The Reality of Innovation and its Implications for Projects Andy Hall LINK-United Nations University-MERIT Learning INnova...
Development:  A Knowledge-Intensive Process <ul><li>Using knowledge, information and ideas to add value to existing resour...
Integrated Nature of Issues <ul><li>Fodder/ Seed Systems / Flexibility in Governance Systems </li></ul><ul><li>Transport /...
What is Innovation? <ul><li>Adoption of new technology </li></ul><ul><li>New ways of organising farmers to do things </li>...
Partnership (Networking) <ul><li>What for? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Problem identification </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accessi...
Second-Third (etc.)  generation problems <ul><li>Sorghum — Yolk colour </li></ul><ul><li>Organic production — Confinement ...
Skill Development  <ul><li>New skills as part of a bigger set of activities </li></ul>Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy...
Reflection on how results were achieved (Redefining Objectives) <ul><li>Sorghum coalition continued to work because they f...
Implications for  Projects and Organisations <ul><li>Defining problems much more holistically --  farming system but also ...
Implications for  Projects and Organisations <ul><li>Multiple types of innovation require different and diverse partners. ...
Implications for  Projects and Organisations <ul><li>Need to recognise that making links is a specific activity and workin...
Implications for  Projects and Organisations <ul><li>New problems need new partners </li></ul><ul><li>New problems cannot ...
Implications for  Projects and Organisations <ul><li>Research, training, extension advocacy for policy change are all task...
Implications for  Projects and Organisations <ul><li>Systematically reflecting on how success was achieved  </li></ul><ul>...
LINK is a specialist network of regional innovation policy studies hubs established by the United Nations University-MERIT...
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The Reality of Innovation and its Implications for Projects

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Not just the adoption of new technology, (agricultural) innovation also involves a new way of organising farmers to do things, of marketing crops and implementing new projects and new policies. Here we discuss the implications for projects and initiatives.

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The Reality of Innovation and its Implications for Projects

  1. 1. The Reality of Innovation and its Implications for Projects Andy Hall LINK-United Nations University-MERIT Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy-relevant Resources for Rural Innovation
  2. 2. Development: A Knowledge-Intensive Process <ul><li>Using knowledge, information and ideas to add value to existing resources and skills to create social and economic outcomes in a sustainable way </li></ul>Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy-relevant Resources for Rural Innovation
  3. 3. Integrated Nature of Issues <ul><li>Fodder/ Seed Systems / Flexibility in Governance Systems </li></ul><ul><li>Transport / Animal Health/ Water Resource Development/ Infrastructure/ Marketing / Policy </li></ul><ul><li>Animal Traction/ Confinement / Fodder / Fodder Production / Seed Production </li></ul>Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy-relevant Resources for Rural Innovation
  4. 4. What is Innovation? <ul><li>Adoption of new technology </li></ul><ul><li>New ways of organising farmers to do things </li></ul><ul><li>New ways of marketing crops </li></ul><ul><li>New ways of implementing projects </li></ul><ul><ul><li>new groupings of partners, new methodologies, new strategies </li></ul></ul><ul><li>New policies </li></ul>Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy-relevant Resources for Rural Innovation
  5. 5. Partnership (Networking) <ul><li>What for? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Problem identification </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accessing resources/ funds/ skills/ technology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Joint problem-solving </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Who with? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Farmers/ individuals/ groups/ associations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Research organisations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Private sector and NGOs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>When? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Different partners at different times for different reasons </li></ul></ul>Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy-relevant Resources for Rural Innovation
  6. 6. Second-Third (etc.) generation problems <ul><li>Sorghum — Yolk colour </li></ul><ul><li>Organic production — Confinement and bulls — Fodder strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Fodder — Seed systems </li></ul><ul><li>A continuously-evolving set of problems </li></ul>Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy-relevant Resources for Rural Innovation
  7. 7. Skill Development <ul><li>New skills as part of a bigger set of activities </li></ul>Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy-relevant Resources for Rural Innovation
  8. 8. Reflection on how results were achieved (Redefining Objectives) <ul><li>Sorghum coalition continued to work because they found the approach useful </li></ul><ul><li>Transport project </li></ul>Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy-relevant Resources for Rural Innovation
  9. 9. Implications for Projects and Organisations <ul><li>Defining problems much more holistically -- farming system but also much wider system of markets, government structures and policy </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore need to tackle farm level, market level and policy level innovations all within the same project </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore also need to think about who defines the problem, and follow opportunities rather that just constraints. Negotiating objectives rather than setting them. </li></ul>Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy-relevant Resources for Rural Innovation
  10. 10. Implications for Projects and Organisations <ul><li>Multiple types of innovation require different and diverse partners. </li></ul><ul><li>Village-level groupings for on-the-ground ownerships and outcomes, but also groups of stakeholders at operational and policy levels who can make change happen at their level </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore, the need to have skills and time to identify partners and nurture partnerships that work. (Ritualistic partnerships don’t help) </li></ul>Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy-relevant Resources for Rural Innovation
  11. 11. Implications for Projects and Organisations <ul><li>Need to recognise that making links is a specific activity and working out how to do it is a research task </li></ul><ul><li>There is no one way of catalysing groupings/linkages and partnerships. This always has to be investigated in a particular context. It needs to be experimented with </li></ul>Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy-relevant Resources for Rural Innovation
  12. 12. Implications for Projects and Organisations <ul><li>New problems need new partners </li></ul><ul><li>New problems cannot be predicted and need an approach that recognises this </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Action, Research, Flexibility </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Need mechanisms for identifying new problems and identifying the partners needed to help solve these </li></ul>Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy-relevant Resources for Rural Innovation
  13. 13. Implications for Projects and Organisations <ul><li>Research, training, extension advocacy for policy change are all tasks that need to be part of a project </li></ul><ul><li>………..And not necessarily in that order </li></ul>Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy-relevant Resources for Rural Innovation
  14. 14. Implications for Projects and Organisations <ul><li>Systematically reflecting on how success was achieved </li></ul><ul><li>Need for mid-course correction and developing capacity for future projects (of self and others) </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore, need specific mechanisms and skills to do this in projects/ organisations </li></ul>Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy-relevant Resources for Rural Innovation
  15. 15. LINK is a specialist network of regional innovation policy studies hubs established by the United Nations University-MERIT (UNU-MERIT) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) to strengthen the interface between rural innovation studies, policy and practice and to promote North-South and South-South learning on rural innovation. Learning INnovation Knowledge Policy-relevant Resources for Rural Innovation

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