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FINAL Multigenerational+ Workforce
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FINAL Multigenerational+ Workforce

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FINAL Multigenerational+ Workforce FINAL Multigenerational+ Workforce Presentation Transcript

  •  
    • Define the benefits of having different generations in the workplace.
    • Describe the work ethics and values of different generations in healthcare today.
    • Teach techniques on working cohesively together in a multigenerational work environment.
    • Identify common interests and differences (strengths and weaknesses) related to healthcare delivery among the different age groups of nurses.
    • Discuss how the multigenerational workforce will effect nurses entering the workforce.
    • Discuss how to take an active role in the multigenerational workforce upon entering the workplace, without becoming passive.
  • (Weston, 2006) Veteran Generation 1922-1945 Baby Boomer Generation 1945-1960 Generation X 1960-1980 Millennial Generation 1980-2000
    • Members of this generation were taught to be “seen not heard”, and they were taught to obey their parents, teachers, and other authority figures.
    • This generation has been instilled with the expectation sacrifice, and hard work are rewarded.
    • Veterans today value loyalty, respect authority, and expect rewards for hard work.
    (Weston, 2006)
    • Think: The introduction of television!
    • Majority of this generation grew up in two-parent households where the father earned income and the mother was the primary care-taker of the home.
    • Boomers viewed the future with optimism and promise from an early age.
    (Weston, 2006)
    • The changing world and societal views put an emphasis on being yourself, developing the “me” generation.
    • The new pattern was lack of conformity to old rules.
    • Everything was debatable including the role of women and people of color in society.
    • The heroes were no longer men in positions of authority, but those who questioned the norm.
    • Boomers believe in questioning authority, and if you want a change, ban together and make it happen.
    (Weston, 2006)
    • These children lived in two-career households, with a rising divorce rate that left many in single parent households.
    • Development of the “latch key” generation in which many children learned to fend for themselves.
    • This generation is assertive, self-directed, and comfortable with technology.
    • Very media savvy, expect instant access to information.
    (Weston, 2006)
    • This generation watched their family members sacrifice leisure time for working hours, and now values more short-term jobs, and a balance in work and social life.
    • Seek more temporary positions such as float pool, travel nursing, and “free agent”.
    (Weston, 2006)
    • Most of us graduating in this class!
    • Many born to older mothers, and both parents involved if not together.
    • Both parents work, and childcare and after school programs are plentiful.
    • These individuals are highly structured and scheduled. (Ex. Horse riding, piano, ballet, soccer)
    (Weston, 2006)
    • Have grown up in multicultural, multiethnic surroundings. (Ex. Biracial marriages)
    • Live in a constantly connected environment through internet, text messaging, etc.
    • Many volunteer through different organizations.
    • Seen as sociable, confident, optimistic, talented, well-educated, open-minded.
    (Weston, 2006)
    • Nurses can grow with mutual respect towards one another if each generation takes the time to look at why the other acts in a certain manner.
    • Example: If the younger generations (X, and Millennial) would try to understand the background of the Veterans and Boomers, they would develop a respect for them as they start to understand where they developed such loyalty to stick to one place, and vice versa.
    (Weston, 2006)
    • Diversity is "creating and maintaining an environment in which each person is respected because of his or her differences“ (Davis, 2001, p.161)
    • A well diverse team offers a strategic advantage in not only individual nurses, but also as a nursing team as a whole.
    (Weston, 2006)
  •  
    • They are dedicated to their facility, probably having been there for years.
    • They are wise, with experience comes knowledge.
    • They work hard in order to reap benefits.
    • They work for personal fullfillment.
    • Long to make a contribution.
    (Weston, 2006)
    • Technology savvy
    • Resourceful, and can adapt to situations
    • Culturally competent
    • Open-minded
    • Highly structured, makes the most of their days through planning
    (Weston, 2006)
  •  
  • ( Duchsher & Cowin, 2004)
    • Diversity was not commonly experienced or understood
    • Rules were unambiguous
    • Future was predictable and bright
    • Organizations were unapologetically hierarchical with clear divisions of labor
    • Familiarity in the workplace fostered conformity, consistency, and uniformity
    ( Duchsher & Cowin, 2004)
    • Makes decisions based on a utilitarian and militaristic authority tradition
    • Decisions should not be taken lightly nor hastily dismissed
    • Support institutional loyalty engendered by the indoctrinated belief that the commanded collective, rather than the impervious individual, accomplishes the task at hand
    ( Duchsher & Cowin, 2004)
    • Motto “Living to Work”
    • Intrinsically motivated
    • Look consistently to external sources for validation of their worth
    • Equate work with personal fulfillment and self-worth
    • Distinctly competitive
    • Little familiarity with delayed gratification
    • Strong willed
    ( Duchsher & Cowin, 2004)
    • Invented the word “workaholic”
    • Defined by their jobs
    • Can be expected to work longer then the traditional retirement year ceiling
    • May be the least likely to embrace the personality characteristics and the professional ambitions of Generation X and Millennial new nursing graduates
    ( Duchsher & Cowin, 2004)
    • Described as: alienated, skeptical, cynical, anti-institutional, nonconformist, and radically individualistic
    • Murray claimed that they are a “far cry from the moralistic, self-righteous true believers of the Baby Boomer generation”
    ( Duchsher & Cowin, 2004)
    • Manage their own time
    • Set their own limits
    • Accomplish their work without supervision
    • Unimpressed with authority
    • Less willing to make excessive sacrifices for their jobs sake
    ( Duchsher & Cowin, 2004)
    • Warm
    • Confident
    • Upbeat
    • Determined
    • Optimistic about their future
    ( Duchsher & Cowin, 2004)
    • Deeply engaged and cooperative teamwork
    • Desire for hard-earned achievement and recognition
    • Respect for authority
    • Acceptance of hierarchy
    • Modesty evolving from a grounded moral code of conduct
    ( Duchsher & Cowin, 2004)
    • Favor a collective, cohesive, and collaborative approach to teamwork
    • Expect mutual support, trust, commitment, and community in their work relationships
    • Expect workplace to give clear and concise directions
    ( Duchsher & Cowin, 2004)
    • Expect to be rewarded consistently
    • More trusting of centralized authority
    • Able to organize, motivate, and mobilize their own work ethic
    • Share a loyal and optimistic energy with their workplace
    ( Duchsher & Cowin, 2004)
  •  
    • TODAY FOUR GENERATIONS ARE WORKING SHOULDER TO SHOULDER IN THE WORKPLACE
    • THERE ARE MANY DIFFERENCES IN THE DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS THAT CAN LEAD TO INTERGENERATIONAL CONFLICT
    • GENERATIONAL CONFLICTS AREN’T ONLY BECAUSE OF THE AGE GAPS, THEY ARISE FROM THE STRESS THAT ALL ORGANIZATIONS FACE AS THEY EVOLVE
    (Martin, 2004)
    • TODAY’S NURSES ARE FACING A TRANSITION FROM THE WORKPLACE OF THE PAST, WHERE COMMAND AND CONTROL LEADERSHIP AND PAY YOUR DUES AND CASH OUT AT RETIREMENT EXPECTATIONS RULED, INTO A WORKPLACE WHERE GLOBALIZATION, TECHNOLOGY, FIERCE COMPETITION, UNPREDICTABLE STAFFING NEEDS, AND DEMANDING INDIVIDUALS ARE EVERYDAY CHALLENGES
    (Martin, 2004)
    • EVERYONE, ALL GENERATIONS, MUST BE FLEXIBLE, TECHNO-SAVVY, AND KNOWLEDGEABLE
    • EVERYONE MUST BE FOCUSED ON GETTING A GREAT JOB DONE EVERYDAY
    • CONSIDER YOURSELF A FREE AGENT, YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR LIFE, CAREER, FAMILY, AND CONTRIBUTIONS
    (Martin, 2004)
    • TALK ABOUT YOUR DIFFERENCES
    • TRY TO DO THIS IN A FUN, UPBEAT WAY
    • DON’T BE DEMEANING OR UNRESPECTFUL
    • ASK QUESTIONS TO LEARN ABOUT THE OTHER GENERATIONS VALUES, BELIEFS, STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES
    • ASK WHAT THEY CAN TEACH YOU AND WHAT YOU CAN TEACH THEM
    (Martin, 2004)
    • IF ALL GENERATIONS WILL BE HONEST AND RESPECTFUL WHEN DISCUSSING DIFFERENCES, IT CAN BE A GREAT HELP TO LEARNING ABOUT EACH OTHER, FINDING OUT ABOUT WHAT IS MOST IMPORTANT TO EACH OTHER AND RECOGNIZING HOW ALL OF THE GENERATIONS CAN TEACH AND LEARN FROM EACH OTHER
    (Martin, 2004)
    • MAXIMIZE EVERYONE’S STRENGTHS
    • EVERY 3 MONTHS HOLD A STAFF MEETING WHERE EVERYONE CAN TALK ABOUT THESE TOPICS:
    • THEIR TALENTS, SKILLS, KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE
    • THE AREAS IN WHICH THEY NEED TO IMPROVE. THIS CREATES A TRUSTING ENVIRONMENT WHERE PEOPLE CAN ADMIT THEIR WEAKNESSES
    (Martin, 2004)
    • THEIR NEED FOR SUPPORT AND MENTORING IN THE AREAS IN WHICH THEY NEED TO IMPROVE. THIS WILL ENCOURAGE AN ATTITUDE OF ONGOING LEARNING. LET THEM KNOW THAT SUPPORT IS AVAILABLE, AND MAKE SURE THAT THEY RECEIVE THE HELP THAT THEY HAVE ASKED FOR.
    (Martin, 2004)
    • IF THESE THINGS ARE DONE, IT WILL BE MUCH EASIER FOR THE DIFFERENT GENERATIONS TO WORK COHESIVELY IN THE WORKPLACE
    • EVERYONE IS THERE FOR THE SAME REASON, TO BEST CARE FOR THE PATIENTS, IF YOU REALIZE THIS AND DO THE BEST JOB THAT YOU CAN, THE WORKPLACE IN RETURN WILL RECOGNIZE YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS AND REWARD YOU ACCORDINGLY
    (Martin, 2004)
  •  
    • Value the lessons of history regarding delivery of healthcare
    • Look to the past for insight into what has worked and what hasn’t
    • Respectful of authority, supportive of hierarchy, and disciplined in their work habits
    (Sherman, 2006) (Weston, 2006)
    • Many have either already left the workplace or have plans to do so within the next few years.
    • Given the physical demand of acute care, this working generation of nurses is unlikely to be in direct-care positions.
    • More likely to hold senior-level healthcare management and decision-making positions
    (Sherman, 2006) (Weston, 2006)
    • Support an ethos of institutional loyalty engendered by the belief that the commanded collective, rather than the impervious individual, accomplishes the task at hand.
    • They come from a time when rules, policies, and procedures were clearly laid out.
    • Achievement depended on employees who obeyed the rules and practiced healthcare within set parameters.
    (Sherman, 2006) (Weston, 2006)
    • Seasoned boomers are nurses in the workplace to whom upcoming generations will look to for mentoring, leadership, and professional nurturing.
    • They value lifelong learning as a way of improving their performance.
    • Currently occupy many nursing leadership positions
    • Their goal is to make a significant contribution to the healthcare system with their experience and expertise.
    (Sherman, 2006) (Weston, 2006)
    • Prefer an equal coaching environment in which they have opportunities to demonstrate their own expertise in the learning environment.
    • They don’t like to feel micromanaged.
    • They assume the responsibility to keep employment by constantly updating their skills.
    (Sherman, 2006) (Weston, 2006)
    • More likely to seek temporary more temporary partnerships, such as “free agent”, float pool, registry, or travel nurse where they have more control over their schedules
    • Their resourcefulness, independence, technical sophistication, and adaptability to change are increasing in the workplace
    • Focus is on outcome rather than processes.
    • More skilled in delivering cost effective care.
    • Have learned to incorporate technology into their delivery of health care.
    (Sherman, 2006) (Weston, 2006)
    • More affluent, hyper educated, ethnically diverse, and technologically accomplished than any previous generation.
    • Greater focus on deeply engaged and cooperative teamwork
    • Skilled in the use of technology as it relates to delivery of healthcare.
    • Naturally predisposed to multitasking.
    (Sherman, 2006) (Weston, 2006)
    • Parallel processing describes the way in which this generation processes information
    • Technology driven mode of thought correlates with the organization of data by computers, permitting faster processing and a greater absorption of information.
    (Sherman, 2006) (Weston, 2006)
    • While each generation may have different views and ways of delivering healthcare, they all function under one standard of care.
    • The Millennial Generation is often compared to the Veterans in their values and the way in which they deliver care.
    • Generation X and Millennial nurses want in their nursing leaders the characteristics of honesty, ability to motivate others, a positive outlook, and good communication skills, and approachable demeanor, knowledge, and support.
    (Sherman, 2006) (Weston, 2006)
  •  
    • Some being warmly welcomed in the nursing world with such shortages (Weston, 2006)
    • Some in conflict with senior nurses who stated they had to work harder due to shortages (Trossman , 2007)
    • Technology for the structural, functional, and intellectual aspects of their job is not a perk, it’s an expectation ( Sherman, 2006)
    • LEARN & TEACH Relationship (Trossman, 2007)
    • Millennials teach about technology
    • Veteran nurses teach through their experiences and expertise
    • You do not have to adopt colleagues’ values but recognize, allow, and respect the different values (Kupperschmidt, 2006)
    • “ The lungs and heart are still in the same place and the reason for going into nursing is the same - to provide compassionate patient care.” (Shoemaker from Four Generations of Nurses Working Side by Side, 2007)
  •  
    • Do your research:
        • Gain a better understanding of each generation’s motivators and learning styles.
    • Gain respect:
        • Be careful not to stereotype
        • Be sensitive to the differences that exist
        • Be open minded
        • Maintain eye contact
        • Be attentive
        • Be polite
    ( Lee, 2007)
    • Become a member of ANA
    • Attend seminars
      • Incorporate in staff meeting what you have learned from ANA, seminars etc., and ask for feedback.
    ( Lee, 2007)
    • Make a concerted effort to facilitate collaboration
      • Mentoring Program
        • Pairing less-experienced nurses with professional nurses
        • Helps bring new perspectives and approaches to initiatives
    ( Lee, 2007)
    • Boychuk Duchscher, J.E., & Cowin, L., (2004) Multigenerational Nurses in the Workplace. Jona , 34(11), 493-501.
    • Grossman, S. (2007) Talking’ ‘bout my generation. American Nurses Association: The American Nurse.
    • Kupperschmidt, B. (2006) Addressing Multigenerational Conflict: Mutual Respect and Carefronting as Strategy. Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 11(2), 14-14. Retrieved October 29, 2007, from Academic Search Complete database.
        • Lee, K.S. (2007). Managing a multi-generational workforce . Retrieved November 6, 2007, from http://www.cioupdate.com/career/article.php/3617631
    • Leighty, J. (2007) Four Generations of Nurses Working Side by Side . Retrieved November 8, 2007, from http://news.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070524/MEDSURG/305150019/1014/MedSurg.
    • Martin, C.A. (2004). Bridging the generation gap. Nursing2004 ,34(12), 62-63.
    • Sherman, R. (May 2006) Leading a Multigenerational Nursing Workforce: Issues, Challenges and Strategies. OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 11(2). Retrieved October 29, 2007 from www.nursingworld.org/ojin/topics.
  • Weston, M. (May 2006) Integrating Generational Perspectives in Nursing. OJIN The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 11(2).