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Mri In Stress Fractures
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Mri In Stress Fractures

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  • 1. Ruling out Fractures Use of magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose fracture in light of negative plain films
  • 2. Case Report • 48 year old white female with no history of trauma reports having 2-3 months history of discomfort in the right foot and ankle • A presumptive diagnosis of common heel pain or Plantar fasciitis is made
  • 3. Case Report • Plain films show no pathology to foot or ankle • Patient has continued pain after a period of soft casting of the site and Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory therapy
  • 4. Case Report • A 3-phase technetium™ bone scan is done to look for other pathology and is hot at the calcaneus of the right foot. • A magnetic resonance imaging study is done and shows a through and through calcaneal fracture at the midbody aspect of the tuber
  • 5. Imaging • Plain film read as no pathology although a subtle area of sclerosis is noted at the superior calcaneus
  • 6. 3-phase technetium™ bone scan • Scan is hot throughout the calcaneus
  • 7. MR Images • Clear line of fracture seen through the body of the os calcis
  • 8. MR Images
  • 9. MR Images
  • 10. Conclusions • The use of the MR scan in light of negative films allowed visualization of the fracture • Continued symptomotology with negative films would indicate further studies • As the 3-phase scan didn’t locate the fracture, the magnetic resonance imaging was actually more cost- effective

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