Teacher Burnout powerpoint

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An analyis of a Special Education Issue. Teacher Burnout. What are the causes and suggested solutions.

An analyis of a Special Education Issue. Teacher Burnout. What are the causes and suggested solutions.

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  • 1. TEACHER BURNOUTANALYSIS OF A SPECIAL EDUCATION ISSUE By: Lenora Butler Walden University Dr. Tontaleya Ivory
  • 2. Fourteen percent ofAmerican teachers leaveafter only one year, andforty-six percent quitbefore their fifth year.
  • 3. Teachers deal withtheir challenges andstresses in many ways.
  • 4. Some teachers areunable to manage theirworkload while othersare discouraged andbecome bitter.
  • 5. Many teachers findways to disassociatethemselves against ahostile schoolenvironment.
  • 6. DEFINITION OF TEACHER BURNOUTFreudeinberger (1974) identifiedburnout as a form of occupational stressthat is an inevitable struggle for allhelping professionals who work withothers, no matter how dedicated,committed, and skillful they may be.
  • 7. Students exhibit high instances of Students lack poor interest in behaviors schoolPoor School Ethos CAUSES OF BURNOUT Overwhelmed Poor relationships among colleagues by Heavy workloads
  • 8. SYMPTOMS OF TEACHER BURNOUT1. Teachers are reluctant to discuss their work with others.2. Teachers exhibit attitudes of cynicism, negativity, and callousness toward the students, parents, and colleagues.3. When teachers lack the enthusiasm and experience emotional exhaustion.4. Demonstrate decreased effectiveness in their job performance and feel powerless to alter their situation.
  • 9. SUGGESTIONS TO REDUCE BURNOUT1. SMALLER CLASS SIZES2. REDUCTION IN PAPERWORK3. MORE SUPPORT AND INTERACTION FROM COLLEAGUES, ADMINISTRATORS, AND COORDINATORS4. OBSERVATION OF COLLEAGUES FOR DEVELOPMENT AND COLLABORATION PURPOSES5. PLANNING PERIODS6. MENTOR PROGRAMS7. WORKSHOPS DESIGNED FOR DEALING WITH STRESS8. DEVELOPMENT OF CLEAR JOB DESCRIPTION9. PROPER PLACEMENT OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
  • 10. REDUCE YOUR WORKLOADFIGURE OUT WHAT THEMOST STRESSFUL PARTS OFYOUR TEACHING LIFE ARE,AND FIND SOLUTIONS
  • 11. RECHARGEEAT PROPERLYEXERCISERELAXSLEEPHAVE SOME “ME TIME”
  • 12. RECONNECT1. BUILD A PROFESSIONAL SUPPORT NETWORK2. ATTEND CONFERENCES3. BLOG4. TAKE CLASSES
  • 13. PROMISING SCHOOL PRACTICES AT THE DISTRICT, SCHOOL, AND CLASSROOM LEVELS, EDUCATORS SHOULD REVIEW PRACTICES THAT ARE NOT WORKING TO ADDRESS ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOR AND ACADEMIC PROBLEMS AND ELIMINATE OR MODIFY THESE PRACTICES.SCHOOLS SHOULD ESTABLISH APPROPRIATE ASSESSMENT PRACTICES FORALL STUDENTS DIRECTED TOWARD EARLY IDENTIFICATION OF PROBLEMBEHAVIORS AND ACADEMIC SKILL NEEDS. EARLY IDENTIFICATION ISESSENTIAL TO DESIGNING EFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS.DEVELOP A SCHOOL-WIDE APPROACH TO MODIFYING THE LEARNINGCLIMATE IN ACCORD WITH RESEARCH ON EFFECTIVE SCHOOLS.EMPHASIZE STAFF DEVELOPMENT AS ONE OF THE TOP SCHOOL PRIORITIES,AND ALIGN STAFF DEVELOPMENT TO BUILDING GOALS AND PROGRAMS.ONGOING STAFF DEVELOPMENT IS ESSENTIAL IF PROGRAMS TO REDUCEANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOR AND IMPROVE ACADEMIC SUCCESS ARE TO BEEFFECTIVE.
  • 14. ReferencesCarter, S. (1994). Organizing systems to support competent social behavior in children andyouth. Retrieved from: http; // www.interact.uoregon.edu/wrrc/burnout.htmlFreudeinberger, H. (1974). Staff burnout. Journal of Social Issues, 30, 159-165.Kyriakou, C. (2001) Teacher stress: directions for future research. EducationalReview, 53, 1, 27–35.Lambert, L. (2006, May 9). Half of teachers quit in 5 years. Washington Post.Retrieved from http://www.washingtonpost.comMaslach, C. & Jackson, S. (1981) The Maslach burnout inventory. Palo Alto,CA: Consulting Psychologists’ Press. Travers, C. & Cooper, C. (1996) Teachers under pressure: Stress in the teaching profession. London: Routledge.