Digital spice route

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Navigating the Digital Spice Route - 10 experience principles to bridge European user experiences with the rest of the world. The growth of the Internet has been expanding rapidly, breaching new audiences with their own unique customs, languages, and practices. Are we prepared to cater to the 3 billion or so new users logging online? Using the Internet as a digital spice route to connect to these new markets, we will consider key experience principles when creating websites, mobile experiences etc when catering to these audiences on a global scale.

With increasing demand from eastern markets, we need to revaluate how we create digital experiences that not only appeal to western channels but to also accommodates eastern audiences.

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  • Spice route – trade route via the seaSilk route – trade route via the land
  • 3 billion of online users in the eastern market taking Middle east, India and China into account. 750 millions of internet users in China by 2015 according to the Mckinsey consulting report in Feb 2011 – Digital consumer behaviours in China. 333 millions of mobile users by 2012, and that is 100 millions growth from Feb to 2012.
  • Left top and bottom are Saudi Arabian, collar differentiates them from others in the Gulf area.
  • Figure out which part of China is the target demographic group.
  • Arabic version is not difficult to build – fluid grid, flexible layout. Also some CMS like Day now support mirroring function with some degree of CSS tweak
  • It is not that difficult to implement, take the spice as an analogy:Getting the right mix of discipline together with local experts. Adapt and adjust to the local technological and media needs.Tailor the local offerings, pick and choose what is acceptable locally, identify and focus where you want to take them to the next level. Quantity of the mix makes a huge difference in terms of success or failureUsing the right colour combination Trial & error is part of the continuous improvement process that makes things perfect. Pay attention to the detail and refine it as it goes along.
  • Digital spice route

    1. 1.
    2. 2. Navigating the digital spice route<br />Terry MaLBi London Euro IA VII 23 Sept2011<br />
    3. 3. What is the spice route?<br />
    4. 4. 13th century spice route<br />13th century spice route<br />
    5. 5. The old challenges<br />Distance<br />Means of travel<br />Silk, spices, drugs and human trafficking<br />Language <br />Communication<br />Conflicts<br />Show me the money<br />
    6. 6. 21st century digital spice route<br />
    7. 7. Fast forward 800 years >>><br />Distance closer than ever<br />Means of travel faster and easier<br />Silk, spice, drugs and human trafficking still happen <br />Information – the NEW medium! <br />Language still an issue<br />Communication still a challenge<br />Conflicts still an issue<br />Show me the money everyone still wants it<br />
    8. 8. Experience principles<br />
    9. 9. Work with local knowledge<br />One size doesn’t fit all<br />Respect is a different concept in the East<br />Prepare for the language barrier<br />Deliver a sense of status and prestige <br />Consider various communication mediums and interactions<br />Understand their technological behaviours and habits<br />Be sensitive towards the country’s values<br />9. Tailor to the local markets<br />10. Be genuine<br />Ten experience principles<br />
    10. 10. 1. Work with local knowledge<br />
    11. 11. Capture audience insights<br />Use local market experts to conduct user research<br />Always check with local diplomats / staff to sense check the use of imageries and translations. <br />Check out local newspapers and magazines to understand the local cultures<br />Warning! Beware of information taken from the internet<br />
    12. 12.
    13. 13.
    14. 14. 2. One size doesn’t fit all<br />
    15. 15. Catered to multiple demographics<br />China<br />Tier 1 - Beijing – 22 millions, Shanghai – 23 millions, Guangzhou -15 millions<br />Tier 2 - Secondary provincial capitals (consist of 23 cities) including Chengdu, Dalian, Nanjing, Qingdao, Shenzhen, Suzhou, Tianjin<br />Tier 3 - Prefecture or county level city capitals<br />
    16. 16. Catered to multiple demographics<br />Eastern and western side of Saudi Arabia<br />Dhahran – the west, the richer side, the headquarter of Saudi Aramco<br />Jeddah – the east, the poorer side, its further away from the oil<br />
    17. 17. 3. Respect is a different concept in the East<br />
    18. 18. Know your role in client engagements<br />Do not assume everyone do businesses the same way as Europeans do<br />Transaction oriented – Western<br />Relationship oriented – Chinese<br />Hierarchy oriented – Middle East<br />
    19. 19. Give face<br />HSBC cultural sensitive communications ad<br />
    20. 20. 4. Prepare for the language barrier<br />4. Prepare for the language barrier<br />
    21. 21. Do you speak Chinese?<br />Different dialect<br />Cantonese? Mandarin? <br />Traditional vs simplified<br />Traditional Chinese <br />雞蛋<br />Cantonese<br />雞蛋<br />(gai1 daan2)<br />Simplified Chinese<br />鸡蛋<br />Mandarin<br />鸡蛋<br />(jīdàn)<br />
    22. 22. Typography<br />“Arabic typography is half Arabic and half typography. It is not possible to separate letterforms from the reality in which they will appear. To understand Arabic typography is to understand first what is Arabic.”Nadine Chahine, type designer and Arabic specialist for Linotype GmbH<br />
    23. 23. Typography<br />Line length<br />Sizing<br />Arabic<br />Non-web friendly fonts – only browsers that support CSS3 styling can render them<br />Chinese<br />text is laid out on a regular two-dimensional grid<br />monospaced<br />each character is centred at its own box<br />allow 200% extra line height<br />
    24. 24.
    25. 25.
    26. 26. Localised content<br />UK version<br />China version<br />
    27. 27. Layout<br />Arabic version<br />English version<br />
    28. 28.
    29. 29. 5. Deliver a sense of prestige and status<br />
    30. 30. Pay attention to the visual language<br />Imagery choice<br />Content / copy, tone of voice<br />Information architecture layout<br />Colours in culture<br />Chinese – Red represents good luck and celebrations<br />Gulf – obsession with gold<br />
    31. 31. http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/colours-in-cultures/<br />
    32. 32. 6. Consider various communication mediums and interactions<br />
    33. 33. Social entertainment<br />RenRen social network site<br />
    34. 34. Flash is still the key medium<br />
    35. 35. Flash is still the key medium<br />
    36. 36. Flash is still the key medium<br />
    37. 37. Flash is still the key medium<br />
    38. 38. Designing for clicks<br />
    39. 39. Form a dialogue with the audience<br />Word of mouth<br />Make use of the social media<br />
    40. 40.
    41. 41. Form a dialogue with the audience<br />Word of mouth<br />Make use of the social media<br />Local celebrity endorsement<br />
    42. 42.
    43. 43. 7. Understand their technological behaviours and habits<br />
    44. 44. Use the right platform<br />Accommodate mobile as the main stream platform<br />Mobile vs. desktop / laptops <br />Take connection speed into account<br />Superfast speed in Japan and Korea<br />Snail speed in parts of China and India<br />Broadband (max speed 20MB) unjustifiably expensive in Saudi Arabia<br />Identify consumer payment preferences<br />Credit card vsAlipay in China<br />E-commerce shop vsTaobao in China<br />
    45. 45. Use the right platform<br />
    46. 46.
    47. 47.
    48. 48. 8. Be sensitive towards the country’s values<br />
    49. 49. Censorship and privacy<br />Utilise the power of social media<br />Uprising in the middle east - Facebook and twitter<br />Take censorship seriously<br />YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and Flickr are all blocked in China<br />Baidu blocks pornography or references to topics such as Taiwanese independence, the Dalai Lama, and the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre. <br />Blogging in Saudi Arabia requires a licence<br />
    50. 50. Extra caution with imagery selection<br />Imagery of women (Middle East)<br />Islamic dress code<br />Well dressed according to religion<br />Rule of thumb – Be respectful – no exotic dancers or naked woman<br />Prohibited content<br />Alcohol – drunk, served or in the background<br />Gambling – Islam prohibits playing or even being there<br />Photo of intimacy<br />When in doubt always replace image of people with images of scenery.<br />Ensure people wearing national dress correctly<br />Mixed couple imagery – always portrait as family<br />Best to keep females and male images separated<br />
    51. 51. Extra caution with imagery selection<br />Sexual and political sensitive images (China)<br />Pornography<br />the Dalai Lama<br />1989 Tiananmen Square massacre<br />
    52. 52. 9. Tailor to the local markets<br />
    53. 53. Imitation vs. innovation<br />Competition from the local markets<br />Grass root user centre design in China – Shanzhai (山寨)<br />
    54. 54. BaiGooHoo<br />
    55. 55. Obama Blockberry<br />
    56. 56. Converse 2 in 1<br />
    57. 57. Multi brand trainers<br />
    58. 58. Local Rolls Royce<br />
    59. 59. Imitation vs. innovation<br />Successfully emerge to become global brands by enhancing experience, functionality and quality<br />ZTE – 4th largest mobile manufacturer in the world<br />“We are good at customisation, according to different cultures and customs. We can differentiate”<br />LG, Samsung, Tsingtao, Lenovo, Haier<br />
    60. 60. Asia global brands<br />
    61. 61. Tesco shuttle in Beijing<br />
    62. 62. 10. Be genuine<br />
    63. 63. Pole dancing in Saudi Arabia<br />
    64. 64. Maintain your own identity<br />Maintain own brand offerings but localise product offerings<br />Nike<br />Coke-cola <br />
    65. 65. Nike China Campaign<br />
    66. 66. Coke Beijing Ad Campaign<br />
    67. 67. Recap<br />
    68. 68. Digital spice route<br />13th century spice route<br />
    69. 69. Work with local knowledge<br />One size doesn’t fit all<br />Respect is a different concept in the East<br />Prepare for the language barrier<br />Deliver a sense of status and prestige <br />Consider various communication mediums and interactions<br />Understand their technological behaviours and habits<br />Be sensitive towards the country’s values<br />9. Tailor to the local markets<br />10. Be genuine<br />Ten experience principles<br />
    70. 70. Recap<br />The digital spice route recipe<br /><ul><li>Blending
    71. 71. Pick & Mix
    72. 72. Intensity
    73. 73. Cultural colour palette
    74. 74. Trial & error</li></li></ul><li>Terry Materry.ma@lbi.comLead User Experience Architect, LBi London<br /> Download: http://www.slideshare.net/terryhma/<br />Special thanks to Matthew Ma, Serena Ma, Eugenia Chan, Lorraine Wong & LBi London UX team<br />Thank you <br />

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