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The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities
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The Livescribe Smartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities

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The Livescribe Smartpen is one of the best examples of the transformational impact that technology can have on learning strategies, academic outcomes, and student autonomy in higher education for all …

The Livescribe Smartpen is one of the best examples of the transformational impact that technology can have on learning strategies, academic outcomes, and student autonomy in higher education for all involved, in particular for students with disabilities. For the past year, through its Livescribe Pilot Program, the Office of Student Disability Services (SDS) at Lehman College has been training students with various disabilities to use the pen, and coaching them to develop new notetaking and review strategies. Multimedia Showcase attendees will have the opportunity to use the Livescribe Smartpen, become familiar with the SDS's program, and gain insight into ways Lehman's students with disabilities are able to attain academic success.

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  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4G3T7b8pKM&feature=fvw
  • Transcript

    • 1. The LivescribeSmartpen: The Impact of Intelligent Use of Technology on Academic Achievement for Students with Disabilities<br />Jill Roter, Assistant Director<br />Office of Student Disability Services, Lehman College <br />
    • 2. What Does the Livescribe Pen Do?<br />Links everything you hear to what you write<br />Replays the recording instantly when student taps pen tip on written notes<br />Access the Lecture ANYTIME<br />
    • 3. Integrating the Livescribe Pen<br /><ul><li>Classroom notetaking
    • 4. Meetings / fieldwork
    • 5. Talking / tactile docs
    • 6. Tutoring sessions
    • 7. Academic networking</li></li></ul><li>Livescribe’s Options <br />$99.95$149.95$249.95<br />200 hrs. recording time 400 hrs. recording time 800 hrs. recording time<br />
    • 8. The Pen and its Parts<br />
    • 9. Livescribe’s Free Desktop Software<br />
    • 10. Livescribe Connect (Sharing)<br />
    • 11. Students’ Responsibilities<br />Students must…<br />Commit to the SDS’s semester-long program <br />Participate in one-on-one training sessions<br />Provide ongoing informal feedback<br /> Provide formal feedback (survey) at 2 points in the semester<br />
    • 12. SDS’s Livescribe Pilot Program:The Learning Curve<br />Primary challenges learning to use the technology:<br /><ul><li>Students with visual impairments:
    • 13. Pen’s display is too small and not navigable; required magnifying glass to view
    • 14. Students with LD, TBI, and cognitive impairments:
    • 15. Determining best way to organize notes (LD)
    • 16. Multiple steps for optional online component (LD, TBI, cognitive impairment)
    • 17. Practice required to use its features successfully and remember steps (LD, TBI)
    • 18. Remembering to turn pen on (cognitive impairment)</li></li></ul><li>SDS’s Livescribe Pilot Program:Student Usage Strategies<br />New Approaches to Notetaking:<br /><ul><li>Use key words and sentences when taking class notes, and leave space to fill in info gaps during subsequent review of audio
    • 19. Create an outline with headings and subheadings as the lecture proceeds, and leave space to fill in info later on via audio review
    • 20. Jot down key words and sentences to create an indexed recording
    • 21. Write own notes while researching / studying and upload them to Livescribe Desktop for review / as backup to paper</li></li></ul><li>SDS’s Livescribe Pilot Program:Student Usage Strategies<br />New Approaches to Studying:<br /><ul><li>Work collaboratively with a study buddy: one person uses the pen and notebook to access the notes, while the other person uses the Livescribe Desktop software
    • 22. Listen to entire lecture and taking notes to fill in info gaps
    • 23. Listen to specific parts of the lecture by tapping or clicking (Desktop software) on keywords, and filling in specific info gaps
    • 24. Listen to specific parts of the lecture by tapping or clicking on keywords and filling in specific info gaps sometimes
    • 25. Listen to specific parts of the lecture by tapping on words in notes
    • 26. Listen to entire lecture and write a complete set of notes in a separate notebook
    • 27. Listen to audio while reading notes
    • 28. Listen to entire lecture</li></li></ul><li>SDS’s Livescribe Pilot Program:Facilitating Academic Success<br />Most Significant Changes to Notetaking Habits:<br /><ul><li>Less writing
    • 29. Anonymity: no need for a notetaker in the classroom; no one knows student has a disability
    • 30. Increased independence: if student misses something, no longer a need to rely on a peer, the prof., or their own notes Can go back to the exact spot in the recording
    • 31. Details notetaker missed are no longer an issue
    • 32. Access to a more complete set of notes than before
    • 33. More attentive listening than before
    • 34. Better retention and focus / better participation in class
    • 35. More organized: ability to create custom notebooks in the Livescribe Desktop
    • 36. Ability to upload notes to the computer</li></li></ul><li>SDS’s Livescribe Pilot Program:Facilitating Academic Success<br />Most Significant Changes to Study Habits:<br /><ul><li>Studying is more convenient, easier, and efficient overall
    • 37. Studying is more concentrated / can sit for longer periods without distraction—technology makes it fun
    • 38. Details previously overlooked now apparent, helping to improve performance, esp. on lecture-based exams
    • 39. Ability to review verbatim lecture either in total or in part and rewrite notes repetition, which was extremely helpful
    • 40. Ability to be more organized when studying/have more information to study from
    • 41. Ability to listen back to classes each week rather than trying to decipher sloppy handwriting
    • 42. Daily review, custom notebook creation for midterm and final review, creation of own study guides</li></li></ul><li>Diagnosis: Legally blind due to stroke<br />Major: Social Work<br />Age: 43<br />Sex: Female<br />Primary Academic Challenge: <br />Missing actual lecture due to concentrating too hard on notetaking<br />“I retain more information because I participate more. I can ask questions and not focus on writing so much. I can ask questions right then and there, and make it correspond with the lecture. I review daily enthusiastically whereas I did not before until it was exam time. I didn’t see another way to pass midterms; I have to attribute that to the pen.”<br />Student Profile: Visual Impairment<br />
    • 43. Student Profile: Cognitive Impairment (due to Chronic Illness)<br />Diagnosis: Multiple Sclerosis<br />Major: Community Health<br />Age: 43<br />Sex: Female<br />Primary Academic Challenge: Writing too slowly<br />“The pen is like a security blanket. When the professor begins to go too fast, I don’t get into a panic because the pen is recording and I can always go back. I let the pen do most of the work, and if I don’t get things while in class, I can listen to the information when the class is over.”<br />
    • 44. Student Profile: Learning Disorders (LD)<br />Diagnosis: Dyslexia, dyscalculia<br />Major: Therapeutic Recreation; minor in geriatric health<br />Age: 26<br />Sex: Male<br />Primary Academic Challenge: Not knowing what to write down (esp. in absence of board notes); missing important details (esp. in unstructured lecture)<br />“Now I have to write only key words; I have the recording to do the rest. It’s also more confidential, because you’re doing it yourself; there’s no one in the room that’s sitting next to you. The instructor might think that if you have someone in the classroom, that you’re lower than you are. I can now download my classes on to the computer and I am able to listen back to my classes every week instead of reading my sloppy handwriting.”<br />
    • 45. Student Profile: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)<br />Diagnosis: Traumatic Brain Injury <br />Major: Social Work<br />Age: 52<br />Sex: Male<br />Primary Academic Challenge: Trouble keeping up with prof. and re-reading own notes; remembering / recalling info<br />“I don’t have to write long hand. Sometimes it is difficult to keep up with the professor, so I just put the title, or the word. It gives me that recall that I’ve lost. When I need to remember something or expound on an idea, I just tap on the notebook and say, ‘oh, now I remember.’ With this, I know exactly what part of the conversation I want to remember, vs. a tape recorder.”<br />
    • 46. Student Profile: Hearing Impairment<br />Diagnosis: Hearing Impairment<br />Major: Speech Language Pathology<br />Age: 23<br />Sex: Female<br />Primary Academic Challenge: <br />Not hearing everything being said<br />“I would still miss things even when using a recorder. The combination of the notes and recorder bring it all together and help me review. It is the best technology that I have used for school. It helped me understand material that I didn’t understand in class because when I played the audio back, the recording helped me remember different examples the teacher gave.”<br />
    • 47. Contact Information<br />Jill Roter<br />Lehman College<br />Office of Student Disability Services<br />Shuster Hall, Rm. 238<br />250 Bedford Park Boulevard WestBronx, NY 10468<br />(718) 960-8441 or 1167<br />jill.roter@lehman.cuny.edu <br />

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