Fall 2012 lccc state of the college address
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Fall 2012 lccc state of the college address

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This presentation was created by Laramie County Community College President Joe Schaffer as part of his State of the College address on Aug. 15, 2012.

This presentation was created by Laramie County Community College President Joe Schaffer as part of his State of the College address on Aug. 15, 2012.

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Fall 2012 lccc state of the college address Fall 2012 lccc state of the college address Presentation Transcript

  • Fall 2012 State of the College Address August 15, 2012
  • Recap of the Past Seven MonthsEmphasis has focused on:• Meeting, Listening and Learning• Getting the Right People in the Right Places• Planning for Expanded and Improved Facilities• Institutional Stability
  • Enrollment
  • Enrollment Laramie County Community College Annualized Headcount Enrollment by Location, 2001-2002 to 2011-2012 4,000 3,500 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 Albany County Campus Cheyenne Campus Concurrent Enrollment Distance Learning Courses Outreach Sites Source: Colleague Records LCCC IR Office, 07/19/2012
  • Enrollment Laramie County Community College Annualized FTE Enrollment by Location, 2001-2002 to 2011-2012 3,000.00 2,500.00 2,000.00 1,500.00 1,000.00 500.00 0.00 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 Albany County Campus Cheyenne Campus Concurrent Enrollment Distance Learning Courses Outreach Sites Source: Colleague Records LCCC IR Office, 07/19/2012
  • Enrollment Fall 2012 Enrollment Data Four weeks before class start Point-to-Point Report for monitoring purposes only Fall 11 Fall 12 5-Aug-11 3-Aug-12 Difference %Change Student Enrollment Level Full-Time 2071 1893 -178 -8.6% Part-Time 1937 2013 76 3.9% Student Program Type Academic Transfer 1931 1768 -163 -8.4% Occupational Technical 1270 1315 45 3.5% Undeclared 807 823 16 2.0% Enrollment By Age Difference % Change Traditional (< 24) 2057 1972 -85 -4.1% Adult (25 & Over) 1948 1930 -18 -0.9%
  • Average education and related spending per FTE student at public community colleges by state, 2009 Budget: Funding Net tuition portion of E&R Average subsidy portion of E&R Student share of costs & Spending Wyoming WI AK UT WY OR $3,471 $2,077 $2,903 $1,853 $3,883 $11,600 $11,811 $9,643 14% 30% $13,853 22% $14,452 13% 21% HI $2,338 $11,087 19% ID $3,653 $9,635 36% Total number of students enrolled at CT $3,651 $9,435 28% Average education and related spending per FTE student in Wyoming, public and private postsecondary MD $4,342 $8,276 35% 2004 and 2009 institutions: NC $1,710 $10,726 14% $20,000 Ed ucation an d related spending p er FTE (in 2009 $) ME $3,519 $8,905 32% $18,000 Wyoming: 35,961 MT $4,209 $8,145 36% United States: 19,440,553 $16,000 ND $4,252 $7,076 38% Wyoming Continues to Invest KS $2,600 $8,581 24% $14,000 Percentage of students enrolled in public institutions: MN $5,389 $5,775 49% $12,000 $14,021 AL $2,854 $8,287 28% $10,000 $10,949 Wyoming: 96% DE $4,910 $6,113 45% $8,000 $6,000 $4,000 in Community Colleges! $9,936 $11,811 United States: 72% Distribution of enrollments at public institutions: NH SD NY NE $6,321 $5,519 $4,109 $2,366 $4,554 $5,223 $6,626 $8,262 59% 54% 39% 23% WY U.S. $2,000 $0 $4,141 2004 $4,310 2009 LCCC: $31.5 Million in FY13 $1,903 2004 $1,853 2009 Research: Master’s: 35% n/a 30% 19% MA MI SC IA $4,563 $4,088 $5,289 $3,819 $6,056 $6,472 $5,105 $6,508 52% 38% 45% 40% Bachelor’s: n/a 3% WA $2,826 $7,466 28% Public Research Community Colleges Community U.S. $3,118 $7,124 32% National Average Net tuition Average subsidy Colleges: 65% 48% LA $3,046 $7,017 31% NM $1,786 $8,255 17% GA $3,052 $6,950 32% PA $4,783 $5,193 49% FL $2,894 $7,025 31%Average education and related costs per FTE student, student share, instruction share, and performance CO $5,708 $4,002 67% Wyoming United States AR $2,557 $6,995 29% Public Public Public Community Public Public Public Community AZ $2,463 $6,949 28% Research Masters Bachelors Colleges Research Masters Bachelors Colleges OH $5,156 $4,114 57%Education and related costs per FTE student TX $2,758 $6,404 32% NV $2,458 $6,700 28%2009 $18,331 n/a n/a $13,664 $15,919 $12,363 $13,235 $10,242 RI $4,053 $4,865 45%C g rm0 0 h eo 24 0 a f n 0- 9 2 21% n/a n/a 15% 12% 9% 8% 7% MS $1,893 $6,778 22%Net tuition share of education and related costs MO $3,278 $5,246 40%2009 24% n/a n/a 14% 52% 49% 44% 32% CA $1,025 $7,338 13%P e g o c n fo 24 0 e n e i t h g rm0 0 r t - n ae c ap 0- 9 2 -3 n/a n/a -2 3 4 3 2 VA $2,962 $5,346 37% TN $3,604 $4,459 45%Instruction share of education and related costs IL $2,535 $5,526 32%2009 63% n/a n/a 47% 62% 51% 48% 50% VT $7,386 $509 94%P e g o c n fo 24 0 e n e i t h g rm0 0 r t - n ae c ap 0- 9 2 -2 n/a n/a 1 -1 -1 -1 -1 WV $2,206 $5,685 32% OK $2,432 $5,354 32%Completions per 100 FTE students KY $1,599 $6,175 21%2009 24 n/a n/a 22 25 24 20 26 NJ $4,376 $3,394 58%C g rm0 0 h eo 24 0 a f n 0- 9 2 2 n/a n/a 0 1 1 1 1 IN $3,550 $3,026 54%Education and related spending per completion $0 $4,000 $8,000 $12,000 $16,000 $20,0002009 $77,756 n/a n/a $62,999 $64,179 $54,167 $68,393 $46,759C g rm0 0h eo 24 0 a f n 0- 9 2 13% n/a n/a 9% 8% 4% 2% -2% Average education and related expenses (E&R) per FTE student
  • Budget: Funding & Spending Comparative Expenditures per Student FTE (p. 10) FY07 - FY11 10,460.05 10,329.80 9,933.91 9,474.75 8,960.99 9,048.04 9,334.69 8,985.98 8,943.84 8,074.30 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 LCCC Average WY CC Source: Wyoming Community College Commission
  • Budget: Funding & Spending State & Local Funding per FTE (FY11) $8,638 $8,196 $7,853 $7,949 $7,649 $6,412 $6,311 Casper Central WY Eastern WY LCCC Northern WY Northwest Western WY College College College College College College Source: Wyoming Community College Commission
  • Budget: Funding & Spending Wyoming CC Resident Tuition & Fees 2011/2012 $2,500 $2,000 $576 $840 $608 $598 $432 $504 $438 $1,500 Fees Tuition $1,000 $1,704 $1,704 $1,704 $1,704 $1,704 $1,704 $1,704 $500 $0 Casper Central WY Eastern WY LCCC Northwest Northern Western WY College College College College WY College College Source: Wyoming Community College Commission Source: Wyoming Community College Commission
  • Budget: Funding & Spending Core Expenses per FTE by Function (FY10) $6,000 $5,000 $4,000 $3,000 $2,000 $1,000 $0 Instruction Public Service Academic Support Institutional Student Services Other Core Support Expenses LCCC Peers Source: NCES IPEDS 2011 Data Feedback Report
  • Budget: Funding & Spending Comparative Expenditures per FTE, by Program (FY11) 4,500.00 4,000.00 3,500.00 3,000.00 2,500.00 2,000.00 1,500.00 1,000.00 500.00 - Instruction Public Service Academic Student Institutional Plant Scholarships Support Services Support Operations LCCC Average WY CC Source: Wyoming Community College Commission
  • Budget: Funding & Spending• FY13 Investments FY13 General Fund Expenditures $18,742,492 by Program – Instruction • $897,000 Investment • $500,00 in Full-Time Faculty • 6.2% increase from FY12 – Institutional Support $7,959,226 • $171,000 in Human Resources $5,360,181 • $175,000 for Facilities Planning $4,759,055 $3,803,890 • $300,000 to Strengthen Foundation $2,062,400 • 9.5% Increase from FY12 $301,333 – Flexibility for Budget Cuts • $426,000 in Operating Reserve • $663,000 in One-Time-Only Spending Source: LCCC FY13 Annual Budget
  • Facilities • Campus Master Plan: Significant Space Deficiencies at LCCC – Cheyenne Campus (10% Enrollment Growth through 2020) • Need an additional 155,722 Gross Square Feet (GSF) • Current Need = 40,000 GSF • 44,672 GSF for Academic Space • 29,118 GSF for Academic Support Space • 81,931 GSF of Auxiliary Space • Greatest needs areas: Assembly & Exhibit, Office, Student Center, PE/Rec/Athletics, Housing – Albany County Campus (10% Enrollment Growth through 2020) • Need an additional 54,125 GSF; Current Need = 17,000 GSF • 16,000 GSF for Academic Space • 3,550 GSF for Academic Support • 2,320 GSF of Auxiliary Space • Greatest needs areas: Classrooms & Service, Teaching Labs, Offices, Library, Physical Plant, Student CenterSource: LCCC Campus Master Plan
  • Facilities “Building Forward” Aggressive Eight-Year Facilities Plan 1. University/Student Center 2. Flex Tech Building 3. Residence Halls 4. Performing and Fine Arts Building 5. Albany County Campus Expansion @ UW 6. Campus Face-Lift
  • Student Success Developmental Education, Success and Persistence LCCC Entering Students Fall 2008 - Fall 2011 Average 80% 73% 70% 70% 68% 63% 64% 58% 60% 55% 53% 50% 48% 50% 47% 39% 40% 30% 20% 20% 15% 16% 10% 0% Enrolled in Dev Ed 1st Term Success in Dev Ed Earn No College Credits Fall-Spring Persistence Fall-Fall Persistence Traditional Adult All StudentsSource: Colleague Records, LCCC IR Office 8/8/2012
  • *Calculated using Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010 Cohorts Student Success only due to time necessary to complete two years of coursework. **Calculated using Fall 2008, and Fall 2009 Cohorts only due to time necessary to complete. Progression and Completion LCCC Entering Students Fall 2008 - Fall 2011 Average 90% 78% 80% 68% 70% 68% 70% 60% 50% 46% 40% 28% 27% 29% 27% 30% 20% 18% 20% 15% 17% 13% 10% 6% 0% 1st Term Success College-Level Math In 1 Year 15 Credits in 1 Year 30 Credits in 2 Years* Completion in 3 Years** Traditional Adult All StudentsSource: Colleague Records, LCCC IR Office 8/8/2012
  • Student Success *Calculated using Fall 2008 and Fall 2009 Cohorts only due to time necessary to complete.Persistence & Completion by Program Type LCCC Entering Students Fall 2008 - Fall 2011 Average90% 81%80% 69%70%60% 53% 48%50%40% 31%30% 27% 18% 18%20% 13% 15% 8%10% 4% 0% Fall-Spring Persistence Fall-Fall Persistence College-Level Math In 1 Year Completion in 3 Years* Applied (AAS/Cert) Transfer (AA/AS) Gen Ed (Undeclared)Source: Colleague Records, LCCC IR Office 8/8/2012
  • Student Success • Getting from Undeclared to Declared, ASAP – The sooner students choose a program of study, the more likely they are to persist to goal attainment (Jenkins 2011). % of Undeclared Entering Students who Choose a Program of Study by the End of Their First Year (Fall 2008-2011 4-Year Average) 25.0% 20.0% 15.0% 10.0% 6.1% 6.2% 5.0% 2.6% 0.0% All Entering Students Traditional Age Adult Students Source: Colleague Records, LCCC IR Office 8/8/2012Jenkins, D. (2011). Get with the program: Accelerating community college students’ entry into and completion ofprograms of study (CCRC Working Paper No. 32). New York, NY: Columbia University, Teachers College, CommunityCollege Research Center.
  • Student Success • At the Foundational Level – the Classroom % of Entering Students Successful Course Completions in First Term (Fall 2008-2011 4-Year Average) 77.8% 70.6% 70.0% 68.3% 68.0% 57.8% All Courses Developmental College-Level Traditonal Students Adult Students State Benchmark* Courses Courses Source: Colleague Records, LCCC IR Office 8/8/2012*National Community College Benchmark Project median (2009median as floor; i.e., 105% X 74.13% = 77.84%)
  • Institutional Transformation • The Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence in Education* 1. Leadership 2. Strategic Planning 3. Customer Focus 4. Measurement, Analysis, and Knowledge Management 5. Workforce Focus 6. Operations Focus 7. Results* Available at: http://www.nist.gov/baldrige/publications/education_criteria.cfm
  • Institutional Transformation • Winning by Degree’s Essential Elements of High Performance Institutions of Higher Education* 1. Efficient and effective operational processes supported by appropriate technology and tools. 2. Effective management systems to ensure progress, build capabilities, and manage implementation. 3. Leaders and staff who are committed to achieving degree productivity gains alongside high-quality educational outcomes. 4. Support from state and institutional policies that allow them to choose how to achieve their quality and efficiency goals.*Auguste, B. G., Cota, A., Jayaram, K., and Laboissière, M. C. A. (2010).Winning by degrees: The strategies of highly productive higher education institutions.New York, NY: McKinsey & Company.
  • Institutional Transformation • Achieving the Dream’s Principles of Institutional Effectiveness* 1. Committed Leadership - Senior college leaders actively support efforts to improve student success, not just to increase enrollments 2. Use of Evidence to Improve Programs and Services 3. Broad Engagement - Faculty, student services staff, and administrators share responsibility for student success. 4. Systemic Institutional Improvement - The college establishes planning processes that rely on data to set goals for student success and then uses the data to measure goal attainment* Available at: http://www.achievingthedream.org/institutional_change/four_principles
  • Institutional Transformation • CCRC’s Practices of Effective Organizations* 1. Leadership – committed to improving outcomes 2. Focus on the Customer 3. Functional Alignment – “Instructional Program Coherence” 4. Process Improvement 5. Use of Measurement 6. Employee Involvement & Professional Development 7. External Linkages*Jenkins, D. (2011). Redesigning community colleges for completion: Lessons fromresearch on high-performance organizations. New York, NY:Columbia University, Teachers College, Community College Research Center.
  • Institutional Transformation• Commonality across these: – Strong, committed leadership focused on outcomes – Strong “customer focus” – centered on the student – Emphasis on our workforce, through professional development and broad- based inclusion – Effective and efficient organizational processes (e.g., planning & assessment) – Commitment to setting goals – Using data and measurement to evaluate progress and inform decisions
  • Institutional Transformation• Progress at LCCC – Reorganization Starting with the Leadership – Building Inclusiveness through Shared Governance – Defining and Measuring Institutional Performance (KPI’s) – Change in Board Governance = Strengthened Policies & Procedures – Much more to come…
  • The Completion Agenda• Resolving the Discourse – It isn’t that the US is doing so much worse, just that other countries are doing so much better… – Increase has happened as a result of improved access; completion rates have slipped, while time to degree and costs have increased.
  • The Completion Agenda• Resolving the Discourse – Completion is not a bad word. Earning a degree or certificate is still the primary reason students go to college. • 96% of Community College students expect to earn an Associate’s Degree or Higher (U.S. Department of Education’s Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study 1996-2001). • 79% of Community College students indicate their goal for attending is to earn an associate degree (Center for Community College Student Engagement’s A Matter of Degrees 2012; 2010 SENSE Cohort Data, n=70,138). – It’s Completion AND Quality, Not Completion versus Quality • We must keep the quality and rigor within our academic offerings. • However, we must find new ways to support students in the learning process.
  • The Completion Agenda• Distilling the Noise – Complete College America, Achieving the Dream, Access to Success, Lumina, CCSSE, WICHE, ACE, Completion Arch, American Graduation Initiative, etc…. – Common Elements 1. Assess Student Learning - Instructional Effectiveness, Course Redesign and Enhancement 2. Reform Developmental Education and Placement Assessment 3. Align Curricula and Construct Coherent Pathways to Credentials and Transfer 4. Integrate Student Services and Strengthen Non-Academic Supports 5. Remove Barriers, Simplify Structures, and Improve Policy and Procedures (Colleges & Students) 6. Incentivize and Monitor Progress and Completion (Colleges & Students) 7. Collect and Use Data to Monitor Progress and Inform Continuous Improvement Processes 8. Develop and Engage the Faculty and Staff Collaboratively to Tackle Change
  • Building Momentum1. Focusing on Academic Excellence – Design & Implement a Framework for Assessing Student Learning: At the course, program, and institution levels. – Re-examine and Refine our General Education Core: Tied to institutional learning outcomes and recognized by a credential. – Improve Overall Student Success in Coursework: Focus first on the courses with the lowest success rates. – Strengthen and Expand Programming through Innovation and Responsiveness to Community and Student Needs: Flexible scheduling, coherent pathways, and utilization of different delivery modalities. – Develop the Faculty: Establish a center for teaching and learning, focusing on new faculty development and ongoing instructional improvement. – Empower the Faculty: Place the authority and responsibility over the Academy and our curricula more strongly in Faculty hands.
  • Building Momentum2. Services and Programs to Serve Our Students – Establish a Centralized, Holistic Model for Student Advising: Advising needs to be much more than course planning. – Create Early Connections for Students Through Mandatory Engagement: “Students don’t do optional” (Kay McClenney, CCCSE). • Mandatory New Student Orientation w/Registration • Mandatory Student Success Course/Freshman Seminar for All Incoming Students – Improve the “Front Door Experience” at LCCC: Efficient, accurate information focused on the student. – Plan for the Implementation of Integrated Services and a Student Services “One Stop.” – Strengthen Student Engagement: Expand opportunities for student involvement outside of the classroom.
  • Building Momentum3. Stabilize and Strengthen the College – Bolster Shared Governance Through Effective Operations: • Establish integrated models for institutional planning and an improved budget process, driven by an open and honest assessment of institutional efficacy. • Process map major organizational processes to identify areas for improvement in campus involvement and process effectiveness. – Assist the Board in Changes in Governance Model: Trustee’s Governance and Policy = Our Procedures. – Engage the Campus and Community in Aggressively Pursuing Our Facilities Plan: To meet our needs will require the support of all. – Match Form to Function Through the Next Phases of Reorganization. – Establish a Strong, Centralized Human Resources Structure. – Seek Out Efficiencies Across the Institution. • Objective and actionable program review • Examine student fee structure and financial subsidy strategy
  • What is the State of LCCC?LCCC is Building Momentum and Poised for a Great Year and an Even Greater Future!