Pauline Fitterer Presentation

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Pauline Fitterer Presentation

  1. 1. Pauline FittererLae 3414<br />Children’s Literature Presentation<br />
  2. 2. Graphic Novel<br />Title: The Magic School Bus: The Wild Leaf Ride<br />Author: Judith Stamper<br />Illustrator: Carilyn Bracken<br />Primary<br />Summary: In the beginning of the book a new student joins the class, they are excited to learn about fall. Ms. Frizzle’s class goes on an informative imaginary trip as passengers on Fall leaves. In the end the children learn a lot about the fall and return safety to the school.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. to introduce a new topic in a different /fun way.<br /> 2.To open and create a dialogue about science.<br />ESOL: Give the ELL student a copy of the high frequency words in the story and discuss them prior to reading the text.<br />
  3. 3. Biography<br />Title: My Dream of Martin Luther King<br />Author: Faith Ringgold<br />Illustrator: Faith Ringgold<br />Primary<br />Summary: This book is about a child who has a dream about MLK and his work as a Civil Rights leader. The dream help the child conclude that all good things start with a dream.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. to expose students to important people in US history<br /> 2.To open and create a dialogue about Black History Month.<br />ESOL: This book can be used to help explain the racial tension of the 1960. In the back of the book in a timeline that can be given to the ELL student. <br />
  4. 4. AutobiographyChinese Cinderella<br />Author: Adeline Yen Mah<br />Intermediate<br />Summary: this is a memoir of Adeline childhood growing up in a household where she felt unloved and unwanted<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. Literature Circles<br /> 2. Writer workshop<br />ESOL: I would find photos from the 1940 of Chinese Households to help the student understand the story better. <br />
  5. 5. Informational : My Healthy Food Pyramid<br />Author: Diane H. Pappas & Richard D. Covey <br />Illustrator: Ric Estrada<br />Primary<br />Summary: this book Illustrates in a simple clear the appropriate types of food kids should be eating<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. This can be a get supplement to introduce or review the food pyramid<br /> 2. this book is a good example of how informational books can be interesting and fun to read. <br />ESOL: I would add more pictures and examples of the different types of food in the book for the ELL student to see or taste.<br />
  6. 6. Informational: Adapt or Die: How Animals Stay Alive<br />Author: Lynette Evans<br />Illustrator: Matthew Alexander<br />Intermediate<br />Summary: It is an informative book on how animals survive and adapt to their environment.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. This can be a get supplement to introduce or review the animals and evidence of evolution.<br /> 2. This book is a good example of how informational books can be interesting and fun to read.<br /> 3. Great introduction to how to read and navigate a textbook. <br />ESOL: I would look for animals hat they are familiar to help explain the key concepts in the back of the book.<br />
  7. 7. Culturally Diverse: This Next New Year<br />Author: Janet S. Wong<br />Illustrator: Yangsook Choi<br />Primary<br />Summary: This is a cute story of a boy who was preparing himself for New Year.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. This book introduces how many people celebrate the Chinese New Year. Let the children know that it is ok to celebrate all holidays.<br /> 2. I think this book would be great to use to introduce a new art project or talk about writing about themselves.<br />ESOL: As I read this book I will point out he different scene so they could follow along. <br />
  8. 8. Culturally Diverse: Nadia the Willful<br />Author: Sue Alexander<br />Illustrator: Lloyd Bloom<br />Primary<br />Summary: Nadia is a girl who is having a hard time dealing with the loss of her beloved brother and through her loss helps the community celebrate his life.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. Read Aloud<br /> 2. Introduction to the Middle East during history<br />ESOL: I would have a world map out in the class to explain where this story takes place. <br />
  9. 9. Fantasy: TraditionalThe Little Red Hen<br />Author: (retold by Scholastic)<br />Illustrator: Lucinda Mc Queen <br />Primary<br />Summary: The classic story of the little red hen doing all the work and reaping all the benefits.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. read aloud<br /> 2. Comparative text<br />ESOL: I will have the class read the story and then we will make bread in the classroom.<br />
  10. 10. Fantasy: TraditionalThe Three Little Pigs<br />Author: Disney<br />Illustrator: Disney<br />Primary<br />Summary: Traditional story of the three little pigs.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. read aloud <br /> 2. reader theater<br />ESOL: I will find the short video on the story.<br />
  11. 11. Fantasy: Traditional<br />Author: Disney<br />Illustrator: Disney<br />Primary<br />Summary: Disney version of the story<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. read aloud <br /> 2. reader theater<br />ESOL: I will find the video on the story.<br />
  12. 12. Fantasy: ModernClick, Clack, Moo Cows That Type<br />Author: Doreen Cronin<br />Illustrator: Betsy Lewin<br />Primary<br />Summary: The farm animals send Farmer brown a letter with demands and withhold milk and egg until their demands are met.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. Read Aloud<br /> 2. Reader theater<br />ESOL: I would explain that farm animal really can’t do those things in the book. I would try and find an old fashion typewriter and have them play with it.<br />
  13. 13. Fiction: ABCAlphabet Adventure<br />Author: Audrey Wood<br />Illustrator: Bruce Wood<br />Primary<br />Summary: A fun way to introduce how letters in the alphabet become a word<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. read aloud<br /> 2. Introduction to forming words<br />ESOL: I would give the student magnet letters and have them pick out the letters in the story<br />
  14. 14. Fiction: ABCChickaChicka Boom Boom<br />Author: Bill Martin Jr. & John Archambault<br />Illustrator: Lois Ehlert<br />Primary<br />Summary: A different way to remember the alphabet.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. read aloud<br /> 2. Introduction to the letters and sound<br />ESOL: I will have the book on CD available at the listening center<br />
  15. 15. Fiction: PredictableIf You Take a Mouse to School<br />Author: Laura Numeroff<br />Illustrator: Felicia Bond<br />Primary<br />Summary: If you take a mouse to school he’ll want to be treated like any other student.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. read aloud<br /> 2. writing workshop<br />ESOL: I would try to bring in some of the items that mouse had in the story, or even a mouse, if allowed by the school.<br />
  16. 16. Fiction: PredictableIf You Take a Mouse To the Movies<br />Author: Laura Numeroff<br />Illustrator: Felicia Bond<br />Primary<br />Summary: If you take a Mouse to the movies he will want to be treated like a boy.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. read aloud<br /> 2. writing workshop<br />ESOL: I would try to bring in some of the items that mouse had in the story, or even a mouse, if allowed by the school.<br />
  17. 17. Fiction: Historical FictionStone Fox<br />Author: John Reynolds<br />Illustrator: Maria Sewell<br />Intermediate<br />Summary: This is about a boy who wants to help his grandfather pay the back taxes on the farm by entering a race.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. Literature Circles<br /> 2. Writers workshop<br />ESOL: Visual aids to help promote understanding<br />
  18. 18. Fiction: Historical FictionWhere the Red Fern Grows<br />Author: Wilson Rawls<br />Illustrator:<br />Intermediate<br />Summary: Boys journey into becoming the best coon hunting team in the state. <br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. Literature circle<br /> 2. Group discussion<br />ESOL: I would show the movie<br />
  19. 19. Fiction: Rhythm, Rhyme & RepetitionThe Flea’s Sneeze<br />Author: Lynn Downey<br />Illustrator: Karla Firehammer<br />Primary<br />Summary: A flea is not feeling well and none of the other barnyard animals notice until he sneezes and wakes everyone up.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. read aloud<br /> 2. a min-lesson on cold season.<br />ESOL: I would have the students repeat the phrase as I point to each animal.<br />
  20. 20. Fiction: Rhythm, Rhyme & RepetitionThe House that Jack Built<br />Author: Diana Mayo<br />Illustrator: <br />Primary<br />Summary:<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. Read Aloud <br /> 2. Lesson on Sequence<br />ESOL: I will have available the book on CD at the listening center<br />
  21. 21. Fiction: WordlessTuesday<br />Author: David Wiesner<br />Illustrator: David Wiesner<br />Primary/ Intermediate<br />Summary: Tells a story about a wild night out with frogs followed by next Tuesday with Pigs.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. This is a great book to have student use pictures to predict that story.<br /> 2. Students can take turns talking about <br />ESOL: I would have the ELL student point out different things in the book and have them repeat the word after me. <br />
  22. 22. Fiction: Beginning Chapter SeriesJunie B. Jones<br />Author: Barbara Park<br />Illustrator: Denise Brunkus<br />Primary/ Intermediate<br />Summary: Junie B a kinder garter with an active imagination that takes her on many adventures throughout the series. <br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. I would use it as a read aloud to introduce a chapter book<br /> 2. I would use this book to illustrate how some children how wild imaginations<br />ESOL: After each chapter I would have the students draw a picture to explain what happened and share it with a partner.<br />
  23. 23. Fiction: Beginner Chapter SeriesBlack Lagoon Adventure<br />Author: Mike Thaler<br />Illustrator: Jared Lee<br />Primary<br />Summary: This is an adventure series for students to laugh at school and groom their imaginations.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. Read Aloud (before a class trip)<br /> 2. Great review about rules before going on a class trip.<br />ESOL: Explain to the ELL student that this book is not how real class trips are but the kind of class trip the student would want to go on.<br />
  24. 24. Fiction: Contemporary RealisticBridge to Terabithia<br />Author: Katherine Paterson<br />Illustrator: Donna Diamond<br />Newbery Award (1978)<br />Intermediate<br />Summary: This story is about two kids who at first don’t like each other but grow very close to each other. In the end one of the main characters Jess has to face the loss of Leslie<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. Literature Circles<br /> 2. Writing reflections<br />ESOL:<br />I would show the movie at the end of the unit to help the ELL student have a deeper understanding of the topics.<br />
  25. 25. Fiction: Contemporary RealisticManiac Magee<br />Author: Jerry Spinelli<br />Intermediate<br />Newbery Award (1991)<br />Summary: A homeless boy runs away and deals with racial segregation and finding a family of his own.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. Literature Circle<br /> 2. Writing reflection<br />ESOL: I would pair read an ELL student with a strong reader and give them more time to discuss the chapters<br />
  26. 26. Caldecott AwardHenry’s Freedom Box: A True Story of the Underground Railroad<br />Author: Ellen Levine<br />Illustrator: Kadir Nelson<br />Award Year: 2008<br />Primary/intermediate<br />Summary: It is a about Henry a boy who grow up as a slave and when his family is sold to another master he joins the underground railroad towards his freedom<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. Read Aloud as an introduction to Slavery<br /> 2. Read Aloud as an introduction to Civil War<br />ESOL:<br />I would also provide the ELL student with actual pictures of slaves during the Civil War.<br />
  27. 27. Caldecott Award<br />Author:Chris Van Allsburg<br />Illustrator: Chris Van Allsburg<br />Award Year: (1986)<br />Primary<br />Summary: This is a story about a boy who lost his faith in Christmas<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. read aloud <br /> 2. class discussion <br />ESOL: I would show the movie Polar Express to the class after reading it<br />
  28. 28. Newbery Award: The Family Under the Bridge<br />Author: Natalie Savage Carlson<br />Illustrator: Garth Williams<br />Award Year: (1959)<br />Intermediate<br />Summary: This is a cute book about a grumpy old man who puts down his guard and allows himself to love a few homeless children.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. Literature Circle: I would use this book as an introduction to my classes first literature circle.<br /> 2. Read aloud<br />ESOL: I think that this book is great for ELL students because in the book it make references to learning how to read and write and this would be a great place to have literature discussion with them<br />
  29. 29. Newbery AwardThe Giver<br />Author: Lois Lowry<br />Award Year: (1994)<br />Intermediate<br />Summary: Boy struggles with his new role in a community that he discovers is not what it appears to be on the surface and he has to make a life altering decision.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. Literature Circles<br /> 2. Writers Workshop<br />ESOL: I would have a ELL student pair read every other chapter to have them check their understand of the chapter.<br />
  30. 30. Coretta Scott King Award<br />Author:<br />Illustrator:<br />Award Year: (1992)<br />Primary/Intermediate<br />Summary: This picture book is about a girl who flies over the roof tops of Harlem in 1939<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. Read Aloud <br /> 2. writers workshop (ask the students to create a project describing there neighborhood from the sky) <br />ESOL: I would include visual aid of Harlem and other area maps.<br />
  31. 31. Parents’ Choice Award: Ring of Earth<br />Author: Jane Yolen<br />Illustrator: John Wallner<br />Award Year: (1987)<br />Primary/ Intermediate<br />Summary: It is a poetry book for children about the seasons.<br />Classroom Use: <br /> 1. Read Aloud to introduce a new seasons to the class.<br /> 2. Introduction or example of poetry<br />ESOL: I would make sure that I was pointing out and demonstrating the actions or references made in each poem. <br />
  32. 32. Poetry<br />
  33. 33. Aunt Sue’s Stories<br />Author: Langston Hughes<br />Source:<br />Poetic Element: Rhyme<br />Aunt Sue has a head full of stories.<br />Aunt Sue has a whole heart full of stories.<br />Summer nights on the front porch<br />Aunt Sue cuddles a brown-faced child to her<br />bosom<br />And tells him stories.<br />Black slaves<br />Working in the hot sun,<br />And black slaves<br />Walking in the dewy<br />night,<br />10 And black slaves<br />Singing sorrow songs on the banks of a mighty river<br />Mingle themselves softly<br />In the flow of old Aunt Sue&apos;s voice,<br />Mingle themselves softly<br />15 In the dark shadows that cross and<br />recross<br />Aunt Sue&apos;s stories.<br />And the dark-faced child, listening,<br />Knows that Aunt Sue&apos;s stories are real stories.<br />He knows that Aunt Sue never got her stories<br />20 Out of any book at all,<br />But that they came<br />Right out of her own life.<br />The dark-faced child is quiet<br />Of a summer night<br />Listening to Aunt Sue&apos;s stories.<br />
  34. 34. Aunt Sue’s Stories<br />Author: Langston Hughes<br />Source:<br />Poetic Element: repetition<br />Aunt Sue has a head full of stories.<br />Aunt Sue has a whole heart full of stories.<br />Summer nights on the front porch<br />Aunt Sue cuddles a brown-faced child to her<br />bosom<br />And tells him stories.<br />Black slaves<br />Working in the hot sun,<br />And black slaves<br />Walking in the dewy<br />night,<br />10 And black slaves<br />Singing sorrow songs on the banks of a mighty river<br />Mingle themselves softly<br />In the flow of old Aunt Sue&apos;s voice,<br />Mingle themselves softly<br />15 In the dark shadows that cross and<br />recross<br />Aunt Sue&apos;s stories.<br />And the dark-faced child, listening,<br />Knows that Aunt Sue&apos;s stories are real stories.<br />He knows that Aunt Sue never got her stories<br />20 Out of any book at all,<br />But that they came<br />Right out of her own life.<br />The dark-faced child is quiet<br />Of a summer night<br />Listening to Aunt Sue&apos;s stories.<br />
  35. 35. Contraction DISSATISFACTION<br />Author: Alan Katz<br />Source:<br />Poetic Element: Rhyme<br />It wasn’t isn’t<br />It isn’t wasn’t<br />It can’t be shouldn’t <br />It shouldn’t be doesn’t <br />It mustn’t be wouldn’t<br />It wouldn’t be mustn’t<br />It mightn’t be mayn’t<br />I’m skipping this homework to go out and playn’t<br />
  36. 36. Answer’s to a child’s Question<br />Author: Samuel Taylor Coleridge<br />Source:<br />Poetic Element: Rhyme<br /> Do you ask what the birds say? The Sparrow, the Dove,The Linnet and Thrush say, &quot;I love and I love!&quot;In the winter they&apos;re silent--the wind is so strong;What it says, I don&apos;t know, but it sings a loud song.But green leaves, and blossoms, and sunny warm weather,And singing, and loving-all come back together.But the Lark is so brimful of gladness and love,The green fields below him, the blue sky above,That he sings, and he sings; and for ever sings he--&quot;I love my Love, and my Love loves me!&quot;<br />
  37. 37. I’m Nobody<br />Author: Emily Dickson<br />Source:<br />Poetic Element: Rhyme<br />I&apos;m nobody! Who are you?Are you nobody, too?Then there&apos;s a pair of us — don&apos;t tell!They&apos;d banish us, you know. How dreary to be somebody!How public, like a frogTo tell your name the livelong dayTo an admiring bog!<br />
  38. 38. Through the Metidj to Aba-el-kaidr<br />Author: Robert Browning<br />Source:<br />Poetic Element: Rhyme<br />As I ride, as I ride <br />With a full heart as my guide <br />So its tide rocks my side<br />As I ride, as I ride <br />That, as I were doubled-eyed, <br />He in whom our tribes confide, <br />Is described, ways untried<br />As I ride, as I ride <br />
  39. 39. A time to talk<br />Author: Robert frost<br />Source:<br />Poetic Element:Rhyme<br />When a friend calls to me from the road And slows his horse to a meaning walk, I don&apos;t stand still and look around On all the hills I haven&apos;t hoed, And shout from where I am, What is it? No, not as there is a time to talk. I thrust my hoe in the mellow ground, Blade-end up and five feet tall, And plod: I go up to the stone wallFor a friendly visit. <br />
  40. 40. O Captain! My Captain!<br />Author: Walt Whitman<br />Source:<br />Poetic Element:Rhyme and repetition<br />O Captain my Captain! our fearful trip is done,The ship has weathered every rack, the prize we sought is won,The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;But O heart! heart! heart!O the bleeding drops of red,Where on the deck my Captain lies,Fallen cold and dead.O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;Rise up--for you the flag is flung for you the bugle trills,For you bouquets and ribboned wreaths for you the shores a-crowding,For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;Here Captain! dear father!This arm beneath your head!It is some dream that on the deck,You&apos;ve fallen cold and dead.My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;The ship is anchored safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won;Exult O shores, and ring O bells!But I, with mournful tread,Walk the deck my Captain lies,Fallen cold and dead.<br />
  41. 41. ‘Tis the voice of the Lobster<br />Author: Lewis Carroll<br />Source:<br />Poetic Element: rhyme<br />&quot;&apos;Tis the voice of the Lobster: I heard him declare &apos;You have baked me too brown, I must sugar my hair.&apos; As a duck with its eyelids, so he with his nose Trims his belt and his buttons, and turns out his toes. When the sands are all dry, he is gay as a lark, And will talk in contemptuous tones of the Shark: But, when the tide rises and sharks are around, His voice has a timid and tremulous sound.&quot; <br />
  42. 42. The Thousandth Man<br />Author: Rudyard Kipling<br />Source:<br />Poetic Element: Rhyme<br />One man in a thousand, Solomon says,Will stick more close than a brother.And it&apos;s worth while seeking him half your daysIf you find him before the other.Nine hundred and ninety-nine dependOn what the world sees in you,But the Thousandth man will stand your friendWith the whole round world agin you.<br />
  43. 43. Harlem Hopscotch<br />Author: Maya Angelou<br />Source:<br />Poetic element: Rhyme<br />One foot down, then hop!  It’s hot.    Good things for the ones that’s got.Another jump, now to the left.    Everybody for hisself. <br />In the air, now both feet down.    Since you black, don’t stick around.Food is gone, the rent is due,    Curse and cry and then jump two. <br />All the people out of work,    Hold for three, then twist and jerk.Cross the line, they count you out.    That’s what hopping’s all about. <br />Both feet flat, the game is done.They think I lost. I think I won. <br />

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