ReadingResponseProject<br />Krysti Cotton<br />LAE 3414<br /> Summer B<br />4 August 2009<br />
Graphic Novel<br />
The Adventures of Super Diaper BabyGraphic Novel<br />In the Classroom<br />I would use this book to introduce<br />the ge...
Nonfiction<br />
Meet President BarackObamaBiography<br />Written by Laine Falk<br />Photographs<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />As a young ...
I am Rose ParksAutobiography<br />Written by Rosa Parks<br />Illustrated by Wil Clay<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />Rosa P...
FloridaInformational<br />Written by Carmen Bredeson<br />Photo researcher Coraline Anderson<br />Primary<br />Florida is ...
Great Snakes!Informational<br />In the Classroom<br />This is a good book to offer boys<br />who are showing little intere...
Culturally Diverse<br />
The Devil’s ArithmeticCulturally Diverse<br />Written by Jane Yolen<br />Intermediate<br />Cadelcott Medal (1968, 1988)<br...
In My Family-En Mi FamiliaCulturally Diverse<br />Written and Painted by Carmen Lomas Garza<br />Intermediate<br />Pura Be...
Fantasy<br />
Johnny AppleseedTraditional Fantasy<br />Retold by Steven Kellogg<br />Illustrated by Steven Kellogg<br />Primary/Intermed...
Hansel and GretelTraditional Fantasy<br />Written and Illustrated by James Marshall<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />Hansel ...
Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s EarsTraditional Fantasy<br />Retold by Verna Aardema<br />Illustrated by Leo and Diane Dil...
Imogene’s AntlersModern Fantasy<br />Written by David Small<br />Illustrated by<br />Primary<br />Imogene wakes one mornin...
Fiction<br />
ABC an Amazing Alphabet BookABC<br />Written and Illustrated by Dr. Seuss<br />Primary<br />This book goes through the<br ...
ChickaChicka Boom BoomABC<br />ESOL<br />The alphabet letters are in BOLD<br />throughout the story.<br />Colorful picture...
Baby Bear, Baby Bear, What Do You See? Predictable<br />Students can make their own<br />books choosing the new animals<br...
ChickaChicka Boom BoomPredictable<br />Written by Bill Martin, Jr. and John Archambault<br />Illustrated by Lois Ehlert<br...
Tonight on the TitanicHistorical Fiction<br />Written by Mary Pope Osbourne<br />Illustrated by Salvatore Murdocca<br />Pr...
Hour of the OlympicsHistorical Fiction<br />Written by Mary Pope Osbourne<br />Illustrated by Salvatore Murdocca<br />Prim...
Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?Rhythm, Rhyme and Repetition<br />Written by Bill Martin Jr.<br />Illustrated by E...
Baby Bear, Baby Bear, What Do You See? Rhythm, Rhyme and Repetition<br />Written by Bill Martin, Jr.<br />Illustrated by E...
TuesdayWordless<br />Illustrated by David Wiesner<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />Caldecott Medal (1992)<br />Frogs start i...
Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly BusBeginning Chapter Series<br />Written by Barbara Park<br />Illustrated by Denise B...
Junie B. Jones Loves Handsome WarrenBeginning Chapter Series<br />In the Classroom<br />Can use this book as in<br />intro...
FlippedContemporary Realistic Fiction<br />In the Classroom<br />Students will be able to relate to<br />the language and ...
Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly BusContemporary Realistic Fiction<br />Written by Barbara Park<br />Illustrated by De...
Award Winners<br />
SwimmyCaldecott Award<br />Written and Illustrated by Leo Lionni<br />Primary<br />Swimmy is the only black fish in his<br...
FredrickCaldecott Award<br />Written and Illustrated by Leo Lionni<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />Caldecott Award<br />As ...
Dear Mr. HenshawNewbery Award<br />In the Classroom<br />After reading this book, students<br />can correspond with pen pa...
The Tale of DespereauxNewbery Award<br />In the Classroom<br />Can be used to compare<br />and contrast with the movie<br ...
A Wreath for Emmett TillCoretta Scott King Award<br />In the Classroom<br />Can be used to show various<br />types and sty...
Mister SeahorseLaura Ingalls Wilder Award<br />Written by Eric Carle<br />Illustrated by Eric Carle<br />Primary<br />Laur...
Poetry<br />
Alphabet Break<br />I&apos;m learning all my ABC&apos;s,<br />I&apos;m good at D, E, F and G&apos;s.<br /> I&apos;ve maste...
Noise Day<br />Let’s have one day for girls and boysesWhen you can make the grandest noises.Screech, scream, clang a bell,...
 The Homework Machine<br />The Homework Machine, oh the Homework Machine, Most perfect contraption that&apos;s ever been s...
Purple Orangutans<br />Element: rhyme, alliteration, image, personification<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />Purple oranguta...
Today is not a good day<br />Today is not a good day. <br />I woke up sick in bed.<br />My stomach has a stabbing pain<br ...
I Dreamed I was Riding a Zebra<br />I dreamed I was riding a zebra<br />with curly pink hair on his head <br />and when I ...
Keep a Poem in Your Pocket<br />Keep a poem in your pocket  <br />and a picture in your head  <br />and you&apos;ll never ...
What I’ve Learned at School<br />At school I’ve learned a lot of things<br />I really like to do,<br />like running in the...
Isaac Newton<br />Sir Isaac Newton sure was<br />smart,<br />beneath the apple tree.<br />When one fell off and hit his<br...
Under the Bed<br />Element: rhyme, image<br />Primary<br />There’s a terrible green<br />Monster who lives beneath my<br /...
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Reading Response

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Reading Response

  1. 1. ReadingResponseProject<br />Krysti Cotton<br />LAE 3414<br /> Summer B<br />4 August 2009<br />
  2. 2. Graphic Novel<br />
  3. 3. The Adventures of Super Diaper BabyGraphic Novel<br />In the Classroom<br />I would use this book to introduce<br />the genre of graphic novels<br />because most students would<br />be unfamiliar with it. <br />I would also use this book to grab<br />the attention of students,<br />mostly boys, who dislike<br />reading or cannot find a genre<br />they enjoy. <br />ESOL<br />Easy to follow illustrations.<br />Interactive steps for students to<br />follow and get more involved in<br />the story.<br />Written and Illustrated by DavPilkey<br />Intermediate<br />As an evil villain is trying to escape<br />with Captain Underpants’<br />superhero formula, a baby is born.<br />The baby ends up drinking the<br />formula and Super Diaper Baby is<br />born. The villain tries one failed<br />attempt after the other to reclaim<br />the formula. In the end, Super<br />Diaper Baby is triumphant. <br />
  4. 4. Nonfiction<br />
  5. 5. Meet President BarackObamaBiography<br />Written by Laine Falk<br />Photographs<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />As a young boy, BarackObama<br />lived with his mother and<br />grandparents in Hawaii, where<br />he was born. As a child he<br />traveled and lived in many<br />places but ended back in<br />Hawaii during high school,<br />where he enjoyed playing<br />basketball. After college he<br />worked as a teacher and<br />lawyer. Now he lives in the<br />White House with his wife and<br />two daughters.<br />In the Classroom<br />This can be used to introduce the<br />President of the United States<br />to those students who are<br />unfamiliar with his background.<br />Students can learn the difference<br />between biographies and<br />autobiographies based on point<br />Of view.<br />ESOL<br />If students are new to the US, they<br />will gain knowledge and are<br />assisted with the photographs.<br />Can also be used to introduce<br />vocabulary related to politics,<br />government and the election<br />process. <br />
  6. 6. I am Rose ParksAutobiography<br />Written by Rosa Parks<br />Illustrated by Wil Clay<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />Rosa Parks begins by explaining<br />segregation and why she was<br />arrested. She then gets into her<br />childhood. She grew up in<br />Alabama with her family and often<br />was teased for the color of her<br />skin. She explains there was a huge<br />bus boycott, which she<br />participated in. This is when the<br />Supreme Court stepped in and<br />said segregation is wrong! She<br />ends her story by stating<br />“I hope children today will grow up<br />without hate.”<br />In the Classroom<br />This book can be used to introduce<br />an extremely significant historical<br />figure.<br />Vocabulary in this book, such as<br />boycott and segregation, can be<br />introduced and discussed.<br />ESOL<br />Illustrations accompany most of the<br />text can assist in comprehension<br />and translation.<br />Students can read it after a social<br />studies lesson, therefore applying<br />background knowledge.<br />
  7. 7. FloridaInformational<br />Written by Carmen Bredeson<br />Photo researcher Coraline Anderson<br />Primary<br />Florida is described as a very sunny<br />and tropical place. The book<br />begins by explaining the<br />various beaches and wildlife<br />that can be seen in Florida.<br />Next, various cities are<br />spotlighted like Orlando and<br />Miami. The book ends by<br />describing various occupations<br />people can work depending<br />on the region/city they live in. <br />In the Classroom<br />I would use this book to show<br />examples of various occupations<br />during an introductory<br />community economics lesson.<br />This can also be used to introduce<br />unfamiliar wildlife and cities to<br />the students.<br />ESOL<br />This book uses real photographs. This<br />helps the student make<br />connections with the text while<br />reading. <br />This book can also serve as an<br />introduction to the community<br />for a student who is from out of<br />the state or country.<br />
  8. 8. Great Snakes!Informational<br />In the Classroom<br />This is a good book to offer boys<br />who are showing little interest in<br />reading.<br />Incorporates rhyming, counting<br />and details to teach students<br />about various types of snakes.<br />ESOL<br />Students can use the image<br />glossary to find a specific type of<br />snake.<br />This book is full of detail-rich<br />illustrations.<br />Written by Fay Robinson<br />Illustrated by Jean Day Zallinger<br />Primary<br />The story begins by counting off<br />snakes by two’s. They describe<br />their various marks, where they<br />live, about their skin and even<br />how they are born. The story ends<br />with counting by two’s again. The<br />book includes a reference page. <br />
  9. 9. Culturally Diverse<br />
  10. 10. The Devil’s ArithmeticCulturally Diverse<br />Written by Jane Yolen<br />Intermediate<br />Cadelcott Medal (1968, 1988)<br /> National Jewish Book Award (1989)<br />Hannah is bored and annoyed<br />with her family gatherings.<br />Everyone pinches her cheeks and<br />only talks about the past.<br />Mysteriously Hanna is sent into the<br />past where she is known as<br />Chaya. Her new family and friends<br />are placed into a concentration<br />camp where Hannah gets a first<br />hand account of the devastation of<br />the Holocaust. Before it’s too late,<br />Hanna thankfully makes it home,<br />where she has a new appreciation<br />for her family’s past.<br />In the Classroom<br />Great as an extension to a<br />Holocaust lesson.<br />Can be compared and<br />contrasted to other texts, such as<br />The diary of Anne Frank.<br />ESOL<br />Can be used as a read aloud in<br />order to define some of the<br />vocabulary.<br />Can incorporate the use of<br />graphic organizers for compare<br />and contrast of similar texts.<br />
  11. 11. In My Family-En Mi FamiliaCulturally Diverse<br />Written and Painted by Carmen Lomas Garza<br />Intermediate<br />Pura Belpre Honor (1998)<br />In this story, the author introduces<br />her family and what traditional food<br />they like to eat. She then explains<br />various holiday traditions and also<br />the folktales her family has passed<br />down from generation to<br />generation. She ends by explaining<br />how important gatherings and<br />fiestas are. <br />In the Classroom<br />Can use this book to introduce<br />new words, such as fiesta.<br />Can use when learning about<br />various cultures and countries,<br />such as Mexico, especially if there<br />is a new Spanish-speaking student<br />in the classroom.<br />ESOL<br />Every page is translated in both<br />English and Spanish.<br />Can offer to a student to make<br />reading less stressful. If they are<br />not yet comfortable to read<br />entirely in English. <br />
  12. 12. Fantasy<br />
  13. 13. Johnny AppleseedTraditional Fantasy<br />Retold by Steven Kellogg<br />Illustrated by Steven Kellogg<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />Johnny grew up loving animals and<br />nature. As a young boy he<br />began planting apple seeds<br />wherever he traveled. These<br />seeds developed into trees and<br />soon orchards were spread<br />across all of Ohio. As a young<br />man he warned of the<br />war and troops who traveled<br />because he had made friends<br />with both the Native Americans<br />and the locals. He would share<br />wilderness stories and people<br />would pass them on to others.<br />His stories lived on even after<br />he passed away in 1845.<br />In the Classroom<br />Can be used as an introduction<br />To the War of 1812 and it’s<br />geography.<br /> Can be used to as<br />an example of traditional<br />fantasy tales that can be<br />linked to historical events and<br />individuals. <br />ESOL<br />Elaborate illustrations which can<br />Tell the story without the text.<br />Can be used alongside various<br />versions of leveled stories about<br />Johnny Appleseed, for<br />Independent reading.<br />
  14. 14. Hansel and GretelTraditional Fantasy<br />Written and Illustrated by James Marshall<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />Hansel and Gretel’s evil mother,<br />talk their loving father into leaving<br />them in the woods. Thankfully<br />Hansel leaves behind a trail of<br />stones. The next time it happens<br />he leaves a trail of bread, only the<br />birds end up eating the pieces.<br />After days of traveling in the<br />woods they come across a witch’s<br />house. She tries at have them for<br />dinner but they distract her, steal<br />her treasures and make an<br />escape.<br />In the Classroom<br />Can be used as a prediction tool, to<br />activate background knowledge for<br />those students who have heard this<br />story before. <br />Used as an introduction to<br />traditional fantasy genre.<br />ESOL<br />The illustrations can tell the story<br />without the texts.<br />Use this book and genre as a way<br />for students to tell tales from their<br />cultures, thus making personal<br />connections. <br />
  15. 15. Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s EarsTraditional Fantasy<br />Retold by Verna Aardema<br />Illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon<br />Intermediate<br />Caldecott (1976)<br />A mosquito annoys an iguana<br />who places sticks in his ears. This<br />cause quite a commotion which<br />unfortunately ends in an owlet<br />getting killed. His mother owl is so<br />upset she does not wake the sun<br />in the morning. The animals get to<br />the bottom of who is to blame, but<br />mosquito buzzes away before he<br />is caught. Now he goes from<br />person to person asking “ZEEE! Is<br />everyone still angry with me?”<br />In the Classroom<br />Can be used when discussing<br />various cultures and countries. <br />After reading students can create<br />their own “Why..” books, in which<br />they create an original tale.<br />ESOL<br />Vibrant colored images show assist<br />the text to tell the story. <br />Various types of text help to<br />differentiate which character is<br />speaking.<br />
  16. 16. Imogene’s AntlersModern Fantasy<br />Written by David Small<br />Illustrated by<br />Primary<br />Imogene wakes one morning to<br />find antlers on top of her head.<br />Her mother faints and a doctor is<br />called, but he cannot seem to<br />find a cure. Imogene and her<br />antlers help with the chores<br />including feeding the birds.<br />Imogene falls asleep and when<br />she wakes in the morning her<br />antlers are gone, however, she<br />has grown peacock feathers!<br />In the Classroom<br />After reading, students can write a<br />story following the storyline in this<br />book. <br />Can be used to compare and<br />contrast modern and traditional<br />fantasy. <br />ESOL<br />Detailed drawings depict the<br />story. <br />Can have students make up their<br />own stories to go along with the<br />pictures in the book.<br />
  17. 17. Fiction<br />
  18. 18. ABC an Amazing Alphabet BookABC<br />Written and Illustrated by Dr. Seuss<br />Primary<br />This book goes through the<br />alphabet and makes the<br />letter/sound connection through<br />the use of animals and alliteration.<br />In the classroom<br />This book is an obvious choice for<br />introduction to the alphabet. <br />It can also be used for<br />letter/sound recognition. <br />ESOL <br />This book can be used for students<br />learning the alphabet.<br />Can be a model for students to<br />create their own alphabet book,<br />which can be used when needed. <br />
  19. 19. ChickaChicka Boom BoomABC<br />ESOL<br />The alphabet letters are in BOLD<br />throughout the story.<br />Colorful pictures accompany<br />storyline.<br />Written by Bill Martin, Jr. and John Archambault<br />Illustrated by Lois Ehlert<br />Primary<br />Little ‘a’ goes up the tree and the<br />alphabet follows. All of a sudden<br />the tree starts to tip and everyone<br />falls down. Little by little they<br />unwind, turn right side up and<br />head back up the tree.<br />In the Classroom<br />Introduction to the alphabet.<br />Can be used when teaching<br />beginning letter sounds.<br />
  20. 20. Baby Bear, Baby Bear, What Do You See? Predictable<br />Students can make their own<br />books choosing the new animals<br />they have been introduced to. <br />ESOL<br />Students will quickly catch on to<br />the repetition of the story.<br />The animal images are<br />labeled. <br />Written by Bill Martin, Jr.<br />Illustrated by Eric Carle<br />Primary<br />Baby Bear begins by seeing a fox,<br />who sees a flying squirrel. The story<br />continues and the animals see a<br />striped skunk and a mule deer.<br />Finally, Mama Bear sees all of the<br />other animals plus her Baby Bear. <br />In the Classroom<br />This book introduces new<br />vocabulary and animals, such as<br />flying squirrel, prairie dog and<br />mule deer. <br />
  21. 21. ChickaChicka Boom BoomPredictable<br />Written by Bill Martin, Jr. and John Archambault<br />Illustrated by Lois Ehlert<br />Primary<br />Little ‘a’ goes up the tree and the<br />alphabet follows. All of a sudden<br />the tree starts to tip and everyone<br />falls down. Little by little they<br />unwind, turn right side up and<br />head back up the tree.<br />In the Classroom<br />Introduction to the alphabet.<br />Can be used when teaching<br />beginning letter sounds.<br />ESOL<br />The alphabet letters are in BOLD<br />throughout the story.<br />Colorful pictures accompany<br />storyline.<br />
  22. 22. Tonight on the TitanicHistorical Fiction<br />Written by Mary Pope Osbourne<br />Illustrated by Salvatore Murdocca<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />Jack and Annie are called to Magic Tree House. They find out they are going on an adventure on the Titanic. Jack and Annie have to race against time in order to save two children as the ship begins to sink. There are only a select number of life boats and luckily the children make it on safely. <br />In the Classroom<br />Great to have in the classroom to<br />introduce chapter series to<br />students.<br />Good to introduce a historical<br />event through relatable<br />characters.<br />ESOL<br />Includes illustrations throughout<br />the book to assist the story.<br />Can be a stepping stone from<br />storybooks to chapter books. <br />
  23. 23. Hour of the OlympicsHistorical Fiction<br />Written by Mary Pope Osbourne<br />Illustrated by Salvatore Murdocca<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />Jack and Annie receive a sign<br />and head for the Magic Tree<br />House. Soon they find out they are<br />going to Greece. They are racing<br />against time to witness a<br />collection of sports events. They<br />learn this event will be known as<br />the Olympics.<br />In the Classroom<br />Great to have in the classroom to<br />introduce chapter series to<br />students.<br />Good to introduce a historical<br />event through relatable<br />characters.<br />ESOL<br />Includes illustrations throughout<br />the book to assist the story.<br />Can be a stepping stone from<br />storybooks to chapter books. <br />
  24. 24. Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?Rhythm, Rhyme and Repetition<br />Written by Bill Martin Jr.<br />Illustrated by Eric Carle<br />Primary<br />Brown bird sees Red bird and the<br />story continues on. Purple cat sees<br />White dog and he sees a Teacher.<br />The teacher sees children in the<br />classroom.<br />In the Classroom<br />Teachers can use this book to<br />reestablish color names.<br />Students can make their own<br />books choosing the animals and<br />colors to include. <br />ESOL<br />Students will quickly catch on to<br />the repetition of the story.<br />The colors and animals are<br />labeled. <br />
  25. 25. Baby Bear, Baby Bear, What Do You See? Rhythm, Rhyme and Repetition<br />Written by Bill Martin, Jr.<br />Illustrated by Eric Carle<br />Primary<br />Baby Bear begins by seeing a fox,<br />who sees a flying squirrel. The story<br />continues and the animals see a<br />striped skunk and a mule deer.<br />Finally, Mama Bear sees all of the<br />other animals plus her Baby Bear. <br />In the Classroom<br />This book introduces new<br />vocabulary and animals, such as<br />flying squirrel, prairie dog and<br />mule deer. <br />Students can make their own<br />books choosing the new animals<br />they have been introduced to. <br />ESOL<br />Students will quickly catch on to<br />the repetition of the story.<br />The animal images are<br />labeled. <br />
  26. 26. TuesdayWordless<br />Illustrated by David Wiesner<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />Caldecott Medal (1992)<br />Frogs start in a pond and as night<br />approaches they go on an<br />adventure.<br />Using their lily pads, the frogs travel<br />through the streets, into the homes<br />of sleeping families and end back in<br />Their pond. <br />In the classroom<br />Introduce students to a new way of<br />telling a story. Through the use of<br />pictures alone, have the students tell<br />an interesting story they have made<br />up. <br />Have the students write their own<br />Words to the wordless book as a<br />language arts activity.<br />ESOL<br />This is helpful because the student<br />Has no words to read and they will<br />Not feel pressured or stressed with<br />the book.<br />Full of rich images that each student<br />can interpret individually.<br />
  27. 27. Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly BusBeginning Chapter Series<br />Written by Barbara Park<br />Illustrated by Denise Brunkus<br />Primary<br />Junie B. Jones is excited about<br />kindergarten but she is not excited<br />about riding the stupid smelly bus.<br />Meanies pour chocolate milk on<br />your head on the bus so after<br />school Junie B. hides. She hides in<br />the supply closet, in the library and<br />even in the nurse’s office. Finally<br />Junie is found by the school janitor<br />and she receives a stern talking to<br />from her mom, teacher and the<br />principal. <br />In the Classroom<br />This is a great book to read for<br />incoming kindergartners.<br />Can be used to introduce chapter<br />series to students. <br />ESOL<br />Good to use for an introduction to<br />chapter books. <br />Still incorporates illustrations<br />throughout the book to assist the<br />story.<br />
  28. 28. Junie B. Jones Loves Handsome WarrenBeginning Chapter Series<br />In the Classroom<br />Can use this book as in<br />introduction to chapter books.<br />Relatable story that students can<br />enjoy.<br />ESOL<br />Good to use for an introduction<br />to chapter books. Still<br />incorporates illustrations<br />throughout the book to assist the<br />story.<br />Written by Barbara Park<br />Illustrated by Denise Brunkus<br />Primary<br />Junie B. loves playing before<br />school with her best friends Lucille<br />and Grace. One morning she sees<br />Lucille talking to the most<br />handsome boy and decides he<br />will be her new boyfriend. After<br />arguments among the girls, she<br />finally meets Warren. He thinks<br />Junie B. is a nutball! She tries<br />everything to impress him, but<br />soon realizes all she needs to do is<br />be herself, and nobody else!<br />
  29. 29. FlippedContemporary Realistic Fiction<br />In the Classroom<br />Students will be able to relate to<br />the language and dialogue<br />used in the story.<br />Can incorporate a discussion and<br />an activity about point of view.<br />ESOL<br />Can partner read, one partner<br />takes Bryce’s part and one takes<br />Juliana’s part.<br />The class can create Venn<br />Diagram comparing events from<br />Bryce’s and Juliana’s perspective. <br />Written by Wendelin Van Draanen<br />Intermediate<br />Bryce and Juliana met when they<br />were in second grade. For her it<br />was love at first sight, for him it was<br />NOT! As they get older, Juli is a<br />know-it-all and Bryce is only<br />concerned with basketball and<br />hanging out with his best friend.<br />After various confrontations Bryce<br />ends up having a change of<br />heart.<br />
  30. 30. Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly BusContemporary Realistic Fiction<br />Written by Barbara Park<br />Illustrated by Denise Brunkus<br />Primary<br />Junie B. Jones is excited about<br />kindergarten but she is not excited<br />about riding the stupid smelly bus.<br />Meanies pour chocolate milk on<br />your head on the bus so after<br />school Junie B. hides. She hides in<br />the supply closet, in the library and<br />even in the nurse’s office. Finally<br />Junie is found by the school janitor<br />and she receives a stern talking to<br />from her mom, teacher and the<br />principal.<br />In the Classroom<br />This is a great book to read for<br />incoming kindergartners.<br />Can be used to introduce chapter<br />series to students. <br />ESOL<br />Good to use for an introduction to<br />chapter books. <br />Still incorporates illustrations<br />throughout the book to assist the<br />story.<br />
  31. 31. Award Winners<br />
  32. 32. SwimmyCaldecott Award<br />Written and Illustrated by Leo Lionni<br />Primary<br />Swimmy is the only black fish in his<br />red family. Sadly, his family is<br />eaten by a large fish. Swimmy<br />travels throughout the entire sea,<br />where he meets all types of fish.<br />He eventually meets a school of<br />fish who are red just like his family.<br />They are hiding because they are<br />afraid of the larger fish. Swimmy<br />devises a plan to swim together in<br />the shape of one large red fish,<br />where he is the eye. Together they<br />scare the large fish away!<br />In the Classroom<br />This book shows various sea<br />creatures, that students can learn<br />about.<br />As an extension, have students write<br />who else Swimmy might see as he<br />travels.<br />ESOL<br />Beautifully crafted images to assist<br />text. <br />Students may be able to relate to<br />the unique character who lives in<br />a new place with new people.<br />
  33. 33. FredrickCaldecott Award<br />Written and Illustrated by Leo Lionni<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />Caldecott Award<br />As the other mice are gathering<br />food in preparation for winter,<br />Fredrick is gathering colors, words<br />and sunshine. The others think he<br />just being lazy. In the middle of<br />winter the food runs low and the<br />cold sets in. Fredrick is there to<br />offer sunshine and colors and<br />even impressive words and<br />poems. The other mice realize that<br />is just what they need.<br />In the Classroom<br />This book introduces new,<br />advanced vocabulary.<br />Can be used as a follow up when<br />learning about animals and their<br />habitats. <br />ESOL<br />Detailed illustrations depict exactly<br />what the text reads. <br />Teachers can define some of the<br />tougher vocabulary before<br />reading the story. <br />
  34. 34. Dear Mr. HenshawNewbery Award<br />In the Classroom<br />After reading this book, students<br />can correspond with pen pals. <br />Students can discuss their favorite<br />author and books. <br />ESOL<br />Illustrations assist the text while<br />Reading.<br />After reading activities can<br />include writing prompts which will<br />increase fluency and speaking<br />abilities.<br />Written by Beverly Cleary<br />Illustrated by Paul O. Zelinsky<br />Newbery Award Winner (1984)<br />All Leigh has ever dreamed of is<br />becoming a famous author. He<br />wants to write just like his favorite<br />author Boyd Henshaw. After his<br />teach assigns a letter-writing<br />activity, Mr. Henshaw and Leigh<br />become pen pals. Leigh has a<br />rough time with his traveling<br />father, lost dog and stolen<br />lunches. <br />
  35. 35. The Tale of DespereauxNewbery Award<br />In the Classroom<br />Can be used to compare<br />and contrast with the movie<br />version.<br />Can be used to discuss point<br />of view because the story is<br />told from three different<br />characters.<br />ESOL<br />Scenes are pictured<br />throughout the book to<br />assist the text.<br />Teacher can use it as a read<br />aloud to ensure<br />comprehension. <br />Written by Kate DiCamillo<br />Illustrated by Timothy Basil Ering<br />Intermediate<br />Newbery (2004)<br />Despereaux is unlike any other<br />mouse. He hears and smells<br />things others cannot. He even<br />loves humans, one in particular.<br />He then goes on quite the<br />adventure down in the<br />dungeon full of rats. He has to<br />save the princess before it’s too<br />late. In the end, Despereaux<br />turns out to be one heroic<br />mouse.<br />
  36. 36. A Wreath for Emmett TillCoretta Scott King Award<br />In the Classroom<br />Can be used to show various<br />types and styles of poetry.<br />Students can see another way to<br />write a person’s biography, and<br />can compile a collection of<br />poems describing their own life.<br />ESOL<br />Teachers can assign a few poems<br />at a time, therefore not straining<br />the reader.<br />Every poem is presented with a<br />very descriptive image.<br />Written by Marilyn Nelson<br />Illustrated by Philippe Lardy<br />Intermediate<br />Coretta Scott King Award (2006)<br />This book is a collection of poems.<br />They depict the life and death of<br />a young boy, Emmet Till. He was<br />growing up in a racist world which<br />was full of hate, sadly he was<br />killed. This collection incorporates<br />the author’s poems as well as<br />Shakespeare&apos;s poems. <br />
  37. 37. Mister SeahorseLaura Ingalls Wilder Award<br />Written by Eric Carle<br />Illustrated by Eric Carle<br />Primary<br />Laura Ingalls Wilder Award (2003)<br /> Mrs. Seahorse has laid her eggs andMister Seahorse is taking care of them until they hatch. He travels and sees various fathers of the ocean who are also carrying their own eggs. His eggs hatch and he has a group of little seahorse babies. <br />In the Classroom<br />While learning about animals and<br />their offspring, this book can teach<br />about various male animals that<br />carry their young.<br />Can serve as a writing prompt: If<br />you were Mister Seahorse, who<br />would you see on our journey?<br />ESOL<br />The illustrations detail each animal<br />and assist the story.<br />Introduce new vocabulary<br />connected with the illustrations.<br />
  38. 38. Poetry<br />
  39. 39. Alphabet Break<br />I&apos;m learning all my ABC&apos;s,<br />I&apos;m good at D, E, F and G&apos;s.<br /> I&apos;ve mastered H and I and<br />J, and memorized the letter<br />K. I&apos;ve studied L, M, N and O<br />but now I really have to go. <br />Before I learn one more, you<br />see, I really must get up to P. -Kenn Nesbitt<br />Element: rhyme, pun<br />Primary<br />
  40. 40. Noise Day<br />Let’s have one day for girls and boysesWhen you can make the grandest noises.Screech, scream, clang a bell,Sneeze– – hiccup– – whistle– – shout,Laugh until your lungs wear out,Toot a whistle, kick a can,Bang a spoon against a pan,Sing, yodel, bellow, hum,Blow a horn, beat a drum,Rattle a window, slam a door,Scrape a rake across the floor, Use a drill, drive a nail,<br />Turn the hose on the garbage pail,<br />Shout Yahoo– – Hurrah– – Hooray,<br />Turn up the music all the way,<br />Try and bounce your bowling ball,<br />Ride a skateboard up the wall,<br />Chomp your food with a smack<br />and a slurp,<br />Chew– – chomp– – hiccup– –<br />burp.<br />One day a year do all of these,<br />The rest of the days– – be quiet<br />please. <br />-Shel Silverstein<br />Element: rhyme, onomatopoeia<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />
  41. 41. The Homework Machine<br />The Homework Machine, oh the Homework Machine, Most perfect contraption that&apos;s ever been seen. Just put in your homework, then drop in a dime, Snap on the switch, and in ten seconds&apos; time, Your homework comes out, quick and clean as can be. Here it is--&quot;nine plus four?&quot; and the answer is &quot;three.&quot; Three? Oh me . . . I guess it&apos;s not as perfect  As I thought it would be. <br /> -Shel Silverstein<br />Element: rhyme<br />Intermediate<br />
  42. 42. Purple Orangutans<br />Element: rhyme, alliteration, image, personification<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />Purple orangutans hurtle through space,<br />Silvery unicorns gallop in place, <br />Onions run races with noodles and spoons, <br />Monkeys emerge from enormous cocoons. <br />Turtles wear sweaters, and pickles wear wigs, <br />Talking tomatoes give lectures to pigs, <br />Peanut-size elephants flutter their wings, <br />Cantaloupes dance as a pineapple sings.<br />Bison ride bicycles, tiger fly kites, <br />Pelicans flicker their myriad lights, <br />Feathery fishes float high in the air, <br />Radishes wash their luxurious hair. <br />Rabbits and parrots play tag in the stars, <br />Marshmallows march in the meadows of<br />Mars… <br />These are a few of the wonders I find <br />In the magic museum I keep in my mind. <br /> -Jack Prelutskey<br />
  43. 43. Today is not a good day<br />Today is not a good day. <br />I woke up sick in bed.<br />My stomach has a stabbing pain<br />that’s spreading to my head.<br />My knees are weak and achy.<br />My eyes are full of flu.<br />I fear I may contaminate;<br />I have a fever too.<br />I cannot see.<br />I cannot breathe. <br />I cannot read or write.<br />My eyes are shut.<br />My nose is blocked.<br />I’m not a pretty sight.<br />I cannot lift a finger<br />or move a tired toe.<br />My throat is hot and scratchy.<br />The answer’s simply NO . . .<br />I cannot go to school today;<br />I’m awfully sorry too,<br />this had to happen on the day<br />my book report was due. <br />-Rebecca Kai Dotlich<br />Element: rhyme<br />Intermediate<br />
  44. 44. I Dreamed I was Riding a Zebra<br />I dreamed I was riding a zebra<br />with curly pink hair on his head <br />and when I woke up in the<br />morning that zebra was there in<br />my bed. I rode into school on my<br />zebra. It caused all the teachers<br />to scream. But then I was slightly<br />embarrassed to find it was still just<br />a dream. I woke up again in my<br />bedroom, and saw with relief and<br />a laugh I don&apos;t have a pink<br />headed zebra. I guess I&apos;ll just ride<br />the giraffe.<br /> -Kenn Nesbitt<br />Element: rhyme, image<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />
  45. 45. Keep a Poem in Your Pocket<br />Keep a poem in your pocket  <br />and a picture in your head  <br />and you&apos;ll never feel lonely at<br />night when you&apos;re in bed. <br />The little poem will sing to you  <br />the little picture bring to you  <br />a dozen dreams to dance to you  <br />at night when you&apos;re in bed.  <br />So– <br />Keep a picture in your pocket  <br />and a poem in your head  <br />and you&apos;ll never be lonely at<br />night when you&apos;re in bed<br />-Beatrice Schenk de Regniers<br />Element: rhyme<br />Intermediate <br />
  46. 46. What I’ve Learned at School<br />At school I’ve learned a lot of things<br />I really like to do,<br />like running in the hallway<br />and eating gobs of glue.<br />I’ve learned I’m good at making pencils<br />dangle from my nose.<br />I’ve learned to hum and pop my gum.<br />I practice, and it shows.<br />I’ve learned I like to cut in line<br />and love to cut the cheese.<br />I’ve learned to fake a burp, a cough,<br />and even fake a sneeze. You’d think with<br />all this learning I’d be doing well in<br />school, but everything I learn to do<br />appears to break a rule.<br />-By Robert Pottle<br />Element: rhyme, image<br />Intermediate<br />
  47. 47. Isaac Newton<br />Sir Isaac Newton sure was<br />smart,<br />beneath the apple tree.<br />When one fell off and hit his<br />head,<br />he said, “Wow, gravity.”<br />For Newton was a genius<br />and not a common slouch.<br />A genius cries “Gravity!”<br />Most others just say “ouch!” by Calvin Miller <br />Element: rhyme, onomatopoeia<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />
  48. 48. Under the Bed<br />Element: rhyme, image<br />Primary<br />There’s a terrible green<br />Monster who lives beneath my<br />bed. I hear his long white teeth<br />click. He’s waiting to be fed.<br />I shiver underneath my sheets<br />and squeeze my eyes up tight.<br />Maybe if I lie real still<br />he won’t eat me tonight…<br />He taps me on the shoulder.<br />I don’t know what to do.<br />He looks at me and says, “I’m<br />scared! Can I get in with you?”<br />-By Penny Trzynka<br />

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