QUESTION AUTHORITY Evaluating Internet Resources
You need information… for a research project what to feed your new pet which candidate to vote for how to get a driver’s l...
<ul><li>When you pick up a book in the library, you know: </li></ul><ul><li>An expert author was chosen by a reputable pub...
But when you visit a web site, you  must do the work of all those experts to decide whether to use the information
You won’t always have  a parent or a teacher or a librarian to tell you  whether a site is good. You must learn how to  us...
What makes a web site good?
Accuracy
Information matches the facts in other sources  No factual errors,  grammar mistakes or typos Sources are cited  Evaluate ...
Authority
Author is identified  & contact info given Author is an expert   Reputable organization/sponsor  Writing style & tone matc...
Break down URL for clues: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Acne/default.asp protocol://hostorganization.domain/filepat...
Bias
Purpose of site or audience  is clear: inform/entertain/advocate/ change opinion/promote/sell   Minimum of pop-ups & ads F...
Currency
Information is recent  & frequently updated Includes new (unique) information   Internal & external links are working Eval...
Coverage
Topic is covered in detail Information is not missing Too much vs.  not enough information  Evaluate a site
Relevance
Information answers your questions Format is useful Reading level is appropriate Intended audience matches your purpose Ev...
Sources: Beck, Susan. “The Good, the bad & the ugly: Or, why it’s a good idea to evaluate web sources.” 1997.   http://lib...
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Question authority

  1. 1. QUESTION AUTHORITY Evaluating Internet Resources
  2. 2. You need information… for a research project what to feed your new pet which candidate to vote for how to get a driver’s license about a disease afflicting someone in your family the best car for the money what kind of job you want and how to get it how to fix something about a place you want to visit who invented ice cream?
  3. 3. <ul><li>When you pick up a book in the library, you know: </li></ul><ul><li>An expert author was chosen by a reputable publisher </li></ul><ul><li>an editor checked facts and improved the writing </li></ul><ul><li>a reviewer evaluated/recommended it </li></ul><ul><li>a librarian determined it a worthy and appropriate resource… </li></ul>
  4. 4. But when you visit a web site, you must do the work of all those experts to decide whether to use the information
  5. 5. You won’t always have a parent or a teacher or a librarian to tell you whether a site is good. You must learn how to use your judgment.
  6. 6. What makes a web site good?
  7. 7. Accuracy
  8. 8. Information matches the facts in other sources No factual errors, grammar mistakes or typos Sources are cited Evaluate a site
  9. 9. Authority
  10. 10. Author is identified & contact info given Author is an expert Reputable organization/sponsor Writing style & tone match the material Evaluate a site
  11. 11. Break down URL for clues: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Acne/default.asp protocol://hostorganization.domain/filepath/code Erase from the right to get to host Domain isn’t always reliable
  12. 12. Bias
  13. 13. Purpose of site or audience is clear: inform/entertain/advocate/ change opinion/promote/sell Minimum of pop-ups & ads Fact vs. opinion Evaluate a site
  14. 14. Currency
  15. 15. Information is recent & frequently updated Includes new (unique) information Internal & external links are working Evaluate a site
  16. 16. Coverage
  17. 17. Topic is covered in detail Information is not missing Too much vs. not enough information Evaluate a site
  18. 18. Relevance
  19. 19. Information answers your questions Format is useful Reading level is appropriate Intended audience matches your purpose Evaluate a site
  20. 20. Sources: Beck, Susan. “The Good, the bad & the ugly: Or, why it’s a good idea to evaluate web sources.” 1997. http://lib.nmsu.edu/instruction/evalcrit.html Engle, Michael. “Evaluating Web Sites: Criteria and Tools.” 2009. http://www.library.cornell.edu/olinuris/ref/research/webeval.html Finkle, Dagmar. NJASL Conference Web Evaluation Presentation. 2009. http://web.me.com/dfinkle2/Message/NJASL.html UC Berkeley Library. “Evaluating Web Pages: Techniques to Apply & Questions to Ask.” 2009. http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/Guides/Internet/Evaluate.html Presentation created by Leigh Woznick, 2009.
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