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Finland country presentation for LANGLETE in ESTFIT project.

Finland country presentation for LANGLETE in ESTFIT project.

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  • Finland is a country of over 5 million inhabitants located in northern Europe. A century ago Finland was still an impoverished country by European standards, dependent on subsistence farming. Finland’s progressive transformation into a well-functioning welfare society has been based on the belief that all citizens should have opportunities to develop themselves and society as a whole. In other words, everyone must have an opportunity to educate themselves.
  • Finland’s schoolchildren are ranked among the best in the world year after year in the PISA studies of the educational attainment levels of 15-year-olds in literacy, mathematics and science. This persistent success has attracted a lot of attention around the world – and many countries have tried to find out how they could change their own education systems by learning from the Finnish model. It can be reasonably argued that Finland provides the best basic education in the world. There are many reasons for the success of Finland’s education system. One of the most important factors is that Finnish teachers are the most highly trained anywhere in the world. Even primary school teachers need to have master’s degrees.  More importantly still, teaching as a profession is greatly valued in Finland. In a survey conducted in 2011 as many as 98% of parents said they appreciated the work of their children’s teachers. Teacher training courses consistently attract many more applicants than there are places available.  Finland’s former president MarttiAhtisaari, who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2008, started his career as a qualified primary school teacher.(Kuvaoikeudetostamatta, Gorilla: f9508421)
  • The success of Finland’s education system has nothing to do with individual world-beating elite schools. The system has instead been designed to provide equality of opportunity, by ensuring that all pupils – regardless of their gender, social class or geographical location – can benefit from excellent teaching. An emphasis on the teaching of girls is reflected in the fact that young Finnish women (aged 25–34) have been rated as having the fourth highest educational attainment levels worldwide. Teaching methods in Finland are far from authoritarian. Learning is based on discussion, working together, and pupils finding information for themselves. This striving for equality also involves taking special care of pupils with learning difficulties. For this reason Finland particularly emphasises the role of remedial teaching and opportunities for pupils from linguistic minorities.Education is provided free-of-charge in Finland all the way from pre-school level to university level. Schoolchildren additionally get a free school meal every day.  This gives everyone the chance to reach an educational level that suits their abilities and desires. Another indication of the success of the system is that variations in average educational attainment levels between different localities or city districts are only very small.  Schoolchildren’s educational achievement standards in Finland also show very little relation to their parents’ social class in comparison with other countries. This is undoubtedly part of the reason why Finland has the world’s third highest level of social mobility.
  • In addition to free schools and universities, Finland also has an extensive network of “citizens’ institutes” providing free tuition for all adults in a wide range of subjects. Studying is consequently a popular leisure-time activity among all age-groups. As many as 500,000 people join such courses every year – almost a tenth of the whole population. Learning is also very much part of working life in Finland. Each year more than 40% of the national workforce participate in some form of work-related training.
  • Finnish art and culture has not produced global stars who are instantly known to all nations. However, the Finnish cultural community has been filled with highly personal and respected figures in their own genre.For example, the cream of the list of the world’s leading conductors certainly includes Esa-PekkaSalonen, SakariOramo, Jukka-PekkaSaraste and others. Salonen conducted both the London and Los Angeles philharmonic orchestras during his career.A rising star in world-class conducting is another Finn, Susanna Mälkki, whohas made impressive debuts at the St. Louis and Boston Symphonic Orchestras. These conductors are all the students of one of the world’s most accomplished teachers of orchestral conducting at Sibelius-Academy: JormaPanula.In operatic singing, two other Finnish names are among the most respected globally: KaritaMattila, the colorfulsoprano, and Matti Salminen, the charismatic and powerful bass singer. Following in the line of the great composer Jean Sibelius are several new stars like KaijaSaariaho, Magnus Lindberg, KaleviAho and others.
  • Finland has achieved its good position by effectively solving its basic security, political and social stability related problems.1. A social ”rags-to-riches” storyOver the past 150 years Finland has survived famine, civil war and military confrontations with two global superpowers: the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany. In 1868 Finland lost one sixth of its population in one of Europe’s most devastating famines. In 1918, Finland suffered a short yet bloody civil war. Between 1939 and 1944, Finland had to defend its independence against the world’s two largest superpowers. These great collective trials and Finland’s ranking among the most successful nations have all contributed in making Finland a credible world leader in finding solutions for social affluence and stability.2. The development of awide policy of social and economic equality. Finland is a world pioneer of gender equity. The first women to receive full voting powers in the world i.e. to elect and be elected, were Finnish. As early as 1906, Finnish women occupied seats in the national parliament. In recent years, women have held, on two occasions, the positions of President and Prime Minister at the same time. Part of the thinking at the origin of this level of equality was that a small country could not afford not to use a half of its human capital if it wished to achieve greater level of prosperity.Finland’s non-hierarchical social heritage and its pragmatic approach to building political consensus has made Finland one of the world’s most stable nations. Most of the governmental coalitions of the past century have been made up of a diverse base of political groups. Finland also has a long tradition in the way state officials negotiate with the different parties of the labour market in solving disputes.
  • Finnish innovations are often designed to solve problems in a pragmatic and surprising way. At the heart of Finnish ingenuity is that things should work. Form and function must find each other in a seamless process towards a novel yet simple display of inventive genius. The Paimio chair created in 1932 by the great Finnish designer and architect, Alvar Aalto, is not only a beautiful blend of elegance and simplicity. It is also very comfortable. The Block lamp by HarriKoskinen is a more recent example of low-key original Finnish design. It became an instant classic, and it is now part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. In the world of fashion and textile design the most famous Finnish brand is Marimekko, which has been conquering the world since the 1960s. Marimekko is best known for its vivid prints with strong inspiration from nature. The whole world knows the Nokia phones, but not everyone knows that Nokia is a Finnish company. It was founded in the later part of the 19th century as a paper mill, and became a diverse conglomerate producing even rubber boots, before evolving into the mobile communications giant we know today. In a new Finnish twist to mobility, the Angry Birds highly original game has taken over the world with its basically simple puzzle logic and mechanics that have easily become second nature for its tens of millions of regular players.  The most luxurious cruise ships in the world are also examples of Finnish ingenuity and know-how. The world’s largest cruise ship, M/S Oasis of the Seas, cruising in the Caribbean, was designed and built in Turku, Finland.
  • Helsinki was named the World Design Capital for the year 2012. This is of course a tribute for Finland’s great design tradition. A stunning feature of Finnish society is the ability of most people to recognize the work of well-known designers.This special year at the top of world design is not only to celebrate design excellence in the household items and architecture. The World Design Capital year in Helsinki has been dedicated to all forms of design that help people enhance their daily lives. This includes innovation in the design of social services like traffic and security management. Finns have turned this special year of design into a full blown live laboratory for improving society at large.
  • It is hard to propose a single definition or translation of this term since it has, even for Finns, a wide range of meanings dependingon the context and the person. Sisucan best be described as a strong blend of courage and persistence; a sense of determinationthat is indifferent to the costs or consequences; a source of mental and spiritual strength that sometimes fallson the side of obstinacy; it is perseverance in action and a stoic and cool display of raw willpower.Jean Sibelius, the famous Finnish composer, defined sisuas a meta-physical shot in the arm which makes a man do theimpossible. Long-distancerunner Paavo Nurmi definedsisu as the dispassionatepatience and strong will that comes to people miraculouslyin times of stress.In sum, with sisu, most Finns have inherited a special mixture of guts and resilience, which surfacesespecially when the going gets tough.Much of the social and economic achievements of the past hundred years in Finland can be partly explained by the recurrence of sisu.
  • The development of a national policy and culture of social and economic equality. Finland is a world pioneer of gender equity. The first women to receive full voting powers in the world, i.e. to elect and be elected, were Finnish. As early as 1906, Finnish women occupied seats in the national parliament. In recent years, women have held, on two occasions, the positions of President and Prime Minister at the same time. Part of the thinking at the origin of this level of equality was that a small country could not afford not to use a half of its human capital if it wished to achieve greater level of prosperity.The political and economic evolution of Finland explains its exceptionally egalitarian way of operating. Finland’s non-hierarchical social heritage and its pragmatic approach to building political consensus has made Finland one of the world’s most stable nations. Most of the governmental coalitions of the past century have been made up of a diverse base of political groups. Finland also has a long tradition in the way state officials negotiate with the different parties of the labour market in solving disputes.  Most Finns strongly feel that they are socially equal to each other. In Finland, it is not unusual for subordinates to openly criticize the views and actions of management. Heads of major corporations, government ministers and other high-profile individuals are surprisingly accessible to the public.The Finnish wage and tax structures are based upon highly egalitarian precepts. The result is that a very large part of the population makes roughly the same income. By the same token, all of the impressive social services and support systems are indiscriminately available to all.  
  • The Finnish society is based on trust.One element that has allowed Finns to act courageously and with relative confidence is the firm trust that they place into other members of their community. Finland is at the top of the world’s trust indexes. This has been an important catalyst for the willingness and ability to attempt a variety of different solutions to our own problems.
  • It is not an exaggeration to say that Finland is the most functional country in the world. Airplanes and trains run on time, restaurant bills have no hidden charges and all streets and even airport runways are kept clean even if there has a severe winter storm on the previous night. One driving force behind this world-class functionality is the country’s level of social trust. In fact, Finland is a leader in many international trust related research and indexes. In one Gallup Poll (2008) Finns ranked number one in the world in those who believe that their wallets would be returned to them if it were lost.
  • Finns are often believed to be relatively silent. Actually, this means that they are good listeners. This can provide opportunities for establishing trustand creating social and economic success. Silence creates the social space for the all-important art of listening. Many Asian cultures pointout that humans have two ears and only one mouth for a reason. Finns have strongly internalized this belief. They are generally masters of the art of listening before speaking. They often take their time to understand and diagnose what a person has to say before adding their own voice and creating a dialogue. If you add in the high-level education and the Finnish egalitarian ethic, you obtain a recipe for an extremely economical and well-balanced communication culture.When everyone gets a chance to be heard, it ensures that a wider base of information is available, which in turn generates more enlightened decisions. This disposition for listening is interestingly embedded in the Finnish language. The word for a speech or verbal address is “puheenvuoro” which literally means “speech turn.” The notion that communication in Finland should be taken in turns is a reinforcement of the idea that you should respect a person’s moment of speech. In Finland, it is extremely rude to interrupt when someone else is speaking. Finns also frown upon those who take “too many turns” at speaking. This is deemedrude and inefficient.
  • Combination of traditional cuisine and continental style cooking Fish and poultry Whole meal products, berries Milk
  • From a European perspective, Finland is a fairly large country with a good level of geographic and demographic diversity. Helsinki and other large Finnish cities are modern and international. By contrast, the rest of the country is sparsely populated.
  • In Finland, the four seasons are distinctive and have their own color and temperature. Finland in the Winter and Summer feels like two completely different countries.
  • Sauna an important part of Finnish culture In Finland there are about two millions of saunas (on average one per household)
  • In Finland, the four seasons are distinctive and have their own color and temperature. Finland in the Winter and Summer feels like two completely different countries.
  • Finnish belongs to he Finnic group of the Finno-Ugric family of languages There are two main varieties of Finnish: standard language (yleiskieli) spoken language (puhekieli)Finnish is a synthetic and an agglutinative language.
  • Finnish belongs to he Finnic group of the Finno-Ugric family of languages There are two main varieties of Finnish: standard language (yleiskieli) spoken language (puhekieli)Finnish is a synthetic and an agglutinative language.
  • Finnish belongs to he Finnic group of the Finno-Ugric family of languages There are two main varieties of Finnish: standard language (yleiskieli) spoken language (puhekieli)Finnish is a synthetic and an agglutinative language.

Finland country presentation Finland country presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Finland9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 1
  • WELCOME TO FINLAND!9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 2
  • POPULATION: 5.4 million LOCATION: Northern Europe; shares borders with CURRENCY: Euro Sweden, Norway and Russia INTERNATIONAL STATUS: Achieved CAPITAL: Helsinki (population 596,000) independence in 1917; member of the European OFFICIAL LANGUAGES: Finnish 90.4 %, Swedish Union since 1995; militarily non-aligned 5.4 % ECONOMIC STRUCTURE: Services 67 % of RELIGIONS: Evangelical Lutheran Church 78 %; GDP, industry 30 %, agriculture 3 %; exports Orthodox Church 1 %; no religious affiliation 19 %; account for 39 % of GDP other religious communities 2 % AREA: 338,000 km² (130,500 square miles) SYSTEM OF GOVERNMENT: Parliamentary democracy; presidential elections every six years; Parliament (200 members) elected every four years GDP PER CAPITA Education level 33% Basic Level € 33,600 39% Upper Secondary Level 28% Tertiary (University) Level GERMANY FINLAND USA EU9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 3
  • EDUCATION AND CULTURE9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 4
  • Finland’s history is a history of progress on education.9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 5
  • Finland’s schoolchildren are ranked among the best in the world year after year in the PISA studies. Teachers are highly appreciated in Finland.9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 6
  • Top scores are achieved where everyone has equal opportunities. Free education for all.9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 7
  • Life-long learning. Learning is for all ages. It is also for free.9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 8
  • Finnish culture is rich with unique and personal figures.9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 9
  • Finland’s history is filled with solutions to difficult problems.9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 10
  • Finland is creative. Our best solutions are the most uncommon.9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 11
  • Thinking in terms of design produces unique solutions.9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION KUVA: MAARIT MUSTONEN 12
  • FINNISH CHARACTER9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 13
  • Finnish character Sisu Courage Perseverance9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 14
  • Finnish people have been pioneers in promoting social equality.9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 15
  • The Finnish society is based on trust.9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 16
  • Finns are punctual.9/27/2012 FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 17
  • Finns are good listeners.9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 18
  • CUISINE AND TRAVEL9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 19
  • Combination of traditional cuisine and continental style cooking9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION KUVA: MAARIT MUSTONEN 20
  • Finland is both about the city and the countryside.9/27/2012 FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 21
  • Summer and winter are as different as night and day.9/27/2012 FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 22
  • The Funny side of Finland… Air Guitar and Finnish Sauna World Championships.9/27/2012 FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 23
  • The Funny side of Finland… Wife Carrying and World Cell Phone Throwing Championships9/27/2012 FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 24
  • SOME USEFUL TIPS  Don’t try to greet a Finn with kisses! Finns shake hands and make eye contact. Handshakes are brief and firm, and involve no supporting gestures.  The Finns are polite and respectful. They wait and stay at line with patience everywhere and in every situation, and wait for green at the light for cross over.  Don t talk too much or express feelings in public. Finns place great value on words, which is reflected in the tendency to say little and avoid unnecessary small talk. They are better at listening than at talking.9/27/2012 FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 25
  • SOME USEFUL TIPS  Finns drink coffee anywhere and anytime. More coffee per person is drunk in Finland than anywhere else in the world.  If you go to someone s home, a plant or flowers for the hostess or host is the norm. When entering someone’s home, you have to take your shoes off.  Do accept an invitation to a sauna. Having a sauna is something completely natural to Finns. There are 1.5 million saunas in Finland.  Finns love Karaoke!9/27/2012 FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 26
  • lentokonesuihkuturbiinimoottoriapumekaanikkoaliupseerioppilas9/27/2012 FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 27
  • THANK YOU (KIITOS) AND WELCOME TO FINLAND!9/27/2012 LEARNWELL OY FINLAND COUNTRY PRESENTATION 28