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Mkt 666-x1165 group b campaign wrap up idividual

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  • At the start of the term, our group embarked on a social media campaign for The Social Observer. The following is a summary of our campaign, including it’s objectives, execution, successes and recommendations for the future.
  • We’ll cover the campaign’s purpose, business objectives and key performance indicators, the content our group creating and disseminated, the promotion of our content executed through social channels, data collection from Google Analytics, success metrics from The Social Observer blog, Facebook, Twitter and Hootsuite, as well as insights as to what worked during out campaign, what didn’t work, and what we would recommend for the future.
  • When we came together, our group chose to target marketers who may just be starting to use social media for their healthcare organization. From there, we developed a plan to generate content the may appeals to that audience and disseminate and promote it using the blog, Facebook and Twitter.
  • We spent a good deal of time considering what this campaign should do for our “business,” and in a real-life scenario, we found it important to focus on increasing brand awareness, capturing quality leads, leveraging online influencers to build strong relationships, and to improve our search rankings.In order impact those objectives, we set very specific key performance indicators to measure throughout the campaign and indicate our success at its conclusion. We focused on increasing web traffic from social sources, including Facebook and Twitter, as well as increasing our followings on those two networks. We also aimed to increase the number of users subscribed to the blog and to receive responses to our content in the form of comments.
  • Our group developed a total of 10 blog posts sent throughout the month of November on a variety of topics related to healthcare social media including where to start, how to generate content and how to measure your success.
  • We created a custom dashboard in The Social Observer Google Analytics account to measure average visit duration – in general and by page – total visits from social sources – including those visits broken down by network – and bounce rates – in general and by page.
  • The dissemination of our content resulted in the following metrics on The Social Observer Blog.Visits to The Social Observer blog from social sources increased from 11 in October 2013 to 138 in November 2013 – or by 1,115%. This increase has a direct impacted on our business objectives of improved brand awareness andimproved search rankings.
  • 4 of our 10 posts had an average visit duration longer than 4 minutes. Another 4 of 10 blog posts had an average visit duration shorter than 1 minute. This tells us that our content was not consistent in retaining the attention of our visitors. Content with shorter average visit duration should be examined for ways in which it could be more enticing to promote a longer visit and for the user to finish reading the post.
  • The Whole Brain Marketing Blog tells us that a bounce rate of 50% or less is excellent, 50-60% is good, 60-70% is typical, 70-80% is poor, and 80+% is very bad.Overall, we had a bounce rate of 69.95% which puts us in the “typical” category. However, we had 5 blog posts that pulled our bounce rate down by being in the “poor” or “very bad” category. Those posts should be examined for ways in which they can direct users to other pages on the site for additional information, subscription, etc.
  • On average, our blog posts received 3.6 comments per post. Post #1 received the most comments with 10, while post #10 received the fewest comments with 0. It’s very clear from this data that the longer a post remains on the social observer blog, the more time it has to receive responses, and posting new blog posts a the end of the campaign may not have a positive affect on success metrics.
  • Lastly, subscriptions to the social observer blog increased from 46 at the end of October 2013 to 53 at the end of November 2013 – or by 15%. This has a direct impact on increasing brand awareness and lead generation.
  • Social promotion was used to drive traffic to each TSO post. A total of 13 posts on Facebook resulted in a total reach of 692, 1,915 impressions, 63 engaged users (which include likes, comments, shares and clicks), 51 post consumers (or 51 people who engaged with the Facebook post) and 0 negative feedback. A total of 26 tweets sent promoting the blog posts resulted in 55 retweets and 26 click-throughs.
  • Visits to The Social Observer blog from Facebook increased from 5 in October 2013 to 87 in November 2013 – or by 1,640%. This increase has a direct impact on our business objectives of improved brand awareness and leveraging the influence of online users engaging us on Facebook.
  • In addition, the campaign resulted in an increase of Facebook fans from 176 at the end of October 2013 to 191 at the end of November 2013 – or an increase of 9%. This also directly impacts increased brand awareness, and could have a possible affect on increasing lead generation.
  • The data displayed here is a sum of the reach, clicks, and engagement on Facebook posts promoting our TSO blog posts. The blog post “social media healthcare metrics - what does work for you” was shared on 3 separate occasions on Facebook and the blog posts “social media healthcare metrics: time to measure” and “HIPAA violations can be avoided with social media in healthcare” were shared on 2 separate occasions on Facebook. It is no surprise that the reach, clicks, and engagement metrics were the highest on these three posts.
  • Next, let’s take a look at Twitter results.Visits to The Social Observer blog from Twitter increased from 0 in October 2013 to 30 in November 2013 – or by 3,000%. This increase has a direct impact on our business objectives of improved brand awareness and leveraging the influence of online users engaging us on Twitter.
  • Unfortunately, the social observer Twitter followers only increased by 1 during the campaign. As a result, this has no positive impact on our business objectives.
  • In total, there were 26 tweets sent from the social observer handle promoting our healthcare blog posts. Those tweets received 55 retweets and 26 clicks.
  • Looking back on our KPIs, we can confidently say that we achieved 5 of our 7 goals. While we were very close to increasing Facebook fans by 10%, we really struggled to achieve our goal of increasing Twitter followers.
  • While we did not set KPI goals for bounce rate and average visit duration, we can conclude that we were somewhat unsuccessful with those metrics. As previously mentioned, our overall bounce rate fell in the high range of “typical,” so while it could have been worse, there were several posts that were performing poorly in relation to bounce rate. In addition, average visit durations on most posts were very low.
  • In general, our group concluded that using a good mix of channels to promote content works well. In the future, additional channels may have been considered to spread our reach even further.In our social promotion on Twitter, our group used a variety of different hashtags from the healthcare and marketing worlds that most likely had a very positive affect on our reach and engagement.Lastly, making personal asks of social connections like friends and colleagues to like the social observer Facebook improved fan growth, and should have been extended to Twitter
  • Our group concluded that our use of tools to help streamline our strategy could have been improved. Perhaps a different set of tools would have made our planning efforts more successful.In addition, our strategy regarding hashtags and visuals was inconsistent and we should have been more planful regarding those elements prior to the campaign launch. On a similar note, our posting schedule should have also been more planned-out as there were several blog posts as well as social promotions sent out on the same days, which we noticed was detrimental to our success metrics.Overall, we had weak calls-to-action, which again should have been clearly defined prior to the start of the campaign and directly tied to our business objectives and KPI goals.Lastly, the lack of engagement by group members to promote each others content was a hugely missed opportunity. More sharing, commenting, retweeting, etc. by individuals could have very positively impacted the success of our campaign.
  • After looking at what worked and what didn’t, we were able to provide the following recommendations for similar and future campaigns.First of all, as previously mentioned, the group must make better use of the available tools in order to complete a successful campaign.In addition, more social promotion of the blog posts should be executed from both the social observer accounts, as well as group members individual accounts.Another thing that could impact the success of the campaign would be an improved design of the social observer blog, as well as additional access for group members to create features like pages, forms, etc.Again, as previously mentioned, hashtags and visuals are important elements of the campaign and should be considered prior to developing the blog content.Another important element our group noted was timing. Timing should be considered when posting on Faceobok and Twitter with regards to the data those networks and other tools provide as to when your followers are active.Lastly, CTAs should be added to social promotion asking users to “like” a Facebook post or “retweet” a tweet. This has been a proven tactic for marketers that our group did not take advantage of.
  • In conclusion, our healthcare social media campaign showed promise with regards to quantitative data. However, we failed to collect enough qualitative data from online users to evaluate whether our KPIs really had an impact on our business objectives. In order to really understand that aspect, a longer campaign may be required with additional resources.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Healthcare Social Media Campaign
    • 2. Agenda • • • • • Purpose Objectives Content Creation Social Promotion Google Analytics • • • • • Results & Success What Worked What Didn’t Work Recommendations Conclusions
    • 3. Purpose • Develop a targeted social media marketing campaign focusing on a specific industry and audience – Healthcare – Social Media Marketers • Generate content aimed at supporting business objectives – The Social Observer Blog – Facebook – Twitter • Leverage online tools to deliver content seemlessly – – – – HootSuite Facebook Twitter Wordpress
    • 4. Campaign Objectives Business Goals • Increase brand awareness • Capture quality leads • Leverage online influencers • Improve search rankings KPIs • Increase total web traffic from social sources by 150% • Increase web traffic from Facebook by 500% • Increase web traffic from Twitter by 300% • Increase Facebook fans by10% • Increase Twitter followers by 10% • Increase blog subscribers by 10% • Receive at least 3 comments per blog post
    • 5. Content Creation Title Author Date 4 Questions to Ask When Targeting Healthcare Consumers on Social Media Lauren 11/2/2013 Content Marketing for Health Care: The Right Prescription Tami 11/4/2013 Essential Components of Content Creation for Healthcare Tami 11/07/2013 Social Media Healthcare Metrics – What Does Work For You Katja 11/08/2013 5 Ways To Manage Your Social Media Presence, A Healthcare Provider Guide Brian 11/11/2013 3 Simple Steps to Start Using Social Media to Market Your Healthcare Organization Brian 11/15/2013 HIPAA Violations Can Be Avoided with Social Media In Healthcare Devin 11/18/2013 Social Media Healthcare Metrics: Time To Measure Katja 11/18/2013 Content Creation for Healthcare Organizations Tami 11/19/2013 Social Media Tools: What your Healthcare Organization Needs Katja 11/22/2013
    • 6. Google Analytics Custom dashboard created to monitor campaign metrics
    • 7. Results – TSO Visits to The Social Observer blog increased by 1,115%, which: • improved brand awareness • improved search rankings Visits from Social Sources 160 140 138 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 11 Oct-13 Nov-13
    • 8. Results – TSO Avg. Visit Duration Per Post 0:05:46 0:05:02 0:04:19 0:03:36 0:02:53 0:02:10 0:01:26 0:00:43 0:00:00 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 • 4 of 10 posts had an average visit duration longer than 4:00 • 4 of 10 posts had an average visit duration shorter than 1:00
    • 9. Results – TSO A bounce rate of: Bounce Rate Per Post • 50% or less is excellent (0 posts from our campaign) 90% • 50-60% is good (1 post) 70% 40% 30% 20% 10% #10 #9 #8 #7 #6 #5 #4 0% #3 • 80%+ is very bad (2 posts) 50% #2 • 70-80% is poor (3 posts) 60% #1 • 60-70% is typical (4 posts) 80%
    • 10. Results – TSO Responses Per Post 12 10 8 6 4 2 #10 #9 #8 #7 #6 #5 #4 #3 #2 0 #1 • Average number of responses/comments per blog post: 3.6 responses.
    • 11. Results – TSO The Social Observer blog subscriptions increased by 15%, which contributed to increased: • brand awareness • lead generation Blog Subscriptions 54 53 52 50 48 46 46 44 42 Oct-13 Nov-13
    • 12. Results – Social Promotion Facebook Twitter • A total of 13 posts resulted in: • A total of 26 tweets resulted in: – – – – – 692 total reach 1915 total impressions 63 engaged users 51 post consumers 0 negative feedback – 55 retweets – 26 click-throughs
    • 13. Results – Facebook Visits to The Social Observer blog from Facebook increased by 1,640%, which: • increased brand awareness among Facebook users • leveraged influence of online influencers engaging on Facebook Visits from Facebook 100 90 87 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 5 Oct-13 Nov-13
    • 14. Results – Facebook The Social Observer Facebook Fans increased by 9%, which: • increased brand awareness • possibly contributed to increased lead generation Facebook Fans 195 191 190 185 180 175 176 170 165 Oct-13 Nov-13
    • 15. Results – Facebook Blog Post Shared Reach Clicks Engagement 4 Questions to Ask When Targeting Healthcare Consumers on Social Media 28 3 8 Content Marketing for Health Care: The Right Prescription 60 7 10 3 7 232 4 12 5 Ways To Manage Your Social Media Presence, A Healthcare Provider Guide 71 13 8 3 Simple Steps to Start Using Social Media to Market Your Healthcare Organization 75 1 8 HIPAA Violations Can Be Avoided with Social Media In Healthcare** 93 15 12 Social Media Healthcare Metrics: Time To Measure** 88 12 13 Content Creation for Healthcare Organizations 25 9 6 Social Media Tools: What your Healthcare Organization Needs 21 0 2 Essential Components of Content Creation for Healthcare Social Media Healthcare Metrics – What Does Work For You*
    • 16. Results – Twitter Visits to The Social Observer blog from Twitter increased by 3,000%, which: • increased brand awareness among Twitter users • leveraged the knowledge of healthcare influencers on Twitter Visits from Twitter 35 30 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 0 Oct-13 Nov-13
    • 17. Results – Twitter The Social Observer Twitter Followers increased by 0%, which did not positively impact business objectives Twitter Followers 262 262 261.8 261.6 261.4 261.2 261 261 260.8 260.6 260.4 Oct-13 Nov-13
    • 18. Results – Twitter Twitter Promotion 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 TSO Tweets RTs by Others Link Clicks
    • 19. Campaign Success KPI Goals • • • • • • • Increase total web traffic from social sources by 150% - ACHIEVED Increase web traffic from Facebook by 500% - ACHIEVED Increase web traffic from Twitter by 300% - ACHIEVED Increase Facebook fans by 10% - FAILED Increase Twitter followers by 10% - FAILED Increase blog subscribers by 10% - ACHIEVED Receive at least 3 comments per blog post - ACHIEVED
    • 20. Campaign Success Bounce Rate • Bounce rates on all posts were sub-par • Healthcare content was generally unsuccessful in translating to additional page views on The Social Observer and thereby capturing quality leads Average Visit Duration • Average visit durations were low • Healthcare content was generally unsuccessful at retaining users to read the entire article and thereby increasing brand awareness
    • 21. What Worked • Use of various social media channels – TSO blog (comments, sharing with other channels than Facebook, Twitter) – Facebook (likes, comments, sharing) – Twitter (retweet, reply) • A variety of hashtags used in promotion generated improved reach and engagement • Making personal asks of social connections to “like” or follow improved audience growth
    • 22. What Didn’t Work • Use of tools that would have helped streamline our strategy – TSO calendar – Project Plan - Google Drive • • • • Inconsistent strategy with hashtags and visuals Overlapping content without defined posting schedule Weak calls-to-action Lack of engagement by group members to foster active communication throughout the social media channels (TSO comments, Facebook comments, Twitter reply)
    • 23. Recommendations • Better use of available tools to monitor strategy and performance (project plan, blog calendar, video conferencing) • More social promotion from TSO accounts and campaign members’ personal accounts • Improve site design of TSO • More effective and strategic use of visuals, media and hashtags • Experiment with post timing based on Facebook and Twitter data • Add CTAs to social promotion (“Like this post” or “please retweet)
    • 24. Conclusion The healthcare social media campaign showed promising quantitative success in such a short period of time. However, to have a more positive effect on business objectives, a lengthier and more strategic plan will be required after considering the outcomes of the November 2013 campaign. A campaign extension should include previously state recommendations, as well as a more formalized promotional plan.
    • 25. References Hendryx-Parker, C. (2012, May 23). Healthcare Marketers' Top 5 Challenges. Retrieved from Six Feet Up: http://www.sixfeetup.com/blog/healthcare-marketers-top-5-challenges Ibeh, K. (2005). E-branding strategies of internet. BRAND MANAGEMENT, 12(5), 355-373. Retrieved from http://avyg86.dsl.pipex.com/ecom/ebranding_strategies_of_internet_e.pdf Lowe, S. (2013, July 09). Bounce rate and average time on page: More analytical ammunition. Whole Brain Marketing Blog. Retrieved from http://www.weidert.com/whole_brain_marketing_blog/bid/116966/Bounce-Rate-and-AverageTime-on-Page-More-Analytical-Ammunition Malaga, R. (2007). The value of search engine optimization. Journal of Electronic Commerce in Organizations, Volume 5(Issue 3), 68-82. Retrieved from http://hwang.cisdept.csupomona.edu/cis451/docs/seo/The value of seo.pdf Pew Research Center. (2010, February 24). The Millennials: Confident. Connected. Open to Change. . Retrieved from pewresearch.org: http://www.pewresearch.org/millenials Quancast. (2013). Social Media Examiner. Retrieved from Quancast.com: www.quantcast.com/socialmediaexaminer.com Quancast. (2013). Social Media Explorer. Retrieved from Quancast.com: www.quantcast.com/socialmediaexplorer.com Quancast. (2013). Social Media Today. Retrieved from Quancast.com: www.quantcast.com/socialmediatoday.com Smarty, A. (2013, January 02). What is normal bounce rate? (weekly Q&A). Internet Marketing Ninjas. Retrieved from http://www.internetmarketingninjas.com/blog/search-engine-optimization/normal-bounce-rate/ University of San Francisco. (n.d.). 5 Traits of a Great Internet Marketer. Retrieved from usanfranonline.com: http://www.usanfranonline.com/traits-of-a-great-internet-marketer/ Vallamsetty, U. (2003). Characterization of e-commerce traffic. Electronic Commerce Research, 3, 167-192.