LYRASIS Mammoth materials unit3
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LYRASIS Mammoth materials unit3 LYRASIS Mammoth materials unit3 Presentation Transcript

  • Mammoth Materials How to Preserve Posters, Maps & Drawings LYRASIS Preservation Services Funded in part by a grant from the National National Endowment for the Humanities, Humanities, Division of Preservation and and Access Unit 3
  • Unit 3 • Storage basics • Supply terminology • Flat vs. rolled storage • General rules for oversized storage
  • Storage Basics • Identifying our oversized materials helps us to figure out how to store them. • These storage basics will apply not only to oversized materials, but mixed media collections.
  • Storage Basics • Controlling temperature & humidity is the single most cost-effective action we can take to impact every item in the collection. When dealing with a variety of types of media, a good range to aim for is: – 68 – 72 degrees F – 40 – 50% RH • Good air circulation is important to help prevent mold. • Avoid basement or attic storage- temperature and humidity are too hard to control in these areas.
  • Storage Basics • Avoid direct sunlight--sunlight contains harmful ultraviolet rays and also often increases temperature. Reducing direct exposure is especially important for any oversized material that is susceptible to fading. • Store oversized materials in Flat File Cabinets or rolled storage. This should be at least 4 inches off the floor to prevent water damage, mop splashes, or damage from foot or cart damage.
  • Terminology for Supplies • Archival quality • Acid-free • Lignin and lig-free • Alkaline buffered • Photo-safe
  • Terminology for Supplies • Archival Quality – This term does not have a meaning in and of itself. It alone does not represent a measurable standard. Do not rely on this phrase alone to indicate a product is appropriate to use.
  • Terminology for Supplies • Acid-free – This indicates that when made, the product was tested for pH level of acidity – alkalinity and was found to be neutral or slightly alkaline. – Acid-free is paper, folders and boxes are recommended for the storage of archival and library materials.
  • Terminology for Supplies • Lignin and lig-free – Lignin is a natural component of trees. It allows for the break down of the wood after the tree has died. Desirable in nature, not in products made from wood. – Look for products that are lignin free. This may not indicate zero lignin, but indicates very low levels based on industry standards.
  • Terminology for Supplies • Alkaline buffered – May also see the term “buffered,” this indicates an alkaline reserve in the paper or box that will slow the acid deterioration inherent in some paper and printing processes. – Buffered paper and boxes are not always the best choice. They can actually damage some printing processes. That will be discussed in upcoming slides.
  • Terminology for Supplies • Photo-safe – This is a phrase that does not indicate any specific standards. The phrase to look for is that the product has “Passed the Photographic Activity Test (PAT).” This means that the product will not react negatively with photographic processes or emulsion layers of photographic prints.
  • Size Matters • In a perfect world, Oversized items should be stored flat – however, for really large items, rolling may be your only option. • A good rule of thumb—if something is larger than 15 x 9 inches – the size of a standard legal document box—it should be stored flat.
  • Size Matters • Archival boxes made out of the same materials as document boxes (i.e. blue-grey board or sometimes tan board), are great for items under 30 x 40 inches – they come in a variety of sizes. Depths are anywhere between 1 ½ in & 3 inch widths. Store them flat on shelves, as you see below.
  • Size Matters • For anything larger than 30 x 40 inches, items should be stored in flat file cabinets. New flat files should be powder-coated and heat cured steel. Avoid wood or damaging metals files. If that’s all you have then line drawers with an inert barrier such as Polyester sheet. • Always get the “riser” which will elevate your materials off the ground – away from water and feet.
  • Flat File Cabinets DO • Do use file drawer composed of baked enamel with solvent free powder coating of polymers • Do plan for expansion – leave a spare drawer in each case and room in each drawer • Do remove folders from drawers one at a time DO NOT • Do not fill drawers more than 2 inches high or overcrowd folders • Do not fold maps to fit folder or drawer sizes • Do not label items or folders with ink – use only graphite pencil • Do not use wooden shelving without appropriate barriers
  • Rolled Storage • There is the ideal and the realistic. Some of us have so many rolled items that unrolling everything is not an option. Flat files are expensive and take up lots of space. Prioritize by importance, use, etc. • Also, if your oversized material is large enough, it may not fit in your flat file.
  • Proper Rolled Storage • Roll on OUTSIDE of acid-free tube that is at least 6 inches in diameter. • Use tubes that are longer than edges of the materials being rolled. • Wrap with acid-free tissue, either buffered or unbuffered depending on the type of process. – More discussion of this in a few more slides. • Tie with plain cotton twill tape to secure.
  • Proper Rolled Storage • If something is heavily used, wrapping it with paper may not make a lot of sense, because you’ll spend a lot of time wrapping and unwrapping. Instead, it might be better to encapsulate that item to protect it from dust, and then acid-free paper will not be needed.
  • Properly Rolled Storage ? What’s going on here? Do you see any potential problems with how these items are rolled?
  • Properly Rolled Storage ? • Textile looks ok but could use covering. If it is important to see the textiles, wrap them in clear mylar sheeting instead of paper • Others look like they are rolled to tightly- would be better on the outside of the tube.
  • Telescoping Containers Instead of wrapping the outside, another option is the square long tubes often described as telescoping containers. They are typically made of same material as document boxes. Be certain the box is long enough for the item is contains. There may be wear if you need to slide the rolled item out frequently.
  • Folders • Folders should meet Z39.48 (2002) standard for permanent paper – Alkaline buffered or unbuffered – .10 point for small maps – .20 point or thicker for larger formats or fragile materials • Folder dimensions should be slightly larger than the objects • Folders should fit into drawers or boxes without folding or bending
  • Oversize Folders • Can purchase from reputable vendor – See Lyrasis vendor pages http://www.lyrasis.org/Preservation/Search-For-Vendors.aspx • To make your own: − 10 or 20 pt board (comes in 30x40 and 60x40 inch sizes) − Tyvek tape (spun polyester with a pH neutral acrylic adhesive) Fold board in half or cut board to correct size and make hinge with Tyvek tape
  • Buffered or Unbuffered? Buffered Paper/Board • Stencil Reproductions • Gel-Lithographs • Electrostatic • Manuscript Maps • Printed and handcolored Maps • Full-Color Printed Posters • Art on Paper • Posters Unbuffered Paper/Board • Hectographs • Van Dyke Prints • Diazo & Sepia Diazo Prints • Blueprints • Positive Blueprints/ Pellet Prints • Photostats • Ferrogallic Prints • Aniline Prints
  • Buffered or Unbuffered? When in doubt, choose unbuffered folder, board, and boxes.
  • General Rules of Oversized Storage • Store like items together: Printed maps on paper together, Blue prints together, Photo processes together, etc. Do not to mix the various types within the same folder, some print types are harmful to others. If not possible, isolate problematic types using polyester sleeves.
  • General Rules of Oversized Storage • Polyester can be used with all of these EXCEPT Electrostatic (xeroxograpy, photocopy) or Pastel artwork. Plastic can lift off toner or other friable media (pastel, charcoal). • Folder by processes, not by size – opposite of the rules for photographs • Separate by process type within a folder using paper dividers (acid-free) alkaline buffered for most items.
  • General Rules of Oversized Storage • Know which processes are sensitive to alkaline buffered paper and board products If you don’t want to buy two different types of boxes, folders, use Polyester sheets (or sleeves) for items that are sensitive to alkaline environments =e.g. blueprints. • Unroll items only if the substrate is in good condition and you have a place to store it.
  • Section 3 Quiz What did you learn?
  • Section 3 Quiz Question 1: • Materials handling best practices suggest that items of like size should be stored together. –True or False?
  • Section 3 Quiz Question 1: • Materials handling best practices suggest that items of like size should be stored together. –True or False? Answer : True This practice reduces the “wear” of edges against each other within a folder or drawer.
  • Section 3 Quiz Question 2: • The best way to store an oversized item on a roll is to roll it around an acid free core that is at least 6” larger than the item, cover the rolled object with a paper or inert plastic sheet and tie it with cotton tape. –True or False?
  • Section 3 Quiz Question 2: • The best way to store an oversized item on a roll is to roll it around an acid free core that is at least 6” larger than the item, cover the rolled object with a paper or inert plastic sheet and tie it with cotton tape. – True or False? Answer : True This is the suggested best practice.
  • Section 3 Quiz Question 3: • It is recommended that a flat storage case should be put on a riser. Why? – A. to protect lower drawers from water on the floor – B. To protect lower drawers from feet. – C. For ease of access. – D. All of the above.
  • Section 3 Quiz Question 3: • It is recommended that a flat storage case should be put on a riser. Why? – A. to protect lower drawers from water on the floor – B. To protect lower drawers from feet. – C. For ease of access. – D. All of the above. Answer : D. All of the above This is the suggested best practice.
  • Thank You! To continue Mammoth Materials, View Unit 4 Contact us if you have any questions. LYRASIS Preservation Services preservation@lyrasis.org