MOOCs
Lessons
Learned
Bryan Ryan
SVP, Curriculum Education Services
Laura Kalbaugh
Dean, Academic Success and
Transition R...
“Early” “typical” MOOCs
• Massive Open Online Courses
• First offered by elite universities
• Advanced topics for well-pre...
Promise of MOOCs
• Next generation open door
• Individualized just-in-time approach
• Hybrid course facilitation
—Photo by...
Why Developmental Education?
• High need (massive)
• High access (open)
• Completion by Design target population
• NC Deve...
Wake Tech’s MOOC
• Targets students entering college
• Addresses placement issues
• Begins with the largest developmental ...
Wake Tech / Udacity PartnershipWake Tech / Udacity Partnership
“How the Brain Learns”
“What surprised me was
the way the class was
taught. It was designed
according to how the brain
act...
Developing theDeveloping the
MOOCMOOC
• Content specialists identifiedContent specialists identified
• Partnerships/proced...
How will Wake Tech’s MOOC be used?
• To prepare incoming students for placement or challenge tests
• To justify student pl...
MOOC DemoMOOC Demo
Who is Taking the MOOC and Why?
6,086 students were registered as of August 8, 2013
336 student earned a certificate of co...
Did Students Meet Their Goals?
6,086 students were registered as of August 8, 2013
336 student earned a certificate of com...
Quality Matters Review
While the course did not earn the QM certification, here are some reviewer comments:
“… While the c...
Quality Matters Review
More nice comments ….
“I love the format of the course! The presentation is clean, consistent and v...
What’s next for
MOOCs at Wake
Tech?
Computer literacy
Pre-college Chemistry
MOOCs Lessons Learned   NC3ADL
MOOCs Lessons Learned   NC3ADL
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MOOCs Lessons Learned NC3ADL

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Wake Tech's Introductory Algebra Review MOOC was launched May 1, 2013, and currently has over 8,000 students enrolled. This presentation details the details of creating the MOOC and shares some data about who is taking it and why.

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  • Developmental Education as you’ve never known it.
  • Similar interest in student success in gateway courses Similar belief in value of highly interactive instruction for developmental students
  • MOOCs Lessons Learned NC3ADL

    1. 1. MOOCs Lessons Learned Bryan Ryan SVP, Curriculum Education Services Laura Kalbaugh Dean, Academic Success and Transition Resources —Photo by robin.elaine
    2. 2. “Early” “typical” MOOCs • Massive Open Online Courses • First offered by elite universities • Advanced topics for well-prepared students • Leaned heavily on videotaped lectures • Some interaction with graduate assistants • Thousands enrolled in single course • Students benefit through knowledge and skills, not credit —Photo by markandlaura
    3. 3. Promise of MOOCs • Next generation open door • Individualized just-in-time approach • Hybrid course facilitation —Photo by tompagenet
    4. 4. Why Developmental Education? • High need (massive) • High access (open) • Completion by Design target population • NC Developmental Education Initiative • Gates Foundation MOOC Grant —Photo by tattycat
    5. 5. Wake Tech’s MOOC • Targets students entering college • Addresses placement issues • Begins with the largest developmental group (math) • Leverages math modules created through NC reform
    6. 6. Wake Tech / Udacity PartnershipWake Tech / Udacity Partnership
    7. 7. “How the Brain Learns” “What surprised me was the way the class was taught. It was designed according to how the brain actually learns. In other words, it had almost nothing in common with most classes I’d taken before.” — Amanda Ripley
    8. 8. Developing theDeveloping the MOOCMOOC • Content specialists identifiedContent specialists identified • Partnerships/procedures establishedPartnerships/procedures established • Close communication through processClose communication through process • Wake Tech instructors write scriptsWake Tech instructors write scripts • Udacity talent onscreen and off- createUdacity talent onscreen and off- create productproduct —Photo by jurvetson
    9. 9. How will Wake Tech’s MOOC be used? • To prepare incoming students for placement or challenge tests • To justify student placement retest • To supplement traditional course delivery and facilitate innovative course delivery • To allow just-in-time remediation
    10. 10. MOOC DemoMOOC Demo
    11. 11. Who is Taking the MOOC and Why? 6,086 students were registered as of August 8, 2013 336 student earned a certificate of completion (6%) 963 students completed an entry survey (16% of those who began) 183 students completed an exit survey (3% of those who began, 54% of completers) Of students who completed the entry survey: 38% were outside of the United States 16% provided a North Carolina zip code 3.4% indicated they were preparing for the Wake Tech placement test 65% indicated they were taking the MOOC for personal development
    12. 12. Did Students Meet Their Goals? 6,086 students were registered as of August 8, 2013 336 student earned a certificate of completion (6%) 963 students completed an entry survey (16% of those who began) 183 students completed an exit survey (3% of those who began, 54% of completers) Of students who completed the exit survey: 92% indicated they would recommend the course 95% indicated that they met their goal 80% indicated that they had no challenges in completing the course 45% indicated that they had no suggestions to improve the course or that the course needed no improvement
    13. 13. Quality Matters Review While the course did not earn the QM certification, here are some reviewer comments: “… While the course has not met QM standards in its entirety, this is definitely one course that makes the learning of Algebra fun and relatively easy to comprehend. It's painless learning, at the best. I wish all students had the opportunity to take this course.” “Technical skills are not explicitly stated; however, the course does not require any special technology or skills, making such a statement unnecessary.” “The evaluation of student work is ongoing and immediate within each problem found within all lesson and sub-lesson topics. Student responses generate either a "Correct" or a Try Again" response following each answer submission. Each time, there is an opportunity to review the specified lesson narrative that accompanies each problem. The course format of presenting the content, assessing the student achievement of that content, providing immediate feedback on the correct solution, and then allowing the content to be reviewed is one of the course's strengths …”
    14. 14. Quality Matters Review More nice comments …. “I love the format of the course! The presentation is clean, consistent and very easy to understand. At no point was unsure what was expected of the learner. Concepts are explained clearly and accurately.” “Not only do the instructional materials have sufficient breadth and depth, but the instructional narrative and graphics in this course make it one of the best courses for teaching elementary Algebra concepts that I have encountered.” “Interactive learning opportunities that support active learning are found on each page of the lesson segments where participants must respond correctly in order to move to the next lesson segment. Discussion forums also allow for participants to interact with instructors and other participants over individual lesson segments. In addition, Meetups allow participants to further discuss lesson applications and work together to build understanding …”
    15. 15. What’s next for MOOCs at Wake Tech? Computer literacy Pre-college Chemistry

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