Workshop 3:
Managing and sharing information
Hello again!
#SADLw3
Student Ambassador role
• How did sharing exercise go?
– Did you share anything?
– If so, what?
– How did you bring it up?...
Student Ambassador role
• What is a student ambassador for digital literacy?
– Is the role clear to you?
– What support do...
Activity: which animal are you?
Information behaviour
• Discuss in pairs how you approach information
• Which animal are y...
Which animal are you?
A. Magpie
B. Cuckoo
C. Ostrich
D. Squirrel
E. Vulture
F. Giant Panda
G. Giant Anteater
H. Orb weaver...
Which animal are you
• What does this mean for students?
• How useful an exercise is this for students?
– What does it rev...
Today: managing and sharing
information
• Keeping up to date
• Managing (organising information)
• Using (quoting, citing)...
Activity: discussion
How do you…
• Get alerts for new information
• Manage or organise your information
• Store or archive...
Feedback to group?
How we do it
Activity: my favourite tool
• Name a tool you use to keep track of things
– What you use?
– How you use it?
– Why you use ...
• Add your tool on the sharing wall:
http://padlet.com/wall/skiqgvguf4
• Or write it on a post-it to share with group
Our favourite tools
• Evernote
• Mendeley
• Delicious
• Dropbox/ Google Drive
• Flipboard/RSS
Evernote
• Incorporate images, audio, video and URLs
into your notes
• Create checklists to help prioritise tasks
• Automa...
Social Bookmarking, e.g. Diigo,
Delicious
• Access your weblinks from any computer
• Organise bookmarks using tags and the...
Dropbox and Google Drive
• Store and access your files whenever and
wherever
• Easy to set up and use.
• Change a file in ...
RSS feeds, e.g. Flipboard, Feedly
• Easy to set up and easy to add new feeds to
the reader
• The information comes to you
...
Mendeley
• Easy to set up and start using
• Access whenever and wherever and syncing
simple
• Easy to add references + doc...
Let’s find out how much you
know about citing, referencing
and plagiarism!!
Is it plagiarism if you…
Copy a paragraph from a
text and put it in your
essay without putting it
in quotation marks and
r...
Is it plagiarism?
A. Yes
B. No
C. Unsure
Yes
No
Unsure
33% 33%33%
Is it plagiarism if you…
Copy a paragraph from a
text and put it in your
essay without putting it
in quotation marks and
r...
Is it plagiarism if you…
Include some paragraphs
from a previous submitted
essay that you have
written into the one you
ar...
Is it plagiarism?
A. Yes
B. No
C. Unsure
Yes
No
Unsure
33% 33%33%
Is it plagiarism if you…
Include some paragraphs
from a previous submitted
essay that you have
written into the one you
ar...
Is it plagiarism if you…
Incorporate text from
another source,
changing one or two
words and providing a
citation?
Is it plagiarism?
A. Yes
B. No
C. Unsure
Yes
No
Unsure
33% 33%33%
Is it plagiarism if you…
Incorporate text from
another source,
changing one or two
words and providing a
citation?
If you ...
Is it plagiarism if you…
Copy a diagram or data
table from a website,
providing a reference for
the source underneath?
Is it plagiarism?
A. Yes
B. No
C. Unsure
Yes
No
Unsure
33% 33%33%
Is it plagiarism if you…
Copy a diagram or data
table from a website,
providing a reference for
the source underneath?
Thi...
Is it plagiarism if you…
Talk about the ideas of
another author, written in
your own words and
without referring to the
or...
Is it plagiarism?
A. Yes
B. No
C. Unsure
Yes
No
Unsure
33% 33%33%
Is it plagiarism if you…
Talk about the ideas of
another author, written in
your own words and
without referring to the
or...
What is plagiarism?
• Cutting and pasting from other documents.
• Quoting without quotation marks or references.
• Paraphr...
Why do we need to
cite?
 To acknowledge the work of other writers
 To demonstrate the body of knowledge on which you hav...
Academic writing is
about …
• Posing a question, dilemma, debate that has not been
posed in quite the same way before …
• ...
Wrap up and feedback
• Between now and the final session, please
review Topic 5 of the Library Companion for
Students in M...
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LSE SADL Workshop 3

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This workshop explored how students currently store, share and use information that they find for their studies. We'll discuss ideas our 'information behaviour' and look at some tools that can help, depending on our ways of working. The team will share their favourite tools and there will be a chance for the ambassadors to share ideas with each other using an online wall. We'll finally think about academic integrity - sharing is important but students must be mindful of plagiarism.

Activities:

- Review of the student ambassadors role and sharing activities
- Information behaviour activity and current techniques for managing, storing, citing information
- Review of tools that can help
- What is plagiarism - a quiz!

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  •  
  • 2 mins to write stuff on post-its in pairs/groups
  • Continuing talking about searching – fun and tells you about your work
  • In groups – you can draw what you do as wellHighlight any
  • Jane uses a variety of tools to help her save and organise things she finds online. It depends on What she finds (is it a web link, a reference, a blog)What she wants to do with it – remember it, cite it, share it with others or read later offlineSome of the tools she uses include: Diigo (a social bookmarking site)Pocket (a bookmarking tool that allows you to read off line so great for the ipad)Mendeley – which is for collecting references and allows you to create a bibliography, but also store the filesFeedly – for reading blogs and keeping up to dateTwitter / Facebook – to share stuff with friends and colleagues
  • Not stipulating whether it’s work or life
  • You can incorporate images, audio, video and URLs to your notes to give notes more context.You can create checklists to sort out your activities and priorities, making Evernote useful for personal and academic use.Evernote automatically archives your notes and has a search function, making it easier to search through your notes for key concepts than having to look through notebooks.You can share notes via email, Twitter, messaging and even send important emails to your Evernote account, so that you can search for them through Evernote, rather than through constantly changing email accounts. You can also add reminder notes through Evernote to remind you to take action for certain emails.Access across platforms – you can use Evernote on laptops, smartphones and tablets, and access notes you’ve made on any of these devices on all of them by syncing your notes to your Evernote account.
  • You can access your weblinks from any computer – they are stored online not on computer or in a browserYou can organise your bookmarks using tags and they are searchable - no folders where the weblinks get lostYou can add notes to web pages you bookmark (these appear on screen in Diigo)You can share some / all of your bookmarks You can see popular web links people are bookmarking and through tagging see weblinks on topics that interest you
  • Dropbox and Google Drive let you store and access your files anywhere and whenever, from your computers, phones, or tablets.They’re easy to set up and use.You can change a file on the web, on your computer, or on your mobile device and it updates on every device where you’ve installed Google Drive. In Dropbox you can also edit documents, automatically add photos and show videos.You can share, collaborate, or work alone.You can store the first 15 GBs for free across Google Drive, Gmail, and Google+ Photos. Dropbox offers 2 GBs of free space with the potential to earn more.
  • RSS feed readers including Flipboard are easy to set up. It is then very easy to add new feeds to the reader, particularly in the case of Flipboard.The information comes to you rather than you having to check lots of sites meaning that they are great for sites/information that is updated oftenIt is designed for use on tablets and phones and there is an app available for iPad, iPhone, Android, Kindle Fire & NOOK. Flipboard (and some other RSS readers) have a great display and are very attractive to read – like a magazineGood for reading on the go – can download some stories and then read them wherever (e.g. on the tube)
  • Easy to set up and start usingAccess anywhere + desktop version on multiple PCs/laptops and syncing simpleEasy to add references + documents: pdfs / journal resources/ form the web as you research Sharing readings between colleagues working with youInserting citations as you write DEMO
  • Why you might use Mendeley is to help you demonstrate good practice in academic writing.What to include about this?Is it plagiarism if i… questions?Academic writing is about Common knowledgeReferencing – method and style?Google and summon cite buttons (although did we already show this?)?academic integrity is demonstrating good companion
  • LSE SADL Workshop 3

    1. 1. Workshop 3: Managing and sharing information
    2. 2. Hello again! #SADLw3
    3. 3. Student Ambassador role • How did sharing exercise go? – Did you share anything? – If so, what? – How did you bring it up? – If not, what stopped you? • Discuss with person next to them and then share with class
    4. 4. Student Ambassador role • What is a student ambassador for digital literacy? – Is the role clear to you? – What support do you need? – How can you support fellow students? – How much time should it take? – What might be the benefits and challenges? – Are the workshops enough? The right content?
    5. 5. Activity: which animal are you? Information behaviour • Discuss in pairs how you approach information • Which animal are you?
    6. 6. Which animal are you? A. Magpie B. Cuckoo C. Ostrich D. Squirrel E. Vulture F. Giant Panda G. Giant Anteater H. Orb weaver spider M agpie Cuckoo Ostrich Squirrel Vulture GiantPanda GiantAnteater Orb w eaverspider 13% 13% 13% 13%13%13%13%13%
    7. 7. Which animal are you • What does this mean for students? • How useful an exercise is this for students? – What does it reveal to you? – Would this affect how you study?
    8. 8. Today: managing and sharing information • Keeping up to date • Managing (organising information) • Using (quoting, citing) • And sharing (if you want!) …
    9. 9. Activity: discussion How do you… • Get alerts for new information • Manage or organise your information • Store or archive your information • Cite your information
    10. 10. Feedback to group?
    11. 11. How we do it
    12. 12. Activity: my favourite tool • Name a tool you use to keep track of things – What you use? – How you use it? – Why you use it?
    13. 13. • Add your tool on the sharing wall: http://padlet.com/wall/skiqgvguf4 • Or write it on a post-it to share with group
    14. 14. Our favourite tools • Evernote • Mendeley • Delicious • Dropbox/ Google Drive • Flipboard/RSS
    15. 15. Evernote • Incorporate images, audio, video and URLs into your notes • Create checklists to help prioritise tasks • Automatically archive your notes and make them searchable • Share notes via email, Twitter and messaging • Access across platforms
    16. 16. Social Bookmarking, e.g. Diigo, Delicious • Access your weblinks from any computer • Organise bookmarks using tags and they are searchable • Add notes to web pages you bookmark • Share some / all of your bookmarks • See popular web links people are bookmarking and tagging
    17. 17. Dropbox and Google Drive • Store and access your files whenever and wherever • Easy to set up and use. • Change a file in own place, on one device and all will update. • You can share, collaborate, or work alone. • Free up to a certain size
    18. 18. RSS feeds, e.g. Flipboard, Feedly • Easy to set up and easy to add new feeds to the reader • The information comes to you • Access across platforms • Flipboard very attractive to read • Good for reading on the go
    19. 19. Mendeley • Easy to set up and start using • Access whenever and wherever and syncing simple • Easy to add references + documents • Sharing readings between colleagues working with you • Inserting citations as you write
    20. 20. Let’s find out how much you know about citing, referencing and plagiarism!!
    21. 21. Is it plagiarism if you… Copy a paragraph from a text and put it in your essay without putting it in quotation marks and referencing the source?
    22. 22. Is it plagiarism? A. Yes B. No C. Unsure Yes No Unsure 33% 33%33%
    23. 23. Is it plagiarism if you… Copy a paragraph from a text and put it in your essay without putting it in quotation marks and referencing the source? This is probably the most well known example of plagiarism. If you copy exact words, you must enclose them in quotation marks and acknowledge your source in your bibliography.
    24. 24. Is it plagiarism if you… Include some paragraphs from a previous submitted essay that you have written into the one you are currently submitting?
    25. 25. Is it plagiarism? A. Yes B. No C. Unsure Yes No Unsure 33% 33%33%
    26. 26. Is it plagiarism if you… Include some paragraphs from a previous submitted essay that you have written into the one you are currently submitting? There is such a thing as self-plagiarism. Using your previous work in your current work is actually plagiarism and is not permitted.
    27. 27. Is it plagiarism if you… Incorporate text from another source, changing one or two words and providing a citation?
    28. 28. Is it plagiarism? A. Yes B. No C. Unsure Yes No Unsure 33% 33%33%
    29. 29. Is it plagiarism if you… Incorporate text from another source, changing one or two words and providing a citation? If you do not intend to quote directly from the source, you must write about it in your own words. Using too many words from the original source is plagiarism, even if you provide a reference.
    30. 30. Is it plagiarism if you… Copy a diagram or data table from a website, providing a reference for the source underneath?
    31. 31. Is it plagiarism? A. Yes B. No C. Unsure Yes No Unsure 33% 33%33%
    32. 32. Is it plagiarism if you… Copy a diagram or data table from a website, providing a reference for the source underneath? This isn’t plagiarism. You can include tables, diagrams or images from another source as long as you provide a reference.
    33. 33. Is it plagiarism if you… Talk about the ideas of another author, written in your own words and without referring to the original author? Adaptedfrom“Isitplagiarismquiz”(https://ilrb.cf.ac.uk/plagiarism)
    34. 34. Is it plagiarism? A. Yes B. No C. Unsure Yes No Unsure 33% 33%33%
    35. 35. Is it plagiarism if you… Talk about the ideas of another author, written in your own words and without referring to the original author? Even if you haven’t directly copied their words, you must provide a reference when talking about their ideas. Adaptedfrom“Isitplagiarismquiz”(https://ilrb.cf.ac.uk/plagiarism)
    36. 36. What is plagiarism? • Cutting and pasting from other documents. • Quoting without quotation marks or references. • Paraphrasing without referencing. • Summarising without referencing. • Using an image, source and/or diagram without referencing. • Taking another student’s ideas and passing them off as your own. • Re-cycling your own work which has been submitted for assessment elsewhere. • Collaborating on what should be individual work. • Translating a document from another language.
    37. 37. Why do we need to cite?  To acknowledge the work of other writers  To demonstrate the body of knowledge on which you have based your work  To enable other researchers to trace your sources and lead them on to further information  A standard system of citing ensures an easier system of tracing knowledge more efficiently  If you cite correctly, you don’t need to worry about plagiarism  You are upholding and contributing to academic standards and integrity
    38. 38. Academic writing is about … • Posing a question, dilemma, debate that has not been posed in quite the same way before … • Answering that question, with an answer that has not been constructed in quite the same way before … • Bringing together your ideas with those of others, making connections between things that have not been connected in quite that way before … • Using the work/ideas of others is a crucial element, but must be appropriately acknowledged. LSE Teaching and Learning Centre
    39. 39. Wrap up and feedback • Between now and the final session, please review Topic 5 of the Library Companion for Students in Moodle and send us any feedback • See you at the final workshop in Summer Term • Continue using the Sharing Wall: http://padlet.com/wall/skiqgvguf4

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