Hurricane Sandy and CommerciallyTested Fuel Cell Backup Power SolutionsWEBINARSponsored byMay 15, 2013Hosted byEric Denhof...
Housekeeping Items• Recording of Slides: A recording of this webinar and a link to the slides willbe sent via email to al...
Agenda• Backup Power: A Core Component of NetworkResilience• Kyla Reid, Head of the GSMA Disaster ResponseProgramme• Telec...
4Back-up Power: A CoreComponent of NetworkResilienceRestricted - Confidential Information © GSMA 20134
Role of the GSMA5WE ARE THE GLOBAL INDUSTRY VOICESHAPING THE FUTURE OF MOBILEINDUSTRYFORUMEnabling industrycollaborationan...
The Disaster Response ProgrammeSupporting the mobile industry in improving preparedness and response in crisis toensure th...
Natural Disasters 2012: 231 disasters, more than 87 million affectedSri Lanka: over 300,000affected by flooding andlandsli...
MOBILE HAS BECOME ABASIC HUMANITARIAN NEEDIN ITS OWN RIGHTRestricted - Confidential Information © GSMA 20138
Back up Power for Network Resilience:•Back-up power is a multi-dimensional challenge for mobile networks indisasters, howe...
Power failure as a key contributor to communicationfailure:•85% of communication breakdown during the Japanese triple disa...
When you restore themobile network, yourebuild the humannetworkRestricted - Confidential Information © GSMA 201311
Telecom Backup Power:Hurricane Sandy Case Study12
Precision Power and Air (Caribbean)• Established in 2000 in Trinidad & Tobago• Focus on providing power protection and pow...
Bahamas14
Bahamas• Population 347,176• Challenging geography Spread across 700 islands Many remote locations• Hot, tropical climat...
Bahamas Telecommunications Company• Sole mobile telecom operator in the Bahamas Over 300,000 connections Almost 90% pene...
Challenges with Incumbent BackupPower SolutionsBatteries Diesel Generators• Require large installations forlonger duration...
Fuel Cell Generator Solution• Benefits: Reliable, extended duration runtime(autonomous) Performs well in tropical climat...
Fuel Cell Generator DeploymentNew Providence19
Fuel Cell Generator Deployment cont.Great Abaco and Grand Bahama20
Operational Experience - Typical• Average site runtime of 4 – 5 hours per month Some sites could run 20 hours Some sites...
Hurricane Sandy• Hurricane Sandy hit the Bahamas on October 25,2012 Sustained winds up to 80 mph 6 – 12 inches of rainfa...
The Impact• Resulted in over 70 deaths inthe Caribbean 2 in the Bahamas• Flooding across the islands• Damage to buildings...
Run Time During Hurricane Sandy24Each fuel cell backup powersystem that was neededperformed 100% reliablyElectraGen™- ME H...
Operational Experience - Hurricane Sandy• 700 hours run time (total)• Range from 0 to 132 hours per site• Advanced deploym...
Summary• Fuel cell systems operated automatically and reliably as powerwas needed• 17 systems provided over 700 hours of b...
Q & AHosted byEric Denhoff - ModeratorCEO of Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel CellAssociationKyla ReidHead of GSMA Disaster Resp...
Thank you for participating.Sponsored byHosted by
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Back-up Webinar presentation 5-2013

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  • ERIC: Good day everyone and welcome to our webinar session “Hurricane Sandy and Commercially Tested Fuel Cell Backup Power Solutions”. My name is Eric Denhoff, President and CEO of the Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association or CHFCA. I will be acting as today’s moderator. CHFCA is hosting this event. And Ballard Power Systems is sponsoring this event.
  • ERIC: Before we start, let’s take a moment to ensure that everyone is familiar with the webinar control panel. You should see a control panel on your screen and you have the ability to minimize this panel by clicking on the red arrow button or red box in the upper left corner. You can expand the panel again by clicking the same button. Take a moment to try that, please. Just to cover off some housekeeping issues, a recording of this presentation and a link to the slides will be sent via email to all attendees following the webinar.   You also have the ability to submit questions at any time during the webinar by using the question screen located near the bottom of the control panel.   And any questions you want to submit following the webinar can be forwarded to us at the email address you see on this slide. We will ensure that the appropriate person responds.
  • ERIC: Now let’s get started… As you know, the Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association is sponsoring this webinar on what we believe to be a very timely and important topic. As we see more and more areas of the world effected by increasing numbers of natural disasters, the need for reliable backup power will only increase.   Our first presenter today is Kyla Reid, Head of the GSMA Disaster Response Programme. As Head of the Disaster Response Programme, Kyla is responsible for leading the mobile industry in improving resilience and engaging in coordination initiatives that most effectively support citizens and humanitarian organizations on the ground following a crisis. Kyla will discuss backup power as a core component for network resilience in disaster situations from the perspective of the GSMA and the work the Disaster Response Programme is doing.   Following Kyla, Lennox McCartney, President of Precision Power and Air Bahamas will be our next presenter. Lennox will discuss fuel cell power generation systems as a means of reliable, extended duration backup power and how the fuel cell systems installed in the Bahamas during Hurricane Sandy kept the network up and running when people needed it most. We will then open up the session to answer questions that have been submitted in text form during the webinar.  So with that, I will now turn the floor over to Kyla Reid of the GSMA Disaster Response Programme…
  • KYLA: Thank you Eric… Spend a few minutes to provide some context on why we at the GSMA believe global networks are increasingly important Discuss the role of backup power in providing network resilience
  • Speaking points Global trade association for mobile industry Here’s a snapshot of the GSMA’s reach around the world. In addition to our 800+ mobile operator members, our associate members include handset makers, software companies, equipment providers, internet companies, and media and entertainment organizations. The role of the GSMA is extremely important in this context, as we are uniquely able to coordinate a collective response to the challenges faced by our members, and to engage productively with national regulatory authorities as well as policymakers. Our work as the mobile industry association can be divided into four broad areas : a forum for industry, a market think tank, an advocate for the industry, and bringing the wider mobile ecosystem together at Mobile World Congress, Mobile Asia Expo and other conferences and events. Mobile for development – focus on providing services to populations living in emerging and developing markets
  • A brief intro to the GSMA DR programme why it came about what some of the over arching challenges facing MNOs are in crisis (including infrastructure/technical/power) how we work with the industry to address them
  • Context: disasters increasingly a reality of life around the world- increasing in frequency and magnitude, trends suggest this will continue. Often most vulnerable are most badly affected. New strategies being developed across the disaster response cycle, and many of these rely on new technology, including mobile Stats on mobile penetration/growth, - this means that increasingly, those impacted by disasters can access information, call for help, reconnect with their loved ones. One of the first thing that people grab in a disaster is their mobile phone- but for this technology to be a life saving tool, the network on which it runs must be resilience, robust and able to cope with the infrastructural, human resource, network management and coordination challenges that these situations present. Critical to the health of the mobile network in these types of scenarios is redundancy, autonomy and back up power.
  • Mobile networks increasingly depended upon and under pressure to perform as mobile is seen as a basic tool and connectivity as a basic need in humanitarian situations Examples from Hurricane Sandy, Japan triple-disaster, Argentina, Chile, Philippines- Humanitarian sector acknowledging dependence on mobile networks Communication increasingly being viewed as core part of aid and assistance
  • Power a key problem for mobile operators Interdependence with commercial power providers which are often impacted in large scale disasters Difficulties experienced in accessing fuel (not only quantities, but prioritisation of mobile network vis-à-vis other sectors, logistical and transport difficulties involved in getting fuel) Challenges with existing generators- location, land lord access issues, redundancy, vulnerability Regulations around length of autonomy vary, one hour redundancy? 24 hour redundancy? Cost vs impact, and anticipating natural disaster risk – need for long term sustainable solutions
  • Case studies: Japan, Haiti, New Zealand, Sandy, Chile, Argentina flooding- power failure was key in all experiences- Need for innovation solutions, new strategies, new technology, new partnerships to address this challenge - FCC Post-Sandy Field Hearings highlighted the challenges presented by power failure, including licensing issues with fuel providers, security (generators being stolen), transport of fuel across state boundaries and communications with commercial power providers
  • Disaster Response Programme born out of belief that when you restore the mobile network, you rebuild the human network Backup power core part of network preparedness and restoration Thank you ERIC: Thank you Kyla. Your presentation certainly highlights why communication networks are so important during crisis situations and the how power supply is one of the most critical components. Now let’s turn the floor over to Lennox McCartney of Precision Power and Air Bahamas…
  • Thank you Eric… Presentation will share experience with fuel cell generators in the Bahamas with the primary telecommunications supplier Focus on extreme weather situation during Hurricane Sandy
  • Primarily providing power protection and power continuity solutions Establishment of PP&A Bahamas in 2011 Responsibility of deploying fuel cell generators in the Bahamas
  • Geography of Bahamas to give presentation more context Island state 21 major populated islands Nassau capital and most populated island
  • Backup power provided using batteries, diesel generators and fuel cell generators Great need for remote servicing
  • Go through some challenges Most of mobile locations have batteries as primary backup Highlight challenges of batteries Highlight challenges of diesel gensets – example of reliability and pilferage issues
  • Reason for selection primarily reliability Extended runtime Easy to refuel – easily portable fuel; good for emergency situations Easy maintenance Cost effective
  • Nassau has largest population (250K out of 350K – 70%), although one of the smallest islands Initial deployment were at mobile /wireless locations Planned site and mostly wire locations. These locations have similar characteristics as the mobile locations. All Sites have commercial power with the primary backup power is batteries. Fuel Cell Generators provide long run backup power support
  • Abaco Island and Grand Bahama Islands are 20 to 30 min plane rides away from Nassau. Daily ferry service to/from islands from Nassau\\ BTC concentrated deployment efforts on higher populated areas
  • Typical operational experience – daily/monthly basis 4 – 5 hours runtime per month Extensive remote monitoring – able to do maintenance without site going offline
  • Look at experience in extreme weather conditions Not a major hurricane for the Bahamas – not a direct hit Affected Nassau, Abaco and Grand Bahama – Abaco and Grand Bahama mostly
  • Impact summary Commercial power outages lasted up to 3 days in some scenarios Damage to electrical infrastructure at base station sites caused power failures in excess of 5 days in some areas Nassau power outages lasted 24 – 48 hours
  • Runtime during hurricane sandy Showing spreadsheet of runtime of installed systems Some sites commercial power remained on throughout the hurricane Nassau – lower runtime for most units End of 48 hours most sites had power restored Long runtimes due to fact that after commercial power restored, damage to electrical infrastructure at the base station sites caused delay in getting powering Fuel cells maintained power – aware of situation through remote monitoring All systems that were needed ran as they were supposed to
  • Summary of overall operational experience during Hurricane Sandy
  • Fuel cell generator summary – highlights of performance in Hurricane Sandy Systems proved 100% reliable Future BTC deployment Thank you very much and I’ll be happy to answer any questions
  • ERIC: Thank you Lennox, that was a very informative presentation with some very helpful insights. You provided a lot of very detailed information both from an operational and a general perspective on the situation during Hurricane Sandy.   At this time we would like to address questions that we have received during the webinar. As a reminder, please send your questions in by using the question box located at the bottom of the control panel on your screen. We will try to answer as many as time will allow. If we don’t get to your question, then an appropriate individual will respond to you following the webinar. Q&A’s  ERIC TO READ QUESTIONS, THEN HAND-OFF Questions from control panel to be sent to core team by Julia & Guy If we need them, will have pre-planned questions available Pre-planned questions (if needed): Questions for Eric: This webinar focuses on one specific fuel cell system deployment for telecom backup power – are you seeing interest in this application as a general trend in the industry? Are there particular regions where you’re seeing telecom deployments? … where fuel cell applications are particularly well suited for telecom?   Questions for Kyla: Do you see telecom operators addressing this issue independently or does there need to be regulations in place around backup power? Does GSMA see this happening in the short- or medium-term in specific jurisdictions? Are any jurisdictions dealing particularly well with this issue today?   Questions for Lennox: How did the fuel cell systems’ performance differ from other backup power solutions in previous hurricane situations? Can you outline the main differences between fuel cell systems and diesel generators? … and battery solutions? How does the installation process differ for a fuel cell generator as compared to a diesel generator? …what challenges do fuel cell installations present?
  • ERIC: That’s all the time we have today. I would like to thank you all for joining us on the webinar today … and, a special thank you to our presenters– Kyla Reid and Lennox McCartney – and also to our colleagues at Ballard Power Systems for sponsoring this event. ** mention of HFC event and CommunicAsia, both CHFCA and Ballard participating** We hope you received value for the time you invested today. Thanks again … and good-bye.
  • Back-up Webinar presentation 5-2013

    1. 1. Hurricane Sandy and CommerciallyTested Fuel Cell Backup Power SolutionsWEBINARSponsored byMay 15, 2013Hosted byEric Denhoff, CEO
    2. 2. Housekeeping Items• Recording of Slides: A recording of this webinar and a link to the slides willbe sent via email to all attendees following the event• Submit Questions During the Webinar: Use the question box on your screen• Additional Questions After the Webinar: julia.grant@ballard.com2
    3. 3. Agenda• Backup Power: A Core Component of NetworkResilience• Kyla Reid, Head of the GSMA Disaster ResponseProgramme• Telecom Backup Power: Hurricane Sandy Case Study• Lennox McCartney, President of Precision Power andAir Bahamas• Q & A3
    4. 4. 4Back-up Power: A CoreComponent of NetworkResilienceRestricted - Confidential Information © GSMA 20134
    5. 5. Role of the GSMA5WE ARE THE GLOBAL INDUSTRY VOICESHAPING THE FUTURE OF MOBILEINDUSTRYFORUMEnabling industrycollaborationand consensusPOLICYADVOCATEPromoting policiesthat foster growthand investmentMARKETTHINK TANKDelivering insight andanalysis from globalindustry dataBUSINESSCATALYSTServing the globalmobile ecosystemthrough events such asMobile WorldCongressRestricted - Confidential Information © GSMA 2013
    6. 6. The Disaster Response ProgrammeSupporting the mobile industry in improving preparedness and response in crisis toensure that life saving communications are as robust as possibleAreas of Focus:•Technical: infrastructure preparedness, technical resilience and restorationstrategies, disaster-appropriate solutions•Coordination: improved coordination within the industry and between MNOs andhumanitarian and emergency response stakeholders•Regulatory: Prioritising mobile as basic emergency infrastructure and supporting anenabling regulatory environmentResearch and knowledge Sharing:Case Studies capturing industry lessons and best practicesSeminar Series – knowledge transfer and expert guidance on disaster-specific risks,challenges and solutionsEngagement guidelines and educational seminars for the mobile industry and itspartnersPrimary researchAdvocacyRestricted - Confidential Information © GSMA 20136
    7. 7. Natural Disasters 2012: 231 disasters, more than 87 million affectedSri Lanka: over 300,000affected by flooding andlandslides in DecemberNigeria: Floodingdisplaces over twomillionHurricane Sandyeconomic toll ~$50billionNatural Disasters CostLatin America~$2Billion /yearTyphoon Bopha: 6.2million people affected,~230,000 homesdestroyedRestricted - Confidential Information © GSMA 20137
    8. 8. MOBILE HAS BECOME ABASIC HUMANITARIAN NEEDIN ITS OWN RIGHTRestricted - Confidential Information © GSMA 20138
    9. 9. Back up Power for Network Resilience:•Back-up power is a multi-dimensional challenge for mobile networks indisasters, however it also needs to be viewed as a priority for improvingresilienceChallenges Include:•Interdependency with commercial power•Flooding/damaged equipment•Generator placement & access•Back-up fuel positioning/availability, logistics and transport, distribution•Establishing the appropriate level of autonomy and redundancy•Identifying the most appropriate sources of back-up power•Broader preparedness/education/awarenessRestricted - Confidential Information © GSMA 20139
    10. 10. Power failure as a key contributor to communicationfailure:•85% of communication breakdown during the Japanese triple disasterattributed to power outages•In Haiti, approx. 16% of BTS impacted by the earthquake; over a day later,~86% impacted due to power failures•Regulatory pressure increasing in LatAm region to ensure sufficient backuppower available to support 24 hour autonomy of BTS•Coordination challenges with commercial power providers, flooding andaccess significantly contributed to communications challenges duringHurricane Sandy•FCC Post-Sandy Field Hearings also highlighted the challenges presented bypower failure, including licensing issues, security andtransport of fuelRestricted - Confidential Information © GSMA 201310
    11. 11. When you restore themobile network, yourebuild the humannetworkRestricted - Confidential Information © GSMA 201311
    12. 12. Telecom Backup Power:Hurricane Sandy Case Study12
    13. 13. Precision Power and Air (Caribbean)• Established in 2000 in Trinidad & Tobago• Focus on providing power protection and powercontinuity solutions• Working with major telecom operators across theCaribbean – Digicel, LIME• Precision Power and Air (Bahamas) established in201113
    14. 14. Bahamas14
    15. 15. Bahamas• Population 347,176• Challenging geography Spread across 700 islands Many remote locations• Hot, tropical climate• Susceptible to tropical storms andhurricanes• Regular grid outages• Major Telecom Operator Bahamas TelecommunicationCompany (BTC)© Bahamas Government15
    16. 16. Bahamas Telecommunications Company• Sole mobile telecom operator in the Bahamas Over 300,000 connections Almost 90% penetration• Current mobile network includes 240 base stationson 17 islands• Remote servicing required for majority of basestation locations16
    17. 17. Challenges with Incumbent BackupPower SolutionsBatteries Diesel Generators• Require large installations forlonger durations Large, heavy footprint Relatively expensive• Lifetime reduced in hot climate More frequent replacement• Maintenance needs challengingwith remote locations• Reliability concerns• Require frequent maintenance Challenge with remotelocations• Issues with diesel pilferage• Noise and emissions an issue incentral locations17
    18. 18. Fuel Cell Generator Solution• Benefits: Reliable, extended duration runtime(autonomous) Performs well in tropical climate Ease of refueling Methanol water solution (HydroPlus™) Easily portable Eliminates diesel pilferage issues Minimal maintenance Cost effective1818• BTC selected Ballard Power Systems’ 5kW ElectraGen™-ME (methanol-fuelled) fuel cell systemElectraGen™- ME system installedDelivering HydroPlus™fuel
    19. 19. Fuel Cell Generator DeploymentNew Providence19
    20. 20. Fuel Cell Generator Deployment cont.Great Abaco and Grand Bahama20
    21. 21. Operational Experience - Typical• Average site runtime of 4 – 5 hours per month Some sites could run 20 hours Some sites could run for 4 hours in a day All due to unplanned commercial power loss• Quarterly site visits for routine maintenance• Quarterly fuel top up21
    22. 22. Hurricane Sandy• Hurricane Sandy hit the Bahamas on October 25,2012 Sustained winds up to 80 mph 6 – 12 inches of rainfall Storm surge 5 – 8 feet above normal ocean levels22
    23. 23. The Impact• Resulted in over 70 deaths inthe Caribbean 2 in the Bahamas• Flooding across the islands• Damage to buildings, roads,docks and the airport• Damage to grid and basestation electrical infrastructurecaused power failures inexcess of 5 days in some areas23
    24. 24. Run Time During Hurricane Sandy24Each fuel cell backup powersystem that was neededperformed 100% reliablyElectraGen™- ME Hurricane “Sandy”System Locations October 25th– 31th(Hours)Abaco 132.15Nassau 118.33Abaco 94.96Nassau 81.34Grand Bahama 61.4Grand Bahama 46.4Nassau 45.11Grand Bahama 34.69Nassau 15.55Nassau 14.81Nassau 14.43Nassau 13.61Nassau 13.51Nassau 8.1Nassau 7.58Nassau 6.47Nassau 0.09Nassau 0Nassau 0Nassau 0Nassau 0Total Hours 708.53
    25. 25. Operational Experience - Hurricane Sandy• 700 hours run time (total)• Range from 0 to 132 hours per site• Advanced deployment of fuel to remote islands and locations• Top up refueling prior to estimated arrival of storm• 7 out of 21 systems required re-fuelling before commercial powerrestored• Typical run-times of 3 days before refueling required• Some locations were not accessible after storm due to flooding and roadand airport closures• A few locations remained running after commercial power restoredgenerally due to physical damage of commercial power infrastructure atlocal site• All sites monitored via GSM and GPRS communications25
    26. 26. Summary• Fuel cell systems operated automatically and reliably as powerwas needed• 17 systems provided over 700 hours of backup power over a 7day period during and after the storm• Produced more than 1,200 kilowatt-hours of electricity• Prevented a potential 50% loss of cell service according to BTC• Following their Hurricane Sandy experience, BTC is installing anadditional 16 fuel cell backup power systems2626
    27. 27. Q & AHosted byEric Denhoff - ModeratorCEO of Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel CellAssociationKyla ReidHead of GSMA Disaster Response ProgrammeLennox McCartneyPresident, Precision Power and Air BahamasSponsored byHosted by
    28. 28. Thank you for participating.Sponsored byHosted by

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