Web 2.0:  All Students Can Learn
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Web 2.0: All Students Can Learn

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Presentation,Oct 2009, Collegeboard Conference

Presentation,Oct 2009, Collegeboard Conference

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  • COMMENT (JTR): I think we should hide this slide and merely note it rather than show it. The less slides we have and the more we share the better.
  • COMMENT (JTR): We can provide an outline though not sure we need to actually break it down with the presenter’s name. Maybe once Linda and Andrew add in we can tidy this up a bit.
  • You’ve heard a little bit about what Web 2.0 is and how its used in one school…..So, what is the challenge?What types of challenges do you face in your classroom, school, district, etc as it pertains to Web 2.0?Any? Many?We’ve brought some challenges to light. Good. But what is it really about?FLIP SLIDE
  • CHANGE!Examples (use blog post to expand on this idea)The challenge is change (can’t have one without the other really) and not whether IF we should but HOW we should.So what we see happening out there (whether public or private schools) is…..Web 2.0 in Education: Policy, Practice, and Progress (CoSN Compendium 2009)By James BoscoProfessor Emeritus in the Dept. of Educational Studies at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, MichiganFrom December 2008 to February 2009, CoSN conducted an online survey of school administrators to determine their perspective on such questions. According to the survey, district administrators overwhelmingly believe in the educational value of Web 2.0 and expect that Web 2.0 will require a new type of teacher training and result in a blending between formal and informal learning. And yet most respondents say that Web 2.0 tools have not yet been integrated into their district’s curriculum.The way in which school districts respond to the opportunities and challenges of implementing Web 2.0 in classrooms falls into three categories:1) Trying to protect students and instructional time by banning Web 2.0 or setting policies to keep it “safe.”2) Preserving existing programs and practices by using technology in a way that “fits” into what is already in place.3) Taking a progressive approach based on the idea of discontinuous change that allows technology to transform the organization rather than moving it faster and further on its existing path.
  • What is discontinuous change? It’s change that actually changes direction from the path we once set ourselves upon.Web 2.0 in Education: Policy, Practice, and Progress (CoSN Compendium 2009)By James BoscoTaking a progressive approach based on the idea of discontinuous change that allows technology to transform the organization rather than moving it faster and further on its existing path.
  • Innovations started in the late 1990’s and early 2000’s that allowed us to begin to take advantage of digital tools in the classroom.Web 2.0 is not just about changing how we teach, it’s about innovation. And not just innovation, but value-added innovation in our classrooms, schools, and districts.5 years into Web 2.0 and with Web 3.0 around the corner and we’re still working on catching up.Folks are just adopting Web 2.0 (or still have not yet) and we’re starting to talk about Web 3.0 – Google Wave anyone?
  • Innovations started in the late 1990’s and early 2000’s that allowed us to begin to take advantage of digital tools in the classroom.Web 2.0 is not just about changing how we teach, it’s about innovation. And not just innovation, but value-added innovation in our classrooms, schools, and districts.5 years into Web 2.0 and with Web 3.0 around the corner and we’re still working on catching up.Folks are just adopting Web 2.0 (or still have not yet) and we’re starting to talk about Web 3.0 – Google Wave anyone?Why is change so hard? Step back to 1956…
  • Benjamin Bloom (Ed. Psychologists) found that over 95 % of the test questions students encounter require them to think only at the lowest possible level...the recall of information.So, one would argue, we are not much further along today. However, 53 years later….what happens if we apply Bloom’s Taxonomy to Web 2.0?http://www.officeport.com/edu/blooms.htm
  • The challenge of change comes when students access to information is instantaneous and easy. This is particularly useful for those long-tail learners…the ones that have a specific interest.But it is also a fantastic tool, as showcased today, for the traditional classroom as well – possibly extending its boundaries. And helping to push students to analyze, evaluate, and create – but most importantly collaborate.What happens, however, when access to these tools is denied?
  • If your school or district limits access and your Web 2.0 world looks like this, what are your options?Certainly depends on your students’ access to the Internet.If you are in an area with good Internet access penetration consider starting your own site or blog into which you can bring these tools, especially the examples of Jing.
  • I would challenge that you can not have innovation without risk. Thoughts?So as much as this presentation is about what you can do in the classroom with Web 2.0 tools I would contend it should also be about what YOU can do to help further the message in your school, district, etc. in regard to how Web 2.0 is shaping education today.http://www.classroom20.comthe social network for those interested in Web 2.0 and collaborative technologies in education. We encourage you to sign up to participate in the great discussions here, to receive event notifications, and to find and connect with colleagues.
  • So what should be the essential questions you need to take with you today?
  • Am I able to teach critical thinking skills using Web 2.0 applications? Am I able to create resilient, flexible, and creative mindsets in my students using Web 2.0 applications? Am I able to use Web 2.0 applications to effectively address challenges in my classroom? What are the obstacles to Web 2.0 that exist in my school and how can I work to overcome them?

Web 2.0:  All Students Can Learn Web 2.0: All Students Can Learn Presentation Transcript

  • Web 2.0 Tools: all students can learn
    CONVENT OF THE SACRED HEART (Greenwich, CT)
    Andrew Byrne, Dean of Faculty
    Joel Padilla, Upper School Math
    Linda Vasu, Upper School English
    RAVENSCROFT SCHOOL (Raleigh, NC)
    Jason Ramsden, Chief Technology Officer
  • Public and Private Education Disclaimer
     
    • We are all employed at independent day schools (www.nais.org).
    • All tools and techniques discussed in this presentation are free and can be accessed by anyone who has a computer connected to the internet.
    • We have made a sincere effort to capture the reality of public school education whenever possible
  • Overview
    Introduction
    Classroom Tools
    Implementation
    High Order Thinking
  • What is Web 2.0?
    • Web 2.0 is a term coined by Tim O'Reilly in 2004
    • Wikipedia states the following: "Web 2.0" is commonly associated with web development and web design that facilitates interactive information sharing, interoperability, user-centered design and collaboration on the World Wide Web.“
    • In short, it is a new paradigm by which to view the use of the Web.
  • JOEL PADILLA
  • MOODLE
    Effective use of a Learning Management System (LMS)
  • Moodle
    Recreating the classroom experience through:
    Course structure
    Online layout
    Student collaboration
    Resources for students
    Teacher guidance
  • Structure
    • Organization
    • Connection betweenclassroom experienceand online resources
  • Lessons
    • Corresponding section in the book
    • Resources
    • Assessments
  • Student Collaboration
    • Forum
    • Integrated math equation editor
    • Formative assessment
  • Help from Teacher
    • Forums
    • Videos
  • JING
    Providing a Powerful Student Resource
  • Jing Video
    • Student Pace
    • Familiarity
    • Timeline
    • Save Time
  • LINDA VASU
  • MOODLE
    An ideal learning management system for the English classroom
  • Moodle fulfills multiple learning modalities
    • George Siemens at the University of Manitoba, Learning Technologies Centre
    • www.elearnspace.org
    • www.connectivism.ca
    • Knowing Knowledge, Handbook of Emerging Technologies for Learning, A Companion to Digital Humanities (2004),
    • eLearning is easily adaptable to literature courses because course content is relatively “stable.”
  • Moodle: an ideal Learning Management System for the English Classroom
  • Instructional Goals
    Rich contexts and resources
    Variety, choices and control
    Consistent workspace
    Opportunities for independent/collaborative work
    Practice in synthesizing multiple modes of information
    Student = primary contributor of his/her knowledge
    Teacher = a node in a network
  • Choices
    Students can enhance their understanding of the Vermeer painting in Girl in Hyacinth Blue with an online visit to the Vermeer exhibition.
  • Sample Activities
    Summer reading forum – online discussion
    Posting a response to the prompt
    Responding to a prompt
     
    Reading Journal: Online text discussion – Reading Log…hyperlink to the example
    Choosing and framing a prompt
    Using Word first
    Proofreading before posting
     
    Wordle: close reading and quotation analysis
  • Reading Journal Prompt
  • Entries
  • Wordle.net for textual analysis
  • TASK: Choose a significant quotation to analyze. Use Wordle to highlight key words.
  • Wordle: Focus on Language and Diction
  • www.NoodleBib.com
    Online Composing a bibliography
  • Moodle for Professional Development
  • Jason Ramsden
  • Web 2.0: The Challenge
  • Web 2.0: TheChallenge
  • DiscontinuousChange
  • Fairly Flat?
    2001 - Present
    Takes Off?
    Innovations in Education
    1900
    2000
  • Fairly Flat?
    Innovations in Education
    1900
    2000
  • Bloom’s Taxonomy
    1956
    http://www.officeport.com/edu/blooms.htm
  • Bloom’s Taxonomy Applied to Web 2.0
    2009
    http://visualblooms.wikispaces.com/
  • Bloom’s Taxonomy Applied to Web 2.0
    2009
    http://visualblooms.wikispaces.com/
  • Innovation without Risk?
  • Essential Questions
  • Am I able to teach critical thinking skills using Web 2.0 applications?
    ?
    Am I able to create resilient, flexible, and creative mindsets in my students using Web 2.0 applications?
    Am I able to use Web 2.0 applications to effectively address challenges in my classroom?
    What are the obstacles to Web 2.0 that exist in my school and how can I work to overcome them?