Measuring Progress Towards College and Career Readiness

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The term College and Career Readiness (CCR) is often used, but the actual steps it takes to prepare students towards this goal is not consistently defined. In light of recent education reforms, NCEA …

The term College and Career Readiness (CCR) is often used, but the actual steps it takes to prepare students towards this goal is not consistently defined. In light of recent education reforms, NCEA will use this presentation to focus on why CCR should be the standard for all students. State standards may improve student learning, but numerous studies show that reaching for such standards is not enough. NCEA will also feature its College and Career Readiness Ramp and how this can be a tool to measuring student progress towards CCR.

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  • Intro me
  • Our goal is CCR for all students. We are an ACT-owned organization and our primary focus is helping educators create better school systems so that they can increase student achievement. We identify the best-practices of higher performing schools in our research, and we also have services we offer that help educators better understand their data so they can make more informed decisions.
  • What does that mean? It means every student has an equal opportunity to receive an education despite their background. So regardless of race, socio-economic status, or upbringing – they will graduate from high school with the skills and knowledge they need to pursue their dreams with success. This means higher-education or vocational jobs.
  • What does that mean? It means every student has an equal opportunity to receive an education despite their background. So regardless of race, socio-economic status, or upbringing – they will graduate from high school with the skills and knowledge they need to pursue their dreams with success. This means higher-education or vocational jobs.
  • What does that mean? It means every student has an equal opportunity to receive an education despite their background. So regardless of race, socio-economic status, or upbringing – they will graduate from high school with the skills and knowledge they need to pursue their dreams with success. This means higher-education or vocational jobs.
  • One way, and the most common, is using state standards. Proficient on a test means you pass. You pass all your tests. You pass high school . Then you are prepared for postsecondary endeavors. Right?
  • One way, and the most common, is using state standards. Proficient on a test means you pass. You pass all your tests. You pass high school . Then you are prepared for postsecondary endeavors. Right?
  • That’s how it is supposed to work. But what our research shows is that this is not true. (SHOW SOME RESEARCH HERE EXPRESSING POINTS) Passing is not enough. Passing does not mean you are ready for college. Passing does not mean you are ready for a skilled career.
  • That’s how it is supposed to work. But what our research shows is that this is not true. (SHOW SOME RESEARCH HERE EXPRESSING POINTS) Passing is not enough. Passing does not mean you are ready for college. Passing does not mean you are ready for a skilled career.
  • That’s how it is supposed to work. But what our research shows is that this is not true. (SHOW SOME RESEARCH HERE EXPRESSING POINTS) Passing is not enough. Passing does not mean you are ready for college. Passing does not mean you are ready for a skilled career.
  • That’s how it is supposed to work. But what our research shows is that this is not true. (SHOW SOME RESEARCH HERE EXPRESSING POINTS) Passing is not enough. Passing does not mean you are ready for college. Passing does not mean you are ready for a skilled career.
  • That’s how it is supposed to work. But what our research shows is that this is not true. (SHOW SOME RESEARCH HERE EXPRESSING POINTS) Passing is not enough. Passing does not mean you are ready for college. Passing does not mean you are ready for a skilled career.
  • That’s how it is supposed to work. But what our research shows is that this is not true. (SHOW SOME RESEARCH HERE EXPRESSING POINTS) Passing is not enough. Passing does not mean you are ready for college. Passing does not mean you are ready for a skilled career.
  • One way, and the most common, is using state standards. Proficient on a test means you pass. You pass all your tests. You pass high school . Then you are prepared for postsecondary endeavors. Right?
  • CCR has to be anchored to research that proves that hitting a mark means something. Our CCR Targets is what a student must hit in order to be successful in postsecondary endeavors. What does successful mean? It means they can take entry level college courses without remediation, and that they will be successful in those courses. They have the ability to take college courses, learn from them, and do well. What about career readiness?We have found through our research, that preparing for this requires the same academic level as preparing for college readiness. You need to have the same academic preparation for both.
  • Explain the process. How do we measure it?We Use ACT’s College Readiness Benchmarks (successfully taking college courses) and map it backwards – So ACT has found that a student must score this on their 11th grade tests to have what it takes to do well in postsecondary work. We take that and map it backwards to the 3rd grade.We now have CCR Targets for a student starting in grade 3.This is the path to CCR. This goes into one of our bigger concepts – the CCR Ramp.
  • We connect these goals and this forms our ramp. The ramp progressively builds on a students knowledge and skill set each year. Our students must have rigorous courses AND be prepared for them. The trajectory for hitting CCR Targets each year is increasingly challenging each year. So a student must continue to move upward each year. CCR is a culmination that builds upward – not one singular, hallmark moment. It is a process. So that defines the path for students who are already on the ramp. Each year they must keep moving along that ramp, and then they will reach CCR when they graduate.
  • Research shows that state standards may help prepare a student, but it is not enough for them to pursue postsecondary endeavors. Life does not stop after high school. Every student will do something after they graduate – whether 4 year school, pHD, 2 year, or a vocational school – every student will need preparation to move forward in life.  So state standards does not mean CCR.
  • One way, and the most common, is using state standards. Proficient on a test means you pass. You pass all your tests. You pass high school . Then you are prepared for postsecondary endeavors. Right?
  • One way, and the most common, is using state standards. Proficient on a test means you pass. You pass all your tests. You pass high school . Then you are prepared for postsecondary endeavors. Right?
  • Mention ACT – TEA tests, Using the College Readiness System.

Transcript

  • 1. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Measuring Progress Towards College and Career Readiness – Not Just State Standards
    National Center for Educational Achievement (NCEA)
    Efrain Mercado
    Director of Outreach
    April 29, 2010
  • 2. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Lisa NguyenWebinar ModeratorNational Center for Educational Achievement
  • 3. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Webinar Orientation
    • Presentation Mode
    During the presentations everyone is muted except presenters
    • Audio
    You may use your telephone (enter in Audio pin provided after entering this webinar) or your computer microphone.
    Select one: Use telephone
    Use Mic & Speakers
  • 4. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Webinar Orientation
    • For questions during the webinar,
    please type them in the
    ‘Questions’ chat box.
    *If you cannot see it, please make sure the ‘Questions’ chat box
    is not minimized. Enlarge button is in the right hand corner.
    • We will take questions at the end. You may type them
    in the ‘Questions’ chat box or use your telephone.
  • 5. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Efrain MercadoDirector of OutreachNational Center for Educational Achievement
  • 6. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    College and Career Readiness For All
    Our Mission
    The National Center for Educational Achievement is a non-profit, ACT organization committed to helping raise the bar on student achievement by providing educators and policymakers with best practice research and data-driven tools to prepare all students for postsecondary success.
  • 7. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Agenda
    1. What is College and Career Readiness (CCR)?
    2. How do we measure progress towards CCR?
    3. NCEA’s Approach to Measuring Progress Towards
    CCR
    4. When do we measure progress towards CCR?
    4. Resources for Measuring Progress
    5. Q & A
  • 8. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    What is College and Career Readiness?
  • 9. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    A student is College and Career Ready when…
    they have passed all state tests at the proficient or passing level
    b) they have received a high school diploma
    c) they have graduated with honors/straight A’s from high school
    d) they have applied and been accepted into a post-secondary institution (vocational school, university, or community college)
  • 10. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    College and Career Readiness is a bigger concept.
  • 11. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    How does NCEA define College and Career Readiness?
    When a student has reached an academic achievement level that indicates they are likely to have success in post-secondary learning that leads to skilled careers, then they are college and career ready.
  • 12. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    The Big Question
    How do we measure progress towards College and Career Readiness?
  • 13. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    How?
    Passing/Proficient?
    Commended or Advanced?
    College Readiness Benchmarks?
  • 14. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    One Method:
    Using State Standards
  • 15. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Percentage of Texas Students Proficient/Passing in 2009
    Math Reading Science
  • 16. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    But is it enough?
  • 17. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Percent of Texas Students Hitting NCEA’s College and Career Readiness Targets in 2009
    Math Reading Science
  • 18. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Percentage of Arkansas Students Proficient/Passing in 2009
    Math Reading Science
  • 19. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Percentage of Arkansas Students Hitting NCEA’s College and Career Readiness Targets in 2009
    Math Reading Science
  • 20. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    What about commended or advanced?
  • 21. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Now we know…
    Passing/Proficient is not enough.
    Commended/Advanced is not anchored to anything and varies from state to state.
    College Readiness Benchmarks
  • 22. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    NCEA’s Approach to Measuring Progress Towards College and Career Readiness
    Identify College and Career Readiness Targets
    anchored to ACT’s College Readiness Benchmarks
  • 23. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Identifying College and Career Readiness Targets
    How does NCEA do this?
    Linking to ACT College Readiness Benchmarks
    Backwards-Mapping the Target
    Establish Students’ Yearly Growth Goals
  • 24. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Keeping Students on the Path to College and Career Readiness
    NCEA’s CCR Ramp is a defined path to get students to college and career readiness.
    • Students on the ramp must experience average growth to stay on the ramp.
    • 25. Students below the ramp must achieve faster than average growth.
  • Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Another Big Question…
    When do we start measuring progress towards College and Career Readiness?
  • 26. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Senior Year?
    Junior Year?
    Even earlier?
  • 27. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Using ACT’s College Readiness System
    8th Grade -
    10th Grade -
    11th/12th Grade -
  • 28. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    8th/9th Grade
    10th Grade
    11th/12th Grade
    36
    32
    25
  • 29. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Resources for Measuring Progress
    • Using formative tests to check student achievement along the way (e.g. benchmark assessments)
    • 30. Summative tests to see if students have reached College and Career Readiness standards (ACT’s College Readiness System)
  • Identify. Inform. Improve.
    “Education is the process of training, growth, and development that enables the individual to make satisfactory adjustments to ever-changing conditions and environments.”Dr. Wesley L. BoykinNCEA’s Director of Research
  • 31. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Q & A
    Type in questions into the ‘Questions’ box.
    To ask in, ‘Raise Hand’ and we will unmute you.
    Efrain Mercado
    Director of Outreach
    National Center for Educational Achievement
  • 32. More Resources:
    Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Texas and Arkansas College and Career Readiness Charts for every public school:
    http://nc4ea.org/index.cfm/e/initiatives.just_for_the_kids
    What are ACT’s College Readiness Benchmarks?
    http://act.org/research/policymakers/pdf/benchmarks.pdf
    The Texas Education Agency (TEA), in collaboration with ACT, is making the College Preparation Assessments (Texas Education Code 39.0261) available to the schools in your district.
    http://act.org/aap/texas/index.html
  • 33. Identify. Inform. Improve.
    Thank you for attending our webinar!
    Contact:
    Efrain Mercado
    emercado@nc4ea.org
    512.320.1800