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Canadian LNG Exports Multistakeholder Collaboration Initiative 2014
Canadian LNG Exports Multistakeholder Collaboration Initiative 2014
Canadian LNG Exports Multistakeholder Collaboration Initiative 2014
Canadian LNG Exports Multistakeholder Collaboration Initiative 2014
Canadian LNG Exports Multistakeholder Collaboration Initiative 2014
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Canadian LNG Exports Multistakeholder Collaboration Initiative 2014

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With the current glut of natural gas in Canada due to increases in shale gas production and disappearing demand from the U.S.A., it is now pivotal for the entire Canadian natural gas industry that …

With the current glut of natural gas in Canada due to increases in shale gas production and disappearing demand from the U.S.A., it is now pivotal for the entire Canadian natural gas industry that they establish LNG export infrastructure to reach new Asian markets such as Japan, China and India. However, although seven LNG export terminals have now already received government approval, many obstacles still lie in the way of the creation of a globally competitive LNG export industry in Canada.

For the industry to get off the ground, Canadian LNG terminal developers need to collaborate with regulators to establish a fertile fiscal framework to attract buyers, work with First Nations to create mutually beneficial solutions for establishing pipeline infrastructure and, crucially, find Asian buyers who are willing to enter into long term contracts. With rival projects being developed in the U.S., Australia and Qatar, these obstacles need to be overcome urgently before the opportunity is missed.

To address these challenges, the Canadian LNG Exports: Multi-Stakeholder Collaboration Initiative 2014 will be the first Canadian-specific platform connecting Canadian LNG Terminal developers and regulators with Asian buyers from Japan, China and India and key First Nations groups to find practical solutions for collaborating to establish a globally competitive LNG export industry in Canada. Held on the 18th and 19th of June.

The event will provide a 360 degree view from each stakeholder group on what they are doing to speed up the development of the Canadian LNG export industry and what they need from the other stakeholders in order to move forward, with the practical output of laying the foundations for the new wave of national and international partnerships that will push the industry forward.

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  • 1. The Only Canada Specific Event To Feature Perspectives From LNG Buyers, Sellers, Regulators & First Nations In One Place SAVE $400 Register By Friday March 28, 2014 June 18-19, 2014 | Vancouver | Canada Examining Strategies For LNG Terminal & Pipeline Developers To Collaborate With Regulators, First Nations & Asian Buyers To Establish A Globally Competitive Canadian LNG Export Industry Before The Opportunity Is Missed Key Issues To Be Discussed Include: 20+ Expert Speakers Including: • ASIAN BUYER PERSPECTIVES: For the very first time key Asian buyers of LNG including PetroChina and Indian Oil will be talking specifically about their readiness to enter into long term contracts and provide forecasts on projected prices and netbacks for Canadian LNG exports to Asia • FRESH UPDATES ON TERMINAL TIMINGS: Key terminal developers such as Shell and Kitsault Energy will deliver fresh updates on the timescales and volumes of supply of proposed LNG export terminals • A FULL RANGE OF REGULATOR PERSPECTIVES: Regulators from all the key government departments both Federally and in B.C. will provide perspectives on how each department plans to support the growth of the LNG industry in Canada • PRACTICAL FIRST NATIONS PERSPECTIVES : Due to the specific focus on partnerships and stakeholder collaboration at this event, all First Nation presentations will be focused on practical solutions for establishing the requisite First Nation support for getting the industry off the ground • BRAND NEW LNG PIPELINE UPDATES: Gaining insight into the progress being made in establishing pipelines to feed LNG export terminals in Canada • SOLUTIONS FOR OVERCOMING SKILLED LABOR SHORTAGES: Evaluating industry and government strategies for securing the skilled labor necessary to deliver Canadian LNG terminal and pipeline infrastructure on time • DETAILED ANALYSIS ON AVAILABILITY OF SHIPS & PORTS: Examining solutions for securing the shipping and port capacity to take Canadian LNG exports to market Organized by: M Follow us @UnconventOilGas Susannah Pierce General Manager - LNG Canada Shell Krishnan Suthanthiran President Kitsault Energy Keo Lukefahr General Manager for Natural Gas PetroChina V. P. Sinha General Manager (LNG) Indian Oil Corporation Ron Brintnell Vice President B.C. LNG Initiative Enbridge Robert Metcs Chief Negotiator First Nations Pacific Trail Pipelines Group Limited Partnership Tim Meisner Director General Marine Policy Transport Canada Karen Ogen BSW, MSW Chief Wet’suwet’en First Nation www.lng-exports-canada-2014.com
  • 2. SAVE $400 Register By Friday March 28, 2014 With the current glut of natural gas in Canada due to It will be the first ever Canada-specific LNG exports event increases in shale gas production and disappearing to deliver: demand from the U.S.A., it is now pivotal for the entire • CANADIAN-FOCUSED ASIAN LNG BUYERS: All the Canadian natural gas industry that they establish LNG Asian buyers at this event from China, Japan and India export infrastructure to reach new Asian markets such as have been pre-screened to ensure that they have LNG Japan, China and India. However, although seven LNG procurement plans specific to Canada. export terminals have now already received government approval, many obstacles still lie in the way of the creation of a globally competitive LNG export industry in Canada. • SPECIFICS ON LONG TERM CONTRACTS & PRICING: For the very first time key Asian buyers will be talking specifically about their readiness to enter into For the industry to get off the ground, Canadian LNG long term contracts and provide forecasts on projected terminal developers need to collaborate with regulators to prices and netbacks for Canadian LNG exports to Asia. establish a fertile fiscal framework to attract buyers, work with First Nations to create mutually beneficial solutions for establishing pipeline infrastructure and, crucially, find Asian buyers who are willing to enter into long term contracts. • A FOCUS ON COLLABORATION WITH VIEWS FROM EVERY KEY STAKEHOLDER: This is not just a general conference on LNG exports in Canada, but will focus for the first time on solutions for collaboration To address these challenges, the Canadian LNG Exports between all the key stakeholders with a view for laying Multistakeholders Collaboration Initiative 2014 will be the groundwork for the new partnerships necessary to the first Canadian-specific platform connecting Canadian push the industry forward. For the first time attendees LNG Terminal developers and regulators with will hear perspectives from LNG terminal developers, Asian buyers from Japan, China and India and key regulators, Asian buyers, First Nations and pipeline First Nations groups to find practical solutions for developers all in one place at the same time focusing on collaborating to establish a globally competitive LNG how they can work together to speed up the growth of export industry in Canada. the Canadian LNG export industry. Testimonials Venue Information: “I was impressed by the topics of The Summit Will Be Held In: the event. They were very good” Vancouver, B.C. Kitsault Energy, Director LNG Email: philip.brown@lbcg.com for full venue details “Conference was well conceived in content and timely in its focus items.” Chevron www.lng-exports-canada-2014.com (1) 800 721 3915 info@canadian-business-conferences.com
  • 3. Day 1 Wednesday June 18, 2014 GETTING THE KEY STAKEHOLDERS ON BOARD: Examining The Strategies Of Regulators, Asian Buyers And First Nations For Supporting The Development Of A Globally Competitive Canadian LNG Export Industry 8.30 Chair’s Opening Remarks ASIAN MARKETS FOCUS FIRST NATIONS: ECONOMIC BENEFITS KEYNOTE MULTISTAKEHOLDER COLLABORATION PANEL 11.20 Quantifying The Volume & Specifications Of Demand For LNG In Asia & How The Canadian LNG Industry Can Put Itself At The Front Of The Queue To Meet It 3.30 Evaluating Models For Making LNG Pipeline And Terminal Projects Economically Attractive Enough To First Nations For Them To Provide Their Support • Projecting the current and anticipated levels of demand to see in order to facilitate the legal and social license for LNG export projects to go ahead • Weighing up potential revenue sharing options for making LNG projects economically attractive to First Nations • Analyzing a range of alternatives such equity participation and annual compensation of rent • Assessing strategies for ensuring First Nations benefit from the new job market created by the Canadian LNG export industry 8.40 Examining How Government Bodies, LNG Terminal Developers, Asian Buyers, First Nations & Pipeline Companies Can Collaborate To Expedite The Establishment Of A Canadian LNG Export Industry Whilst The Opportunity Is Still There • Determining how different LNG terminal developers can collaborate with each other and the rest of the industry to make sure exports come on stream as soon as possible • Evaluating options for key Asian buyers to collaborate on establishing LNG export infrastructure • Clarifying what First Nations need from industry and government stakeholders in order to get on board with LNG export projects • Examining what opportunities exist for companies and stakeholders throughout the Canadian oil & gas industry to participate and benefit from Canadian LNG export projects Krishnan Suthanthiran, President, Kitsault Energy Keo Lukefahr, General Manager for Natural Gas, PetroChina Karen Ogen, Chief, Wet’suwet’en First Nation 9.20 Question & Answer Session BUYER PERSPECTIVES: PRICING & ASIAN MARKETS FORECASTING THE PRICES & NETBACKS CANADIAN LNG EXPORTERS CAN EXPECT FOR THEIR PRODUCT & THE WILLINGNESS OF ASIAN BUYERS TO ENTER INTO LONG TERM CONTRACTS PRICING 9.30 Estimating The Key Factors That Will Affect The Pricing Of Canadian LNG Exports To Determine Whether Projects Will Be Economical • Evaluating what kind of netbacks Canadian LNG exporters can expect to receive • Understanding how the Canadian LNG industry can capitalize on established differentials between AECO and Henry Hub pricing in North America vs. current Asian prices • Forecasting how the rapid growth of LNG projects in Canada and globally will affect LNG prices • Determining how Canadian LNG exporters can remain price competitive in the context of current tax regimes Keo Lukefahr, General Manager for Natural Gas, PetroChina 10.00 Question & Answer Session 10.10 Morning Refreshments Served In Exhibition Showcase Area BUYERS PERSPECTIVE: LONG TERM CONTRACTS 10.40 Evaluating The Readiness Of Potential Buyers Of Canadian LNG To Enter Into Long Term Contracts To Mitigate Merchant Risk • Assessing the extent to which potential buyers are planning to enter into long term contracts rather than spot markets • Tracking the current trend for increased spot pricing of LNG in the global market to determine whether this will impact the viability of long term contracts for Canadian sellers • Providing case studies on the structures of recent LNG contracts to determine whether similar contracts would be economical for Canadian exporters • Analyzing whether there is enough commitment from buyers for long term contracts to justify the current rate of build out of LNG export terminals in Canada Venkateshwar Prasad Sinha, General Manager (LNG), Indian Oil Corporation 11.10 Question And Answer Session for LNG in Asia and the extent to which they are looking to diversify their supply sources • Understanding how this demand fits into the context of current global supply to determine the need for additional supply volumes from Canada • Delineating the key factors Asian buyers will be evaluating when choosing between Canadian LNG exports and other options such as the U.S.A., Australia and Qatar • Examining how Asian buyers currently view the competitivity of potential Canadian LNG exports in the global market S K Sur Chowdhury, Deputy General Manager (Gas), Indian Oil Corporation 11.50 Question & Answer Session 12.00 Networking Lunch Served In Exhibition Showcase Area ENGAGING WITH FIRST NATIONS PROVIDING VIEWS FROM BOTH FIRST NATIONS & INDUSTRY ON HOW THEY CAN COLLABORATE TO ESTABLISH AN LNG INDUSTRY THAT BENEFITS ALL PARTIES FIRST NATIONS: COMMUNICATION 1.00 Understanding How LNG Project Developers Can Engage First Nations On Ways They Can Benefit From Canadian LNG Exports • Brainstorming ideas on how industry can communicate with First Nations to ensure they understand the benefits of LNG projects for local communities • Providing case studies from on successful partnerships between First Nations and LNG project developers in Canada • Delivering a vision of what collaborative development of LNG export projects between First Nations and industry would look like • Delineating the responsibilities of the government vs. the responsibilities of the industry in communication with First Nations on LNG export projects PRESENTATION A: FIRST NATIONS PERSPECTIVE Archie Patrick, Chief, Stellet’en First Nations • Quantifying the specific benefits that First Nations need PRESENTATION A Robert Metcs, Chief Negotiator, First Nations PTP Group Limited Partnership PRESENTATION B Harold Calla, Executive Chair, First Nations Financial Management Board 4.20 Question & Answer Session 4.30 Ensuring Additional Infrastructure Such As Roads, Housing And Local Amenities Are In Place To Support Local LNG Shipping Ports • Identifying the impacts of rapid LNG growth upon communities in order to pinpoint and address the areas that need assistance • Evaluating strategies for helping northern communities deal with these impacts brought about by the development of the emerging Canadian LNG exports Industry to ensure they are well equipped to face the challenges to their everyday lives • Identifying the role that the Province and Municipality can play in supporting developments to ensure these stakeholders can directly influence the LNG projects that affect them • Assessing how municipalities and industry are working together to overcome barriers to encourage future collaboration and ultimately ensure that the LNG • Industry does not impact too negatively upon the local communities Ron Poole, Chief Administrative Officer, District of Kitimat PRESENTATION B: INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVE 5.00 Question & Answer Session Ron Brintnell, Vice President B.C. LNG Initiative, Enbridge 5.10 Chair’s Closing Remarks & End Of Day 2 1.50 Question & Answer Session 5.20 - 6.20 Networking Drinks Reception Served In Exhibition Showcase Areas FIRST NATIONS: OVERCOMING ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS 2.00 Specifying How The Concerns Of First Nations On The Environmental Impacts Of LNG Pipelines Can Be Allayed To Ensure Their Support For Planned Projects Extended Networking Opportunities • Detailing the key impacts LNG pipeline projects would have on First Nation communities to determine what the industry can do to mitigate them • Gaining insight into how developers of LNG pipelines in Canada can proactively help with restoration of First Nations land • Examining strategies for providing certainty that fish, forests and other natural habitats in First Nations land will not be affected by LNG pipeline projects • Analyzing how pipeline projects may affect the lifestyles of different First Nations and what can be done to minimize this impact Strategic Insights And Interactive Discussion PRESENTATION A: FIRST NATIONS PERSPECTIVE Stewart Philip, Grand Chief & President, Union of BC Indian Chiefs PRESENTATION B: GOVERNMENT PERSPECTIVE Laurel Nash, Chief Negotiator For LNG and Strategic Initiatives,Ministry of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation 2.50 Question & Answer Session 3.00 Afternoon Refreshments Served In Exhibition Showcase Area www.lng-exports-canada-2014.com (1) 800 721 3915 info@canadian-business-conferences.com
  • 4. Day 2 Wednesday June 19, 2014 8.30 Chair’s Opening Remarks LNG EXPORT TERMINAL DEVELOPMENTS Providing The Very Latest Updates On The Timings, Volumes And Global Competitivity Of Proposed Lng Export Terminals In Canada TIMESCALES FOR CANADIAN LNG EXPORT TERMINALS 8.40 Forecasting Projected Timescales For The Build Out Of Canadian LNG Export Terminals To Determine When The First Exports Will Be Shipped • Clarifying what stage of progression current LNG export terminal projects in Canada are at and when they are expected to come online • Determining by what date terminals need to come on stream to avoid falling too far behind projects in the U.S., Australia and Qatar • Identifying the key environmental, regulatory and economical hurdles that LNG terminal developers in Canada are facing and what other stakeholders can do help them overcome these hurdles • Gaining terminal developer perspectives on whether pipelines transporting natural gas to their facilities will be ready on time Krishnan Suthanthiran, President, Kitsault Energy 9.10 Question & Answer Session LOCATIONS AND VOLUMES OF CANADIAN LNG EXPORT TERMINALS SPEEDING UP THE BUILD OUT OF CANADIAN LNG INFRASTRUCTURE: Providing Updates On The Progress And Timings Of Proposed Canadian Lng Export Terminals And Pipelines And Examining Strategies For Overcoming Environmental, Regulatory & Labor Availability Bottlenecks LABOUR & SKILLS SHORTAGES Examining Industry & Government Strategies For Securing The Skilled Labour To Deliver Lng Terminal & Pipeline Projects On Time TACKLING THE LNG SKILLS SHORTAGE: INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES 11.20 Proposing Ideas On How Canadian LNG Export Terminal And Pipeline Developers Can Secure The Skilled Labour Necessary For The Build Out Of LNG Export Infrastructure • Evaluating strategies for sourcing foreign labour for LNG export terminal and pipeline projects • Accurately projecting the volumes of skilled labour required for specific LNG projects to allow adequate time to source and implement workers • Collaborating and cooperating with competing energy projects in Canada to ensure long term efficiency of labour and avoid any wasteful surpluses • Offering competitive packages for LNG workers to ensure they readily take up the jobs and are inclined to relocate • Identifying training facilities and programs that will provide consistency throughout a diverse pool of labour and will be ready to accommodate significant increases in volumes Carla Campbell-Ott, Executive Director, Petroleum Human Resources Council 11.50 Question & Answer Session GOVERNMENT STRATEGIES FOR FILLING THE LNG SKILLS GAP 12.00 Explaining The Government´s Vision For Supporting The Industry In Resolving The Shortage Of Skilled Labour For LNG Export Projects 9.20 Analyzing What Factors Will Determine Which LNG Export Terminal Projects Are Successful ... How Many Are Likely To Get Built And Where Will They Be? • Identifying plans to incentivize local and domestic • Providing views on how many LNG export terminals are • Outlining standards of training that employers must actually likely to be successful • Identifying the locations that have the highest likelihood of success based on proximity to potential pipelines and other geographical factors • Estimating the likely volumes of LNG that will ultimately be exported from Canada. Evaluating solutions for overcoming the non-technical aspects of bringing Canadian LNG export terminals online Canadian workforce towards LNG export projects • Establishing a clear immigration framework for temporary foreign workers to enter Canada and join projects adhere to for the purpose of ensuring consistent quality and safety on projects • Providing clarity on the code for the treatment of workers and support for employers so that neither side is treated unfairly and LNG projects are free from interruptions • Ensuring additional infrastructure such as roads, housing and local amenities are in place to support workers in local LNG projects Senior Representative, T.B.A, Ministry of Jobs, Skills & Training Susannah Pierce, General Manager, Shell 12.30 Question & Answer Session 9.50 Question & Answer Session 12.40 Networking Lunch Served In Exhibition Showcase Area 10.00 Morning Refreshments Served In Exhibition Showcase Area COMPETITIVITY OF CANADIAN LNG EXPORT TERMINALS 10.30 Evaluating How Economically Competitive Canadian LNG Terminals Will Be Against U.S., Australian & Other Global LNG Export Projects • Comparing the progress of the Canadian LNG export industry against that in the U.S., Australia, Russia and East Africa to forecast who will win the race to meet Asian demand • Deciphering the extent to which B.C.´s fiscal regime will impact the competitively of Canadian LNG exports in the global market • Examining the proximity of Canada’s LNG export facilities to crucial Asian markets when compared with competitors such as the USA & Australia to show the competitive advantage of Canadian LNG terminals • Taking into account Canada’s cool climate that facilitates the liquefying of natural gas and so decreases cost in order to show its competitive edge • Evaluating the advantage of Brownfields in the USA against Greenfields primarily in Canada to show where Canadian LNG terminals need to find a competitive edge elsewhere 11.10 Question & Answer Session LNG PIPELINE INFRASTRUCTURE Gaining Insight Into The Progress Being Made In Establishing Pipelines To Feed Lng Export Terminals LNG PIPELINE PROJECT UPDATES 1.40 Providing An Update On The Progress Being Made On Building The Requisite Pipelines To Transport Canadian Natural Gas To LNG Terminals • Examining the progress of pipeline projects associated with various LNG export terminals to understand which ones will be completed first • Exploring the options of either relying on a pipeline with only one source or choosing one that is connected to a hub and reliant on several sources to demonstrate the option for lower costs • Providing views on whether enough pipeline infrastructure will be in place in time to meet demand from currently planned export terminals • Analyzing the pipeline companies’ plans for further pipeline development to identify additional LNG projects 2.10 Question & Answer Session MITIGATING PIPELINE EFFECTS ON ENVIRONMENT & LOCAL COMMUNITIES • Understanding what is being done to maximize the safety of pipelines feeding LNG projects • Analyzing how pipelines for LNG projects can minimize impact on local communities in Canada • Weighing up how pipeline developers and terminal developers can collaborate to engage First Nations on their efforts to minimize environmental impacts Krishnan Suthanthiran, President, Kitsault Energy 2.50 Question & Answer Session TRANSFERABLE LESSONS FROM THE OIL SANDS 3.00 Explaining How Lessons Learnt From Overcoming The Challenges Of Developing The Northern Gateway Pipeline Can Be Applied To Canadian LNG Pipeline Projects • Explaining how LNG pipeline projects can replicate the success of the Northern Gateway Pipeline in gaining regulatory approval • Identifying which strategies for engaging with multiple First Nations on a major pipeline project can be best applied to similar projects in the LNG industry • Detailing how labour and skills shortages were met and if the same strategies can succeed in the LNG industry • Providing insight into how to manage the costs of a large scale pipeline project covering multiple provinces Michele Perret, Director Public and Aboriginal Engagement, Northern Gateway Pipelines, Enbridge 3.30 Question & Answer Session 3.40 Afternoon Refreshments Served In Exhibition Showcase Area SHIPPING & PORT AVAILABILITY Examining Solutions For Securing The Ships And Ports To Take Canadian LNG To Market SHIPPING AVAILAVILITY 4.10 Examining The Availability Of Ships & Ports For Transporting Canadian LNG Exports To Market To Determine Whether There Will Be Enough To Meet Demand • Determining how many ships will need to be built to meet demand from the Canadian LNG export industry and the readiness of the shipbuilding industry to meet this demand • Assessing the readiness of the key ports to service the emerging Canadian LNG export industry and which ones are best located to meet Asian demand • Providing insight into whether port depths and narrow channels will pose obstacles to shipping Canadian LNG • Evaluating the extent to which Canadian LNG has a competitive advantage due to shorter shipping distances to Asia compared with the U.S. Gulf Coast Tim Meisner, Director General Marine Policy,Transport Canada 4.40 Question & Answer Session SHIPPING SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 4.50 Providing Strategies For Ensuring The Safety Of Canadian Ships Carrying LNG And Mitigating Environmental Impacts • Analyzing how to ensure LNG shipping does not affect coastal settlements belonging to First Nations • Weighing up how current shipping rules and regulations may impact the shipping of Canadian LNG exports • Pinpointing strategies for ensuring the safe passage from harbors to open waters of ships carrying Canadian LNG • Looking at ways to preempt public concern and misinformation around the environmental impact of LNG shipping in Canada through clear communication by the industry 2.20 Examining Multi-Stakeholder Solutions For Overcoming The Environmental And Regulatory Challenges Of Building Pipelines For LNG Projects To Ensure They Are Completed In Time To Meet Terminal Demands Laureen Kinney, Associate ADM safety & Security, Transport Canada • Determining how to deal with complex environmental and 5.20 Question & Answer Session regulatory issues when dealing with pipelines that cross more than one province 5.30 Chair’s Closing Remarks & End Of Conference www.lng-exports-canada-2014.com (1) 800 721 3915 info@canadian-business-conferences.com
  • 5. Yes P I would like to register the delegate(s) below for the 2 day conference Canadian LNG Exports: Buyers, Sellers & Stakeholders Collaboration Initiative 2014 Details PLEASE USE CAPITALS - PHOTOCOPY FOR MULTIPLE DELEGATES Delegate 1 Delegate 2 * Mr * Mr * Dr * Miss * Ms * Mrs * Other: * Dr * Miss * Ms * Mrs * Other: Name Name Position Position Organization Organization Email Email Telephone Telephone Address For Invoice Purposes WE HAVE GROUP DISCOUNTS So you can involve your whole team Call for rates: (1) 800 721 3915 Zip/Postal Code Country Delegate Rates GUESTS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THEIR OWN TRAVEL AND ACCOMMODATION ARRANGEMENTS Super Early Booking Discount Early Booking Discount Standard Rate Book And Pay By Friday March 28, 2014 Book And Pay By Friday April 25, 2014 From April 26, 2014 * $1399 USD SAVE $400 * $1599 USD SAVE $200 2 Day Conference Pass Add Video & Audio Recordings Of The Event * $1799 USD * $399 USD All prices quoted above are inclusive of GST Payment PLEASE TICK APPROPRIATE BOXES AND COMPLETE DETAILS Payment must be received in full prior to the event. * 1. CREDIT CARD Option Please charge my * VISA * AMERICAN EXPRESS Amount $ USD Expiry date Card number Security Code / CVV (required) Name on card * MASTERCARD Signature of card holder * 2. INVOICE Option An invoice containing payment instructions will be sent electronically upon receipt of the completed registration form. How To Finalize Your Registration Terms & Conditions The conference is being organized by American Business Conferences, a division of London Business Conferences Ltd, a limited liability company formed under English company law and registered in the UK no. 5090859. Cancellations received 30 days prior to the start of the event will be eligible for a refund less $150 administration fee, after this point no refund will be given. Cancellations must be made in writing, if you are unable to attend you may nominate a colleague to attend in your place at no additional cost. Receipt of this registration form, inclusive or exclusive of payment constitutes formal agreement to attend and acceptance of the terms and conditions stated. All outstanding fees must be paid within our standard payment period of 7 days. Any outstanding invoices will remain valid should cancellation of attendance be received outside of the aforementioned cancellation period. *If you are claiming the early booking discount this may not be used in conjunction with other discounts advertised elsewhere. All discount codes and offers must be claimed at the time of registration. American Business Conferences reserves the right to alter or cancel the speakers or program. American Business Conferences reserve the right to refuse admission. We would like to keep you informed of other American Business Conferences products and services. This will be carried out in accordance with the Data Protection Act. Please write to the Head of Marketing, American Business Conferences at the address below if you specifically do not want to receive this information. American Business Conferences. City Center One. 800 Town & Country Blvd. Suite 300. Houston. Texas. 77024 American Business Conferences will not accept liability for any individual transport delays and in such circumstances the normal cancellation restrictions apply. American Business Conferences is a Division of London Business Conferences Limited, Registered in England No. 5090859 EIN. no: 98-0514924 Now that your details are completed please send your registration form to our Customer Service Team using one of the following options: Option 1. Email: info@canadian-business-conferences.com Option 2. Fax: (1) 800 714 1359 Enquiries And More Information Should you have any enquiries or if you would like to request more information please contact our friendly Customer Service Team on (1) 800 721 3915 or visit the conference website at www.lng-exports-canada-2014.com www.lng-exports-canada-2014.com (1) 800 721 3915 info@canadian-business-conferences.com

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