Career Ready, Seminar 5: Next steps after I graduate
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Career Ready, Seminar 5: Next steps after I graduate

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This final module is aimed at penultimate and final year students, who are interested in exploring ways to build, maintain and manage their career. It will review learning from previous modules and ...

This final module is aimed at penultimate and final year students, who are interested in exploring ways to build, maintain and manage their career. It will review learning from previous modules and consolidate these in order to assist you to develop a career readiness plan. You will be given introduction to the concept of resilience as it relates to career decision making and management. Professionalism in the workplace will also be explored in this module.

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  • Self awarenessIn Module 1 we explored career values and interests as well as career decision making. Take time now to review the values and interests you identified and remind yourself of your preferred decision making style.In Module 2 we looked at skills that employers look for in graduates. Take time to review your skills list – do you need to update this list? Consider which skills you need to continue to develop throughout the remainder of your time at university.The steps outlined above will help you to gain exposure to work related to your career goal. This may include a work placement, internship, part time position, graduate role or simply some job shadowing. Use this experience to further refine your career planning. Questions to ask yourself during and following your experience:How did the work relate to interests I have? Are there opportunities for my interests to be further developed through work in this field?How did the work and the environment relate to my stated career values? Has the experience confirmed my choice of career values or changed what is important to me?Which employability skills did I use during my work experience? Were these skills I enjoy using? Which skills would I need to further develop to be successful in a career in this field?How has this experience helped develop my networks? What steps do I need to take to build on this?How has this experience confirmed (or changed) the career decisions I have made so far?
  • Opportunity awareness In Module 1 you identified career options. Now is a good time to review the career opportunities you explored including your career research and occupations identified.
  • Review options and make choicesModule 1 gave an overview of how to explore career options in your area of interest. Review your research into career options and the choices you have already made. If you have not already done so, decide on one to three possible career options to focus on.Create an action planSee the section below on next steps – creating a career readiness action plan.Generate opportunities and make applicationsModule 3 outlined the various methods of sourcing career opportunities. Review the job search methods outlined and decide on a job search strategy. Don’t forget the importance of networking as a tool for sourcing opportunities. Have you developed your networks? How could these networks help you in your career planning? In Module 4 we looked at making applications for jobs and other opportunities. Review your application documents including your resume - are they ready to send to a contact or potential employer?
  • Specific – not vagueaction orientated – do something practicalMeasurable – how will youknow when you have accomplished it?Activity!- list 2-4 short term goals (2-3 months only)Fill in goal setting worksheet for at least 2Discuss with person next to you Take away and review in terms of your research / identified opportunitiesGoal setting resources: Mindtools goal setting resourceUniversity of California goal setting for careers
  • As a professional you will be expected to understand the culture of your workplace, including basic professional etiquette. Professionalism is not only a skills set in a given occupation; it is an ineffable something that the person exudes in manner, dress, speech and standards of practice that is palpably powerful: standards like honesty, due diligence, perseverance, willingness to listen and learn, creative thinking within a framework of training, and other qualities most people would be hard put to describe but which they expect in the professionals with whom they engage. Another word for these standards is “virtues” and the hard-to-describe something exuded is “trustworthiness”: the sum total of these virtues. (http://www.professions.com.au/Files/Professionalism_Beaton.pdf) Quote:-Start building your reputation as a professional from the moment you meet with potential employers-Make the most of the opportunities available to you to increase your employability skills and enhance your reputation-Be remembered for what you did, not what you wish you had done
  • Professionalism encompasses a number of different attributes, and, together, these attributes identify and define a professional.First and foremost, professionals are known for their specialized knowledge. They've made a deep personal commitment to develop and improve their skills, and, where appropriate, they have the degrees and certifications that serve as the foundation of this knowledge. They keep this knowledge up-to-date, so that they can continue to deliver the best work possible.Professionals get the job done. They're reliable, and they keep their promises. Professionals exhibit qualities such as honesty and integrity. They keep their word, and they can be trusted implicitly because of this. They never compromise their values, and will do the right thing, even when it means taking a harder road. More than this, true professionals are humble – if a project or job falls outside their scope of expertise, they're not afraid to admit this. They immediately ask for help when they need it, and they're willing to learn from others.Professionals hold themselves accountable for their thoughts, words, and actions, especially when they've made a mistake. They also stay professional under pressure. Genuine professionals show respect for the people around them, no matter what their role or situation. They exhibit a high degree of emotional intelligence (EI) by considering the emotions and needs of others, and they don't let a bad day impact how they interact with colleagues or clients. Professionals look the part – they don't show up to work sloppily dressed, with unkempt hair. They're polished, and they dress appropriately for the situation. Because if this, they exude an air of confidence, and they gain respect for this.Source: http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/professionalism.htm
  • Etiquette guidelines are important to show your manners and respect for others to ensure a harmonious workplace. While the accepted behaviour is different at different workplaces, there are some common practices which can be applied to most.Treat others how you want to be treated is never truer than in the workplace. Make sure you listen to others and value their opinion and, if they also follow office etiquette, they shall do the same for you. Teamwork requires you to be diplomatic. Learn co-workers’ names quickly. If you do forget a name, apologise and ask for it.Arrive on time for meetings and appointments -If you think you are going to be late, call and let your supervisor or other staff members know. It is poor etiquette to turn up late to anything, and in the office this can be a strong reflection on your work ethic. Synchronise your watch with the main clock in your office to ensure that you’re not turning up to work five minutes later than you think you are. And if unforeseeable circumstances mean you do happen to arrive late to work, show your good manners and stay back late to make it up.Keep your emails professional. The problem with email is that your tone can be easily misunderstood. Be concise and to the point.Use proper spelling, grammar, and punctuation (remove the lol’s, omg’s). Re‐read the email before you send it.Beware of office gossip – don’t believe everything you hear. Give yourself time to observe and learn how things really areDress appropriately - Err on the side of formal for your first day of work. Dress codes vary with the industry and business you are in and it’s best to scope out your colleagues’ attire so that you are appropriately dressed. Ensure that your clothes are clean and that your personal hygiene is professional.Demonstrate enthusiasm for learning - Listen carefully and have a pen and paper handy so you an make notes for future reference. No one expects you to know all the answers so don’t be scared to ask questions when you are uncertain - this will help to demonstrate your genuine interest in the job and the organisation, as well as your eagerness to learn. Don’t use profanity or slang, and be careful with humour and sarcasm. Demonstrate that you are mature and have good judgment. Loud people, loud music and loud ringtones can make working in an office unbearable. The more distracting you are, the more you are going to get on people’s nerves. Unnecessary interruptions can severely disturb one’s train of thought. Be careful that your voice is not an assault on your colleagues’ eardrums, especially in an open plan office. Turnyour phone off or on silent when you enter the building.
  • Etiquette guidelines are important to show your manners and respect for others to ensure a harmonious workplace. While the accepted behaviour is different at different workplaces, there are some common practices which can be applied to most.Treat others how you want to be treated is never truer than in the workplace. Make sure you listen to others and value their opinion and, if they also follow office etiquette, they shall do the same for you. Teamwork requires you to be diplomatic. Learn co-workers’ names quickly. If you do forget a name, apologise and ask for it.Arrive on time for meetings and appointments -If you think you are going to be late, call and let your supervisor or other staff members know. It is poor etiquette to turn up late to anything, and in the office this can be a strong reflection on your work ethic. Synchronise your watch with the main clock in your office to ensure that you’re not turning up to work five minutes later than you think you are. And if unforeseeable circumstances mean you do happen to arrive late to work, show your good manners and stay back late to make it up.Keep your emails professional. The problem with email is that your tone can be easily misunderstood. Be concise and to the point.Use proper spelling, grammar, and punctuation (remove the lol’s, omg’s). Re‐read the email before you send it.Beware of office gossip – don’t believe everything you hear. Give yourself time to observe and learn how things really areDress appropriately - Err on the side of formal for your first day of work. Dress codes vary with the industry and business you are in and it’s best to scope out your colleagues’ attire so that you are appropriately dressed. Ensure that your clothes are clean and that your personal hygiene is professional.Demonstrate enthusiasm for learning - Listen carefully and have a pen and paper handy so you an make notes for future reference. No one expects you to know all the answers so don’t be scared to ask questions when you are uncertain - this will help to demonstrate your genuine interest in the job and the organisation, as well as your eagerness to learn. Don’t use profanity or slang, and be careful with humour and sarcasm. Demonstrate that you are mature and have good judgment. Loud people, loud music and loud ringtones can make working in an office unbearable. The more distracting you are, the more you are going to get on people’s nerves. Unnecessary interruptions can severely disturb one’s train of thought. Be careful that your voice is not an assault on your colleagues’ eardrums, especially in an open plan office. Turnyour phone off or on silent when you enter the building.
  • Career Resilience can be considered as the ability to bounce back from change or to be able to ‘resume your original shape’ in spite of a setbackResilience can be one of the keys to successful career development. The ability to cope with the ups and downs in life is very important during the process of deciding on a career and finding fulfilling education, training and employment.A person’s resilience is believed to be linked in part to social and individual factors:supports within the surrounding environment, as well as development of various social and emotional competencies within the individual. Consider how you have demonstrated resilienceResilience in job seeking - e.g.se.g. Not giving up after 5 rejectionsTkaing feedback on board an doing something about itFinding another way into the job youwant – e.g. Intl student – accounting pharmacy – intl college - now super industry
  • Developing ResilienceThe good news is that even if you're not a naturally resilient person, you can learn to develop a resilient mindset and attitude. To do so, incorporate the following into your daily life:Get enough sleep and exercise, and learn to manage stress. When you take care of your mind and body, you're better able to cope effectively with challenges in your life.Practice thought awareness. Resilient people don't let negative thoughts derail their efforts. Instead, they consistently practice positive thinking. Also, "listen" to how you talk to yourself when something goes wrong - if you find yourself making statements that are permanent, pervasive or personalized, correct these thoughts in your mind.Practice Cognitive Restructuring to change the way that you think about negative situations and bad events.Every mistake has the power to teach you something important; so don't stop searching until you've found the lesson in every situation. Also, make sure that you understand the idea of "post-traumatic growth" - there can be real truth in the saying that "if it doesn't kill you, it makes you stronger."Remember, we all experience bad days and we all go through our share of crises. But we have a choice in how we respond. we can choose to react negatively or in a panic, or we can choose to remain calm and logical to find a solution. Your reaction is always up to you.Resilient people understand that, although a situation or crisis may seem overwhelming in the moment, it may not make that much of an impact over the long-term. If you don't already, learn to set SMART, effective personal goals.Build your self confidence. Remember, resilient people are confident that they're going to succeed eventually, despite the setbacks or stresses that they might be facing. This belief in themselves also enables them to take risks: when you develop confidence and a strong sense of self, you have the strength to keep moving forward, and to take the risks you need to get ahead.People who have strong connections at work are more resistant to stress, and they're happier in their role. This also goes for your personal life: the more real friendships you develop, the more resilient you're going to be, because you have a strong support network to fall back on.Resilient people understand that things change, and that carefully-made plans may, occasionally, need to be amended or scrapped. Source: http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/resilience.htm
  • Developing ResilienceThe good news is that even if you're not a naturally resilient person, you can learn to develop a resilient mindset and attitude. To do so, incorporate the following into your daily life:Get enough sleep and exercise, and learn to manage stress. When you take care of your mind and body, you're better able to cope effectively with challenges in your life.Practice thought awareness. Resilient people don't let negative thoughts derail their efforts. Instead, they consistently practice positive thinking. Also, "listen" to how you talk to yourself when something goes wrong - if you find yourself making statements that are permanent, pervasive or personalized, correct these thoughts in your mind.Practice Cognitive Restructuring to change the way that you think about negative situations and bad events.Every mistake has the power to teach you something important; so don't stop searching until you've found the lesson in every situation. Also, make sure that you understand the idea of "post-traumatic growth" - there can be real truth in the saying that "if it doesn't kill you, it makes you stronger."Remember, we all experience bad days and we all go through our share of crises. But we have a choice in how we respond. we can choose to react negatively or in a panic, or we can choose to remain calm and logical to find a solution. Your reaction is always up to you.Resilient people understand that, although a situation or crisis may seem overwhelming in the moment, it may not make that much of an impact over the long-term. If you don't already, learn to set SMART, effective personal goals.Build your self confidence. Remember, resilient people are confident that they're going to succeed eventually, despite the setbacks or stresses that they might be facing. This belief in themselves also enables them to take risks: when you develop confidence and a strong sense of self, you have the strength to keep moving forward, and to take the risks you need to get ahead.People who have strong connections at work are more resistant to stress, and they're happier in their role. This also goes for your personal life: the more real friendships you develop, the more resilient you're going to be, because you have a strong support network to fall back on.Resilient people understand that things change, and that carefully-made plans may, occasionally, need to be amended or scrapped. Source: http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/resilience.htm
  • Kathleen Mitchell & John Krumboltz incorporated ideas about dealing with uncertainty, and about seeing the potential benefits from unplanned events in their theory of ‘planned happenstance’. Planned happenstance provides a framework for accepting unplanned events as opportunities for development through experiencing new situations and circumstances. The goal for individuals is to generate positive & beneficial chance events, and have the skills to take advantage of them. These skills include:
  • Kathleen Mitchell & John Krumboltz incorporated ideas about dealing with uncertainty, and about seeing the potential benefits from unplanned events in their theory of ‘planned happenstance’. Planned happenstance provides a framework for accepting unplanned events as opportunities for development through experiencing new situations and circumstances. The goal for individuals is to generate positive & beneficial chance events, and have the skills to take advantage of them. These skills include:
  • Self-reflectionYou are most likely to learn from your first job if you spend time reflecting upon each aspect of it and think about how your behaviour and performance could be improvedOver time, self-reflection can help you to understand more about yourselfMake time to reflect on what is happening as the job progresses as personal reflection in real-time is the only way to maximise your learning opportunities

Career Ready, Seminar 5: Next steps after I graduate Career Ready, Seminar 5: Next steps after I graduate Presentation Transcript

  • Career Ready Program Seminar 5: Next Steps Career Development Centre La Trobe Universitylatrobe.edu.au/students/careers CRICOS Provider 00115M
  • Career Readiness Planning
  • Career Readiness Planning Self Awareness Gain Opportunity experience Awareness Make Review applications & options and generate make choices opportunities Create an action plan adapted from: /www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/careers/postgrad/phd/making-career-decisions/models 3 View slide
  • Self Awareness Module 1-2Reflect on your career exploration so far ...• Values• Interests• Decision making styleReview your employability skill development 4 View slide
  • Opportunity Awareness Module 3-4Review your career opportunities• Your career research• Occupations identified• Job search methods• Networks• Applying for opportunities 5
  • Next StepsConsolidating & taking actionWhat will your Career Readiness Plan include? • Skill development • Network development • Acting on opportunity Luck is a matter of preparation meeting opportunity. Seneca 6
  • Goal Setting – Some Considerations• Your environment is dynamic ... and so are you! complex, constantly changing, adapting See: Jim Bright; The Chaos Theory of Careers• Therefore: long term goal setting may be of limited benefit• You can really only plan for how you to be successful in this environment 7
  • Short-Term Goal Setting  specific  action orientated  measurable Activity! • Complete the Goal section of your Career Readiness Plan, recording 1-3 career goals • List 2-4 short term goals that you want to achieve in the next 6-12 months that support your career goals 8
  • Another way to set goals ...Career Bucket Lists• Using PebblePad you can create a „Career Bucket List‟ of the 10 things you want to experience in your career.• Get inspiration from Pinterest• Items could include; working overseas, becoming an expert in your field, speaking at a conference, changing attitudes to a social issue etc. 9
  • Professionalism in the Workplace
  • Professionalism“It takes 20 years to builda reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, youll do things differently.” Warren Buffett• Professionalism: “the conduct, aims, or qualities that characterize or mark a profession or a professional person” (Merriam Webster dictionary)• Adherence to professional etiquette and ethics• Related to the person rather than the position• Your level of professionalism can have a long lasting effect on your personal career development. 11
  • Professionalism in the WorkplaceCharacteristics of professionals:• Possess specialised knowledge• Competent• Act with integrity• Accountable• Calm under pressure• Dress appropriately for the situation www.mindtools.com 12
  • Building Your Professional Profile• Let people know who you are.• Let people know you‟re capable and interested.• Get involved and take advantage of opportunities.• Be a strong team player.• Volunteer to do extra tasks, projects or committee work (but volunteer wisely).• Find a mentor.• Network within and outside the organisation. 13
  • Professional Etiquette Tips• Make it your goal to work well with others.• Treat people at all levels with respect and dignity.• Arrive on time for meetings and appointments.• Show genuine appreciation for help.• Keep all promises and commitments.• Conduct personal business on your lunch breaks. 14
  • Professional Etiquette Tips (continued)• Avoid getting involved in office politics.• Try to return phone calls and emails within 24 hours.• Keep emails professional.• Avoid personal web surfing.• Dress appropriately for the workplace.• Demonstrate enthusiasm for learning.• Don‟t use profanity or slang. 15
  • Managing Your Career
  • Strategies for Managing Your Career• Develop professional workplace relationships• Seek feedback from others• Get a mentor (formal or informal)• Join and participate in a professional association• Undertake continuing professional development 17
  • Strategies for Managing Your Career (continued)• Use appropriate business etiquette• Learn how to network properly• Keep resume up to date• Be prepared to take risks and look for opportunities• Continue to be self aware – reflect on your unique skill set 18
  • Career Resilience “I didnt see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.[…] Sometimes life hits you in the head with a brick. Dont lose faith.” Steve Jobs, on his being fired from Apple in 1984
  • Resilience The ability to recover quickly from change or misfortune; buoyancy. www.thefreedictionary.com/resilience Career Resilience can be considered as the ability to bounce back from adversity, adapt to change or to be able to resume your career identity in spite of a career setback. 20
  • Strategies to develop resilience• Get enough sleep and exercise, and learn to manage stress.• Practice positive thinking.• Learn from your mistakes and failures.• Choose your response.• Maintain perspective and try to avoid blowing things out of proportion. 21
  • Strategies to develop resilience (continued)• Learn to set and achieve goals, and learn from your experiences.• Build your self confidence.• Take the risks you need to get ahead.• Develop strong relationships with your colleagues.• Focus on being flexible. 22
  • Building Career Resilience• Accept change as constant• Optimism – view challenges as opportunities• Focus on meaning and purpose• Take responsibility for your career• Develop emotional intelligence• Balance work and life goals 23
  • My career has not been linear, I have just made the bestdecision I could at the time” Tim Costello, World Vision 24
  • Planned Happenstance The theory of „planned happenstance‟ incorporates ideas about using skills to deal with uncertainty, and seeing the potential benefits from unplanned events. 25
  • Planned HappenstanceAttitudes helpful when dealing with uncertainty:• Curiosity Explore new learning opportunities• Persistence Exerting effort despite setbacks• Flexibility Changing attitudes and circumstances• Optimism Viewing opportunities as possible and attainable• Risk taking Taking action in the face of uncertain outcomes (Mitchell, Levin & Krumboltz 1999) 26
  • Making the most of opportunities 27
  • Next steps• LMS readings for module „Next steps after I graduate‟• Complete your PebblePad workbook activities• If you are a Work Ready BA or Science student: • Submit your completed PebblePad workbook to the „Career Ready Program 2013‟ workspace • We will notify your faculty that you have completed the program 28
  • Thank youConnect with us via:Web: latrobe.edu.au/students/careersFacebook: facebook.com/LaTrobeCareersTwitter: @LTUcareersEmail: careers@latrobe.edu.au