The Task Force was also formed with the intention of convening an advisory ExecutiveCommittee—high-level officials and key players in the community. The Cal GRIP Grant hasprovided a valuable opportunity to convene the Executive Committee for the purposes ofoversight of the Long Beach Project, if funded. Therefore, the Long Beach Project Coordinatingand Advisory Council (Council) will be formed out of connections originally built by the TaskForce. The Council will serve as the supervision entity for the Cal GRIP Grant process and will 53
  • also serve as the Executive Committee to oversee the City’s Youth and Gang ViolencePrevention Task Force.MembershipMembership of the Long Beach Project Coordinating and Advisory Council (Council) will includeCity officials, local law enforcement, the county sheriff’s office, probation, district attorney, localeducational agencies, school districts, the county office of education, and community-basedorganizations. Council meetings will be held in the Police Department Community room next toCity Hall. The room has been reserved for the third Wednesday of each month, though Councilmeetings may only be scheduled quarterly. Council membership request letters have beendistributed and we are anticipating, in early 2008, to receive a return response from 50 percentof the invitees who will confirm their interest and acceptance of Council membership. Listedbelow are those who have been invited to join the Council:City Officials 1. Dee Andrews City of Long Beach 6th District Councilman 2. Bob Foster City of Long Beach Mayor 3. Reginald Harrison City of Long Beach Deputy City Manager Vice Mayor, 1st District 4. Bonnie Lowenthal City of Long Beach Councilwoman 7th District 5. Tonia Reyes Uranga City of Long Beach Councilwoman 6. Patrick H. West City of Long Beach City ManagerSheriff’s Department Los Angeles Sheriffs 7. Ray Bercini Department Deputy, GREAT Team Prevention Intervention Los Angeles Sheriffs Specialist and Executive 8. Brian Center Department Director, A Better LAProbation Los Angeles County 9. Sam Banuelos Probation Department Supervisor 54
  • Los Angeles County Probation Department - San Gabriella Valley 10. John Clark Probationary Office Asian Gang Unit Los Angeles County Probation Department - Centinella Probation 11. Carol Mayes Area Office Gang Unit Transition to Los Angeles County Permanency Project 12. Kim Powers Probation Department Program Coordinator 13. Charlene Vartanian Long Beach Probation Director Los Angeles County 14. Dave Wong Probation Department Probation OfficerDistrict Attorney Los Angeles County 15. John Allen District Attorneys Office - Los Angeles County 16. John Guilligan District Attorneys Office - Los Angeles County District Attorneys Victim 17. Lynn Kim Assistance Program Director Field Deputy, Bureau of Los Angeles County Crime Prevention & 18. Wayne Mack District Attorneys Office Youth ServicesOther Law Enforcement Long Beach Police 19. Anthony Batts Department Chief Long Beach Bar Foundation Shortstop 20. Carolyn Bell Program Director Long Beach Police Deputy Chief, 21. William Blair Department Investigations Bureau Sergeant, West Long Beach Police Division, Directed 22. Richard Conant Department Enforcement Team Long Beach Police 23. Laura Farinella Department Commander Long Beach Police 24. Ty Hatfield Department Lieutenant Gang and Violent Crime Long Beach Police Division, Gang 25. David Hendricks Department Enforcement Section 55
  • Department of Corrections & 26. Patricia Lee Rehabilitation Supervisor Long Beach Police 27. Bob Luman Department COPS Program Acting Law Enforcement 28. Ted Marquez US Attorneys Office Manager 29. Tom Reeves City of Long Beach City Prosecutor 30. Claire Vermillion LA Superior Court Court Referee Drug Enforcement Demand Reduction 31. Lance Williams Administration CoordinatorSchool Districts Long Beach Unified School District Parent/Teacher Chair, Health and 32. Birgit De La Torre Association Safety Committee 33. Edward Garcia Whittier Elementary Principal 34. Stefanie Holzman Roosevelt Elementary Principal 35. Victor Jarels Polytechnic High School Principal Long Beach School for Adults and Reid 36. Fitzgerald Jones Continuation School Principal Long Beach Unified 37. Martha Klevos School District GED Chief Examiner Washington Middle 38. Connie McKivett School Principal Educational Partnership 39. Gregory Mendoza High School Principal Long Beach Unified 40. Frankie Parker School District Educator 41. Terri Rennard Butler School Principal 42. Lucy Salazar Burnett Elementary Principal Principal, Evening High Long Beach Unified School and Director, 43. Matt Saldana School District ROP Santos- 44. Cecilia Camerino Lincoln Elementary Principal 45. Parisima Shahidi Alvarado Elementary Principal Long Beach Unified 46. Chris Steinhauser School District Superintendent Franklin Classical Middle 47. David Taylor School Principal 56
  • Long Beach Unified 48. Felton Williams School District Board PresidentCounty Office of Education Los Angeles County Office of Education, Dorothy Kirby Center Special Education 49. Scott Bastian School Teacher Los Angeles County Coordinator, Safe 50. Gus Frias Office of Education Schools Program Los Angeles County Office of Education, Supervising Deputy 51. Kelly Glossev Dorothy Kirby Center Probation OfficerOther Educational Agency California State 52. F. King Alexander University, Long Beach President 53. Phyllis Arias Long Beach City College Instructor California State University, Long Beach, 54. Venetta Campbell Dept. of Social Work Instructor Long Beach City College, Women and 55. Anita Gibbins Mens Resource Center Manager 56. Daniel Morales Long Beach Head Start Staff 57. Gail B. Schwandner Long Beach City College Workforce Development California State Director, Negotiation University, Dominguez Conflict Resolution & 58. Dr. Marco Turk, J.D. Hills Peacebuilding Program Long Beach City College 59. Roberto Uranga Board of Trustees Trustee 60. TBD Long Beach City College PresidentCommunity-Based Organizations, Businesses and Community Members 61. Rich Archbold Press Telegram Executive Editor YMCA of Greater Long 62. Sue Baker Beach Sr. Vice President County of Los Angeles Department of Children Childrens Social 63. Kathleen Brown, MSW and Family Services Worker Antioch Missionary 64. Wayne Chaney, Jr. Baptist Church Pastor 65. Veronica Davalos The Childrens Clinic - 57
  • Countywide Criminal Justice Coordination66. Mark Delgado Committee - CCJCC Executive Director67. Kim Evans Forest Lawn Vice President International Realty &68. Ivy Goolsby Investments, Inc. Marketing Director Friends Outside, LA69. Elizabeth Griffin County -70. Garon Harden Ministers Alliance Chair / Mattie Academy Former Director of LBUSD Student71. Karen Hilburn - Placement Services72. Dianne Jacobus Port of Long Beach Protocol Officer Department of Mental73. Ann Lee Health Social Worker Long Beach Rescue74. James Lewis Mission President and CEO Human Relations75. Richard Lewis Commission Chair Los Angeles County Commission on Human Racialized Gang76. Tony Massengil Relations Violence Coordinator Commission on Youth77. Jeanetta McAlpin and Children Member Long Beach Chamber of78. Janet McCarthy Commerce Board Member79. Michelle Molina PeacePartners, Inc. President Government Public80. Mike Murray Verizon Relations Director81. Janet Netterton Knight Foundation Community Liaison82. Amelia Nieto Centro Shalom Director Cambodian Association83. Sony Pream of America - Perez- Department of Children84. Derrick Johnson and Family Services -85. Elder Eddie Pierson Academic Up Rise, Inc. Director United Cambodian86. Sara Pol-Lim Community (UCC) Director87. June Pouesi Office of Samoan Affairs - Centro CHA Inc. (Community Hispanic Executive Director and88. Jessica Quintana Association) President 58
  • President & California NAACP - Long Beach State Conference 89. Naomi Rainey Branch Secretary 90. Karen Reside Boys and Girls Club Director 91. Ahmed Saafir Civil Service Department President Work Based Learning 92. Nadith Schuster Long Beach JobCorps Coordinator LB Community Action 93. Darick J. Simpson Agency Director Antioch Missionary 94. Steven Warfield Baptist Church Assistant Mentoring, A Touch from 95. Melanie Washington Above CEO 96. Craig Watson Charter Communications Vice PresidentCity Staff and Affiliates City of Long Beach, Role of Men Academy / 1. Leonard Adams Midnight Basketball Director City of Long Beach, Community Development 2. LaVerne Duncan Department Housing Comm. Officer Assistant Administration Analyst II, Neighborhood Resource 3. Jason Fraley City of Long Beach Center Director, Department of Parks, Recreation and 4. Phil Hester City of Long Beach Marine Executive Producer, Long Beach Television, 5. Sandra Holden City of Long Beach Channel 8 Manager, Youth 6. Suzanne McMillan City of Long Beach Services Community Development 7. Chantara Nop City of Long Beach Department Executive Director, Workforce Investment 8. Bryan Rogers City of Long Beach Bureau Manager, Bureau of Schneider- Human and Social 9. Corinne Jones City of Long Beach Services 59
  • Station Manager, Long Beach Television, 10. Dean Smits City of Long Beach Channel 8 Supervisor, Weed and 11. Michael St. Jean City of Long Beach Seed Recreation 12. Ted Stevens City of Long Beach Superintendent Director, Community Development 13. Dennis Thys City of Long Beach Department Bureau Manager, 14. Darnisa Tyler City of Long Beach Housing AuthorityStrategic Roles and ResponsibilitiesThe Long Beach Project Coordinating and Advisory Council (Council) will act as the governingbody, providing the overall leadership, management and final approval of all activities related tothe Long Beach Project. The Council will meet quarterly to monitor the Project’s progress andevaluate its effectiveness. At these meetings, representatives of the community served will beinvited to participate and provide input. The Council will offer guidance, consider all concernsbrought forth, provide discussion, establish committees to research warranted issues, andprovide final approval to any recommended changes. The Council will also be responsible foridentifying potential funding sources for the project and maintaining due diligence on anycontracts that may come from these sources.Project EvaluationLong Beach Project staff and the Coordinating and Advisory Council will be responsible foroversight of Project assessments. Individuals will be divided into committees to organize thecompletion of these duties in a systematic way so as to prevent placing a burden on any oneindividual or agency. These review committees will: 60
  • • Conduct regular risk and resource assessment, including reviewing and interpreting data, monitoring and evaluating programs. • Provide leadership and support to the target community and to the agencies implementing services. • Review reports submitted by all components to monitor the completion of goals and objectives, ensure compliance, and make recommendations for improvement in order to develop a comprehensive action plan that is compatible with the resources, groups and programs already operating in the community.The Long Beach Project Coordinator (Violence Prevention Coordinator) will report through theCoordinating and Advisory Council. However, from an organizational standpoint, theCoordinator will be an employee of the City of Long Beach and will operate out of the Office ofthe City Manager.The Coordinating and Advisory Council will be responsible for policy level decision-making whiledaily operational issues will come through the Office of the City Manager by way of theCoordinator. Monitoring of Project activities and services will be led through the Coordinator andthe Human Dignity Officer. All activities relating to implementation on a day-to-day basis will bebrought to Coordinating and Advisory Council quarterly meetings for analysis, evaluation andapproval. This information will be reviewed to ensure that the overall strategy is in alignmentwith the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services vision as well as target area initiatives andgoals.DutiesThe Coordinating and Advisory Council’s general duties are as follows: 61
  • • Meet a minimum of four times a year, with additional meetings as necessary; • Serve as active participants in all aspects of the project, including education, promotion, implementation of strategies and community mobilization and restoration.The City of Long Beach Office of the City Manager will be the administrative agency for theLong Beach Project, funded by the Cal GRIP Grant. A funded Violence Prevention Coordinatorposition will serve as the Long Beach Project Coordinator to administer the Project and willreport to the City’s Human Dignity Officer who will serve as the Project Director, both located inthe City Manager’s Office.Qualifications of Key StaffKey personnel assigned to the grant include project directorship led by the Human Dignity Officer inconjunction with the proposed Violence Prevention Coordinator (both housed in the Office of theCity Manager), the Fiscal Officer, the Intervention/Prevention Officer (Long Beach PoliceDepartment), and a part-time Community Health Worker (Department of Health and HumanServices). Listed below are these positions’ qualifications.Human Dignity OfficerThe Human Dignity Program, located in the Office of the City Manager, houses the City’scurrent youth and gang violence prevention efforts. The Human Dignity Officer, MelissaMorgan, will serve as the Long Beach Project Director. Position qualifications include: • Graduation from an accredited college or university with a Bachelor’s Degree in a field related to the position; • Excellent oral and interpersonal skills with the ability to interact effectively with a variety of persons from all socioeconomic levels; 62
  • • Skill to effectively listen, analyze and respond to a variety of concerns; • Self-starter with strong organizational skills and experience in administering programs; • Excellent writing skills with the ability to prepare clear, concise reports and communications; • Able to respond with flexibility to changing or competing priorities; • Negotiating skills; and • Knowledge of local government operations.Violence Prevention CoordinatorThe Violence Prevention Coordinator will be housed in the Office of the City Manager HumanDignity Program as a contract employee. The position of the Violence Prevention Coordinator iscurrently vacant. This Coordinator will serve as Long Beach Project Coordinator and will reportto the Human Dignity Officer. Position qualifications include: • (Same as the Human Dignity Officer); • Professional experience that offers specific and substantial preparation for the duties of the position may be substituted for the required education on a year-for-year basis; • Experience with youth and gang violence prevention and/or intervention; and • Grant-writing experience.Fiscal OfficerThe fiscal agent of the Long Beach Project is the City of Long Beach Office of the City Manager.The fiscal agent agrees to manage all future Long Beach Project funds as approved by the LongBeach Project Coordinating and Advisory Council and in accordance with the Governor’s Officeof Emergency Services Financial Guidelines. The Fiscal Officer/Financial Officer for the Project 63
  • is the City’s Director of Financial Management/CFO, Lori Ann Farrell. Position qualificationsinclude: • Experience in managing finance, administration, and personnel; • Ability to manage multiple tasks; • Proficient in computer use and software programs for complex business solutions applications; • Knowledge of accounting and reporting requirements for cities and a thorough understanding of the laws (Federal, Sate and local), which impact fiscal planning and accounting practices; • Understanding and knowledge of budget techniques and applications, including capital budgeting, its financing and long-term planning; and • Understanding of general and local economic conditions, proposed and enacted legislations as to the direct impact on current and future revenues, and the impact of such legislation on the City’s debt structure.Intervention/Prevention OfficerThe Intervention/Prevention Officer position will be located in the Long Beach PoliceDepartment Youth Services Division. The Officer will fulfill Intervention/Prevention duties on atime-and-a-half basis (10 hours per week). The position of the Intervention/Prevention Officer iscurrently vacant. Position qualifications include: • Background in Police Department prevention programming (i.e., DARE Instruction, GREAT Instruction, prior teaching experience, gang investigations, Police Athletic League Officer, Juvenile Investigations Detective, Missing Persons Investigations); • Proven background with prior assignments; • Ability to be creative; 64
  • • Excellent networking skills; and • Compassion for youth and ability to connect with at-risk youth and their families.Community Health Worker (Department of Health and Human Services)This part-time worker will work directly for the City’s Weed and Seed Coordinator in order toincrease the number of youth and families served by the established Weed and Seed program.This will include supporting efforts at the City’s youth Safe Haven sites. The position of theCommunity Health Worker is currently vacant. Position qualifications include: • High school diploma or equivalent; • Two years of experience working in outreach programs; • Education may be substituted for experience on a year-for-year basis; and • A valid California motor vehicle operator’s license may be required.ConclusionThe application of grant funding from the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services toward theLong Beach Gang Reduction, Intervention and Prevention Project will have a considerableimpact on in the lives of many residents in the city of Long Beach, particularly at-risk youth.Financial support will help key leaders to achieve their mission to create a collaboration ofeducational, prevention and intervention based programs, as well as related support systemsdesigned to provide essential educational, career, social and life skills development training andservices to at-risk youth and adults in the areas of Long Beach that are most in need of attentionand support. Through the Cal GRIP grant, collaborations will be formed and strengthened,support systems will be designed, skills will be developed, education will be promoted, familieswill be strengthened and lives will be changed for the better. This prospect of funding comes at 65
  • an opportune time. Crucial elements are aligned to address the plague of gang violence in thecity of Long Beach, California. The time is now. 66