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Reading Response Project LAE 3414 Summer B, 2009 By: Nikki Spicer
Graphic Novel
<ul><li>Book Title: The Sinking of the Titanic </li></ul><ul><li>Author: Matt Doeden </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrator: Charle...
Non Fiction
<ul><li>Book Title: A Picture book of Thomas Alva Edison </li></ul><ul><li>Author: David. A. Adler </li></ul><ul><li>Illus...
<ul><li>Book Title: I’m Still Scared; The War Years </li></ul><ul><li>Author: Tomie DePaola </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrator:...
<ul><li>Book Title: Garden Friends </li></ul><ul><li>Series Editor: Deborah Lock </li></ul><ul><li>Senior Art Editor: Tory...
<ul><li>Book Title: The Magic School Bus; Explores the Senses </li></ul><ul><li>Authors: Joanna Cole </li></ul><ul><li>Ill...
Culturally Diverse
Book Title: Bread, Bread, Bread Author: Ann Morris Photographs By: Ken Heyman Genre: Culturally Diverse Award/Year: none P...
Book Title: Dora the Explorer; Shake it up!  Storybook with Maracas Adapted By: Ruth Koeppel Illustrator: Steven Savitsky ...
Fantasy
Book Title: Rapunzel Author: (As Retold) Paul Zelinsky Illustrator: Paul Zelinsky Genre: Traditional Fantasy Award/Year: n...
Book Title: The Girl Who Spun Gold Author: Virginia Hamilton Illustrator: Leo and Diane Dillon Genre: Traditional Fantasy ...
Book Title: Hansel and Gretel Author: (Retold by) Rika Lesser Illustrator: Paul Zelinsky Genre: Traditional Fantasy Award/...
Book Title: Twilight Author: Stephanie Meyer Illustrator: none Genre: Science Fiction Award/Year: none Intermediate Summar...
Fiction
Book Title: ABC Author: Dr. Seuss Illustrator: Dr. Seuss Genre: Fiction/ABC Award/Year: none Primary Summary of Book: The ...
Book Title: Winnie-the-Pooh’s ABC Inspired By: A. A. Milne Illustrator: Ernest H. Shepard Genre: Fiction/ABC Award/Year: n...
Book Title: Make Way for Ducklings Author: Robert McCloskey Illustrator: Robert McCloskey Genre: Fiction/Predictable Award...
Book Title: Goodnight Moon Author: Margaret Wise Brown Illustrator: Clement Hurd Genre: Fiction/Predictable Award/Year: no...
Book Title: Titanicat Author: Marty Crisp Illustrator: Robert Papp Genre: Fiction/ Historical Award/Year: none Primary Sum...
Book Title: The Scarab’s Secret Author: Nick Would Illustrator: Christina Balit Genre: Fiction/ Historical Award/Year: non...
Book Title: Finger Rhymes Author: (Collected By) Marc Brown Illustrator: Marc Brown Genre: Fiction/ Rhythm, Rhyme, and Rep...
Book Title: The Foot Book Author: Dr. Seuss Illustrator: Dr. Seuss Genre: Fiction/ Rhythm, Rhyme, and Repetition Award/Yea...
Book Title: The Red String Author: (Conceived By) Margot Blair Illustrator: Greg Colson Genre: Fiction/ Wordless Award/Yea...
Book Title: Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing (The First of “The Fudge” Books) Author: Judy Blume Illustrator: Roy Doty Genr...
Book Title: Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus Author: Barbara Park Illustrator: Denise Brunkus Genre: Fiction/Begin...
Book Title: Because of Winn Dixie Author: Kate DiCamillo Illustrator: none Genre: Fiction/ Contemporary Realistic Award/Ye...
Book Title: Little Women Author: Louisa May Alcott Illustrator: Jame’s Prunier Genre: Fiction/ Contemporary Realistic Awar...
Award Books
Book Title: Make Way for Ducklings Author: Robert McCloskey Illustrator: Robert McCloskey Genre: Award Book Award/Year: Ca...
Book Title: Olivia Author: Ian Falconer Illustrator: Ian Falconer Genre: Award Book Award/Year: Caldecott, 2001 Primary Su...
Book Title: Because of Winn Dixie Author: Kate DiCamillo Illustrator: None Genre: Award Book Award/Year: Newbery Award;  I...
Book Title: Number the Stars Author: Lois Lowry Illustrator: None Genre: Award Book Award/Year: Newbery Award; 1990 Primar...
Book Title: Bud, Not Buddy Author: Christopher Paul Curtis Illustrator: None Genre: Award Book Award/Year: Coretta Scott K...
Book Title: New Moon Author: Stephanie Meyer Illustrator: None Genre: Award Book Award/Year: Young Reader’s Choice Award I...
Poetry
Title: What I Like Author: Dean Koontz Poetic Element: Onomatopoeia Illustrator: Phil Parks I like the way snakes wiggle I...
Title: Listen to the Wind Author: Dean Koontz Poetic Element: Personification Illustrated By: Phil Parks Listen to the win...
Title: Reflection Author: Jane Yolen Poetic Element: Metaphore Photographs By: Jason Semple Water is a magic mirror Showin...
Title: Embroidery Author: Jane Yolen Poetic Element: Metaphore Photographs By: Jason Semple On this green loom, In this we...
Title: What did? Author: Shel Silverstein Illustrator: Shel Silverstein Poetic Element: Pun What did the carrot say to the...
Title: The Little Boy and the Old Man Author: Shel Silverstein Poetic Element: Rhyme Illustrator: Shel Silverstein Said th...
Title: How Now, Brown Cow? Author: Alice Schertle Poetic Element: Rhyme Illustrator: Amanda Schaffer  How Now, Brown Cow? ...
Title: Consider Cow Author: Alice Schertle Poetic Element: Pun Illustrator: Amanda Schaffer  Consider cow Which rhymes Wit...
Title: Old, Cold Pizza Author: Loris Lesynski Poetic Element: Personification Illustrator: Loris Lesynski Old, cold pizza....
Title: A Patch of Old Snow Author: Robert Frost Poetic Element: Image Illustrator: Henri Sorensen There’s a patch of old s...
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Complete Reading Response Project - Nikki Spicer

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Transcript of "Complete Reading Response Project - Nikki Spicer"

  1. 1. Reading Response Project LAE 3414 Summer B, 2009 By: Nikki Spicer
  2. 2. Graphic Novel
  3. 3. <ul><li>Book Title: The Sinking of the Titanic </li></ul><ul><li>Author: Matt Doeden </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrator: Charles Barnett III and Phil Miller </li></ul><ul><li>Genre: Nonfiction, Informational </li></ul><ul><li>Year: 2005 </li></ul><ul><li>Best for: Primary Readers </li></ul><ul><li>Book Summary: </li></ul><ul><li>The grand voyage of ship, Titanic, begins, historical figures are introduced to the reader, and the beauty, extravagance, and divided social classes of the ship are relayed through illustrations. </li></ul><ul><li>The ship collides with an iceberg, and some of the problems that occurred which caused the ship to sink are revealed. Panic is shown well in the illustrations as well as commentary. </li></ul><ul><li>Many have been lost, the ship has sunk, and the ship Carpathia arrives to save the remaining passengers in water and in lifeboats. </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom Use: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Insight for a book report </li></ul><ul><li>2. Inspiration for a timeline </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL Applications/Modifications: Graphic novels help ESOL students follow along with a story. In this graphic novel, the elaborate pictures depicting the actions of the characters and the facial expressions presented with the captions are a great lead for ESOL students to help in comprehending this event that took place in history. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Non Fiction
  5. 5. <ul><li>Book Title: A Picture book of Thomas Alva Edison </li></ul><ul><li>Author: David. A. Adler </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrator: John Wallner </li></ul><ul><li>Genre: Nonfiction/Biography </li></ul><ul><li>Award/Year: none </li></ul><ul><li>Primary </li></ul><ul><li>Summary of Book: A great introduction to Thomas Edison for young readers. Some of his major accomplishments are discussed, such as his invention of the phonograph, and inventing the first movie camera. The book also includes a timeline of important dates. </li></ul><ul><li>Suggestions for classroom use: Resource for creating either a timeline of Edison’s life accomplishments and inventions, or an essay. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL Applications/Modifications: The timeline in this book will help ESOL students to understand the life of Thomas Edison better in a chronological form, and the Illustrations provided will help learners to comprehend visually. </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Book Title: I’m Still Scared; The War Years </li></ul><ul><li>Author: Tomie DePaola </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrator: Tomie DePaola </li></ul><ul><li>Genre: Nonfiction/Autobiography </li></ul><ul><li>Award/Year: none </li></ul><ul><li>Primary </li></ul><ul><li>Summary of Book: This is a book that author, Tomie DePaola wrote about from his childhood experiences that took place after Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Tomie shares actual journal entries of his own, some including how he heard President Roosevelt make speeches on the radio, how school changed by including more precautionary drills, and instances where his mother even put “blackout curtains” on their windows at home so that enemy airplanes with bombs wouldn’t see their light through windows as a target. The book ends with one last journal entry from Tomie, saying that he is still scared. </li></ul><ul><li>Suggestions for classroom use: Students could use this book as inspiration to create a life map of their life. Students could then turn it into their own autobiography. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL Applications/Modifications: The teacher could model a personally written autobiography of their own for guidance. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Book Title: Garden Friends </li></ul><ul><li>Series Editor: Deborah Lock </li></ul><ul><li>Senior Art Editor: Tory Gordon-Harris </li></ul><ul><li>Genre: Nonfiction/Informational </li></ul><ul><li>Award/Year: none </li></ul><ul><li>Primary </li></ul><ul><li>Summary of Book: This book is all about different bugs and tiny animals that live in gardens. Different parts of each tiny creature are labeled, and the pictures are taken close up for children to be able to study them. The book ends with a photo of a young girl looking through a magnifyiing glass, inviting the reader to explore more outside. </li></ul><ul><li>Suggestions for classroom use: Children could use the book as a reference for labeling bugs and other small creatures parts, printed out on a worksheet or to write a poem about all the different tiny creatures that live in gardens. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL Applications/Modifications: This book is fantastic for ESOL students learning the parts of bugs because there are direct labels throughout the book of their parts. The large text printed is also another modification. </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Book Title: The Magic School Bus; Explores the Senses </li></ul><ul><li>Authors: Joanna Cole </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrator: Bruce Degen </li></ul><ul><li>Genre: Nonfiction/Informational </li></ul><ul><li>Award/Year: none </li></ul><ul><li>Primary </li></ul><ul><li>Summary of Book: Mr. Wilde, the schools new assistant principal is driving the magic school bus with all the children, trying to catch up to Ms. Frizzle a few cars ahead. He presses the wrong button, and poof! The magic schoolbus kids are on another shrunken adventure, flying through the body of a nearby police officer, and exploring his bodily senses. They later enter Ms. Frizzle’s body and then return back to their normal state. </li></ul><ul><li>Suggestions for classroom use: Used as a reference for children to Trace one another’s bodily outlines on large paper and label different body parts along with their senses. Allow students to explore website activities after reading book as a center. </li></ul><ul><li>ESOL Applications/Modifications: Notes are provided on the side margins of the book with definitions of words listed. Along with text, voice bubbles are coming directly from characters with reinforcing commentary. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Culturally Diverse
  10. 10. Book Title: Bread, Bread, Bread Author: Ann Morris Photographs By: Ken Heyman Genre: Culturally Diverse Award/Year: none Primary Summary of Book: The book begins by stating that people all around the world eat bread. Different types of bread, of all shapes, sizes, and textures are referenced throughout the book, and at the end, the book conveys a message to the reader that people eat bread in fellowship, and that the reader should go and try some bread too. Suggestions for classroom use: Students could sample an unusual type of bread that originates from a different country, such as croissants from France. Students could then write and reflect about the experience of trying a new bread from another culture in their journals. ESOL Applications/Modifications: ESOL students will gain understanding, and form a connection through the sense of taste by trying bread, and connecting the word “bread” visually with its physical taste.
  11. 11. Book Title: Dora the Explorer; Shake it up! Storybook with Maracas Adapted By: Ruth Koeppel Illustrator: Steven Savitsky Genre: Culturally Diverse Award/Year: none Primary Summary of Book: The book includes cultural music, musical instruments (maracas), and Spanish words that go along with the text. Character, Dora, guides the reader through tough situations, puzzles, and obstacles that he or she must think through to get further in the book. All the while the reader participates, while listening to music that comes from the maracas, and physically keeping a rhythm with them as well. The book ends with Dora congratulating the reader for a job well done, saying “We did it!”. Suggestions for classroom use: The teacher should first set up an activity where the students can create “shakers” of their own. This book should then be used as a read aloud with students participating along with the activities in the book. ESOL Applications/Modifications: This book is a great way to introduce the Spanish culture into the classroom. Spanish ESOL students will feel a sense of cultural appreciation as they and their classmates participate in the book’s festive activities.
  12. 12. Fantasy
  13. 13. Book Title: Rapunzel Author: (As Retold) Paul Zelinsky Illustrator: Paul Zelinsky Genre: Traditional Fantasy Award/Year: none Primary Summary of Book: A man and a woman were going to have a child. The woman told the husband to fetch her the herb, rapunzel, to eat from a sourceress’ garden or she would die. He did so, and the sourceress said she would let him take the herbs back to his wife if they would give her their child. She tool the child, raised her, and put her in a tower with no doors to live in when she became a young woman. A prince later found Rapunzel, they fell in love, secretly married eachother, and she later became pregnant. The sorceress banished her to the wilderness, the prince searched for a long time, and finally found her with two twins of theirs that she had given birth to, and took her back to his castle where they lived happily ever after. Suggestions for classroom use: The story could be dramatized or turned into a reader’s theater. Children could make a diorama project out of a shoebox to represent the garden from the story. ESOL Applications/Modifications: The use of drama for the ESOL students to see will help them to better understand the story.
  14. 14. Book Title: The Girl Who Spun Gold Author: Virginia Hamilton Illustrator: Leo and Diane Dillon Genre: Traditional Fantasy Award/Year: none Primary Summary of Book: This book is very similar to the story of Rumpelstiltskin, but it is told in the version of more of an African heritage. A young girl’s mother tells a king that her daughter can spin gold from cotton. The king immediately asks for her hand in marriage, and then locks her in a room and tells her to spin the room full of gold, or he will lock her in there forever. She makes a deal with “Lit-mahn” to guess his name in three days in exchange for him to spin all the gold, or he will take her away forever to live and become one of him. She learns his name on the third day, after the king tells her a story of how he heard Lit-mahn chanting his name in the forest. She tells him his name in the end, never again to see Lit-man leaves the king, and eventually takes him back out of forgiveness and they live “fairly happily ever after”. Suggestions for classroom use: Use happy and sad emotion puppets for kids to hold up during different emotional ups and downs in the story. Names are a central part in the story, so students could look up their name meaning and write about it in their journals. ESOL Applications/Modifications: On the signs, the words “happy” and “sad” would be labeled along with the facial expression.
  15. 15. Book Title: Hansel and Gretel Author: (Retold by) Rika Lesser Illustrator: Paul Zelinsky Genre: Traditional Fantasy Award/Year: Caldecott; 1998 Primary Summary of Book: Hansel and Gretel are two children living with their parents. One night they overhear their mother telling their father that she wishes to lead them into the woods and leave them there because they do not have enough food for the children. The father does not agree, but goes along with his wishes. The first time, Hansel dropped pebbles all the way there to find his way back home with Gretel. The second time, he dropped bread crumbs and became lost. They came to an old woman’s house made of sweets, and she invited them in. She was really a witch however, who locked Hansel up to fatten and eat him. Gretel outsmarted the witch and cooked her in an oven that the witch had prepared to cook Hansel in. They took all of her jewels, found their father who said their mother had passed on, and lived happily ever after. Suggestions for classroom use: Discuss with children the importance of safety from strangers, and not to go into their homes. Have students pair up and make a “map” that Hansel could have used to get back home. ESOL Applications/Modifications: Provide a word bank of some directional words for when students create maps.
  16. 16. Book Title: Twilight Author: Stephanie Meyer Illustrator: none Genre: Science Fiction Award/Year: none Intermediate Summary of Book: This book is about a teenager named Bella Swan who has moved to a new school. Little does she know that at this new school, she is about to fall in love with a “vegetarian” vampire named Edward Cullen. After enduring several life threatening scenarios, Bella is saved from being devoured by a tracker vampire by her beloved Edward. Suggestions for classroom use: This book would best serve as a personal read for students that are in need of a book (in this case, a series) to become more “drawn in” to the idea of reading itself. It would be great for a student to use as a book presented through a PowerPoint project to the class. ESOL Applications/Modifications: This book is also written and available in a Spanish version, to accompany ESOL students needs when it comes to reading comprehension. ESOL students may also enjoy the story’s premise on how it is sometimes a struggle being uniquely different yet still very special and talented; a struggle that some of the characters face in the book as well.
  17. 17. Fiction
  18. 18. Book Title: ABC Author: Dr. Seuss Illustrator: Dr. Seuss Genre: Fiction/ABC Award/Year: none Primary Summary of Book: The book begins with the letter A, referencing “big A” and “little a” and asking the question, “What begins with A?” next, words are listed that begin with the letter “A”. This pattern goes on with all of the rest of the letters all the way to the letter “Y”, then goes through all of the ABC’s in alphabetical order until the letter “Z” is reached on the final page of the book. Suggestions for classroom use: Students could make their own “ABC” books over a period of time with Dr. Seuss’s book as a guide. The teacher should read this book as a shared reading and let the students articulate out loud the phonemic sounds of each letter as a group. ESOL Applications/Modifications: To facilitate ESOL student’s learning, this book is very colorful to the eye with large printed letters, along with rhyming and alliteration, as well as illustrations portraying words listed that start with each letter.
  19. 19. Book Title: Winnie-the-Pooh’s ABC Inspired By: A. A. Milne Illustrator: Ernest H. Shepard Genre: Fiction/ABC Award/Year: none Primary Summary of Book: The book is beautifully illustrated from beginning to end with pictures capturing the feel of those from the classic Winnie the Pooh books. The book is a board, allotting each letter of the alphabet its own page, which includes the letter in both its capital and lowercase forms, a word example that begins with that letter, and an illustration symbolizing that word for memory purposes. Suggestions for classroom use: The teacher could reference this book every time that a new letter is learned, and ask that students find something at home that begins with that letter to show and tell about at school the next day. The teacher could also read the book aloud and ask students on the spot to raise their hands to share words they know that begin with the letter the teacher is referencing. ESOL Applications/Modifications: For ESOL students, this book is very simplified and not overwhelmingly “busy” to the eye, which would aid in preventing panic and confusion to arise within the child concerning the idea of learning the English Alphabet.
  20. 20. Book Title: Make Way for Ducklings Author: Robert McCloskey Illustrator: Robert McCloskey Genre: Fiction/Predictable Award/Year: Caldecott, 1942 Primary Summary of Book: Mr. and Mrs. Mallard (ducks) are searching for a place to make their own, and lay their eggs to have babies, but they are having trouble doing that in such a busy city. They finally find a place, and make friends with a policeman named Michael who feeds them peanuts. Mrs. Mallard faces crossing a dangerous intersection with her ducklings and is lead back safely to a public garden where Mr. and Mrs. Mallard decide to stay for good. Suggestions for classroom use: This book is a good one to use to evaluate student comprehension. The teacher could do a read aloud, and probe students with questions to infer on what they think will happen next. Students could then complete a sequencing worksheet where they will cut out scenes from the book and paste them in the right order in pairs or small groups. ESOL Applications/Modifications: ESOL students may have trouble comprehending this book, because the sketches are in black and white, and the texts are larger in length and smaller in print size. For all assignments concerning this book, ESOL students should be assigned to a partner for help, guidance, and reference, and during the read aloud be pulled closest to the teacher to be able to see the book close up.
  21. 21. Book Title: Goodnight Moon Author: Margaret Wise Brown Illustrator: Clement Hurd Genre: Fiction/Predictable Award/Year: none Primary Summary of Book: This book begins in a bedroom that belongs to a little bunny that is about to fall asleep. He is lying in bed and saying goodnight to all of the objects and things he sees around him in his room. The book is predictable for children because it contains repetition of phrases and repetitive words, especially at the end where the rabbit tells each object that he saw or mentioned in the beginning “goodnight”. Suggestions for classroom use: This book allows a great opportunity for a teacher to begin by activating student’s prior knowledge. He or she should ask the students to share or think about what they do or think about before they go to bed, and then begin the reading after the students have those thoughts in mind. The teacher could also reread the book later and have students chime in aloud during the repetitive words of the book, such as with the word, “goodnight”. ESOL Applications/Modifications: During the reading, the teacher should speak at a slower pace. ESOL students are also being accommodated by hearing repetition in the text and having the opportunity to reflect first on prior knowledge before the reading.
  22. 22. Book Title: Titanicat Author: Marty Crisp Illustrator: Robert Papp Genre: Fiction/ Historical Award/Year: none Primary Summary of Book: The book is about a young boy named Jim who is working as a cabin boy on the Titanic. As he is on the ship, he adopts a stray cat that climbed aboard and her kittens. The ship hits an iceberg and Jim won’t leave for a lifeboat without saving his cat, whom he named 4-0-1, and her kittens. He whisks them away safely in the nick of time and makes it off the ship and into a lifeboat. At the end of the book he calls the cat his good luck charm and is happy to have his life. Suggestions for classroom use: Students could create a visual representation of the ship titanic. Students could also write a journal entry about them and their imaginary pet exploring the titanic. ESOL Applications/Modifications: Students could write their journal entries partly on their own, and partly with the assistance of the teacher or volunteer, who will copy those words of the story onto the paper while the student speaks them aloud orally.
  23. 23. Book Title: The Scarab’s Secret Author: Nick Would Illustrator: Christina Balit Genre: Fiction/ Historical Award/Year: none Primary Summary of Book: In this story, the scarab uncovers a mysterious plot to murder the Pharaoh, and he is determined to put an end to it. The scarab is tiny, but has a big heart and the bravery to help the Pharaoh in saving his life. This picture book depicts many aspects of ancient Egypt and delivers the key message that even the smallest are capable of being greatly impacting. Suggestions for classroom use: For comprehension purposes, children could create a 3 dimensional pyramid out of folded paper with key events labeled by number in chronological order on each side. Children could take on the role of the brave scarab in a journal entry in their writing. ESOL Applications/Modifications: Building a 3 dimensional, tangible representation such as a pyramid to record information from the story will help children to learn and retain information better visually and kinesthetically.
  24. 24. Book Title: Finger Rhymes Author: (Collected By) Marc Brown Illustrator: Marc Brown Genre: Fiction/ Rhythm, Rhyme, and Repetition Award/Year: none Primary Summary of Book: The book from beginning to end is a collection of different finger rhymes that can be used to teach children about rhyming. These include different hand signals as well, along with complete body movements which are illustrated, line by line, for the teacher to mimic while reciting. Some rhymes include, “Five Little Mice”, “Ten Little Candles”, and “Sleepy Fingers” Suggestions for classroom use: This would be a great transitional exercise to practice with children when transitioning from one subject or activity to another. It would also be a great introduction to using hands and fingers to help in mathematics for primary students. ESOL Applications/Modifications: The teacher modeling through body language, and using repetition and rhyme would help the ESOL student further comprehend the vocabulary being used.
  25. 25. Book Title: The Foot Book Author: Dr. Seuss Illustrator: Dr. Seuss Genre: Fiction/ Rhythm, Rhyme, and Repetition Award/Year: none Primary Summary of Book: This book is chocked full of rhythm, rhyme, and repetition, and illustrates to children the concept of opposites all at once. It is humorous in nature, as most of Dr. Seuss’ books are, and focuses mainly around feet, and all of the different whacky places, and states they can be placed in. The book ends with the exclamation, “Oh, how many, many feet you meet.” Suggestions for classroom use: Students will paint their feet and use them as stamps to make their own foot book. The teacher will label them either “his feet” or “her feet”, and then count how many feet there are in the whole class, then recount by 2’s. ESOL Applications/Modifications: To label “his” or “her” feet, the teacher will provide handwritten dotted letters on the students page for he or she to trace over, and then repeat orally with the teacher aloud.
  26. 26. Book Title: The Red String Author: (Conceived By) Margot Blair Illustrator: Greg Colson Genre: Fiction/ Wordless Award/Year: none Primary Summary of Book: The book begins with a red ball of yarn that falls out of a drawer, becomes a jump rope, a clothesline, a tightrope, a grasping tool for a scuba diver and a couple of astronauts, a string around a package, a red line going across a map, part of a knitted scarf, a bit of an unraveling sweater, part of a bird’s nest, a power line, a swing on a swing set, cup and string telephones, a bowl of spaghetti, a figure lined in the shape of a dog chasing a scared cat, and back into the drawer that it rolled out of. Suggestions for classroom use: For the very first time a teacher introduces a kindergartner to a guided reading session, having the student narrate each page to become more comfortable with a guided reading routine, or as a model of the beginning, middle, and end concept. ESOL Applications/Modifications: Students would benefit from this book because it is all pictures. The teacher could ask the student to say one word they know orally to describe each page during guided reading.
  27. 27. Book Title: Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing (The First of “The Fudge” Books) Author: Judy Blume Illustrator: Roy Doty Genre: Fiction/Beginning Chapter Series Award/Year: none Primary+ Summary of Book: Peter, a fourth grader, tells the story of how his brother, “Fudge” reeks havoc on his life, and all around him, from jumping off of the jungle gym and swallowing his two front teeth while Peter was supposed to be watching him, to scribbling all over Peter’s school project. In the end, Fudge even ends up swallowing Peter’s pet turtle, Dribble, and his parents give in and buy him a pet dog that he always wanted because they feel so bad about the situation with his turtle. Suggestions for classroom use: This book would be a great one to get boys interested in reading, due to it’s outrageous, gross-at-times plot that many boys would appreciate. Students could also create Acrostic poems spelling out the characters names from the book. ESOL Applications/Modifications: Students could be assigned a partner to read this book with. Also on tests, ESOL students will be given a modified amount of questions to answer.
  28. 28. Book Title: Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus Author: Barbara Park Illustrator: Denise Brunkus Genre: Fiction/Beginning Chapter Series Award/Year: none Primary Summary of Book: Junie B. is starting her first day in Kindergarten. She decides from the very beginning that she isn’t very happy when she meets the girl with the frizzy hair that she has to sit next to, on the big, stinky, yellow bus. Junie ends up getting into some trouble at school when she calls 911 because the doors to the bathroom are locked. Her mother picks her up, angry at what has happened, and tells her that she will make friends with a girl named Grace and sit with her from now on during her rides on the bus. Suggestions for classroom use: A literacy mystery box will be created for students with a pencil, star, and band-aid. Show the students these items and ask “How and why do you think Junie will use these objects?” Then read the story to show them. Encourage students to later write a letter to Author, Barbara Park. ESOL Applications/Modifications: Having students feel like they are personally relating to the author through a short letter will make learning about the books more significant. Help ESOL students extra during this writing process since they feel that the author will be reading their letter.
  29. 29. Book Title: Because of Winn Dixie Author: Kate DiCamillo Illustrator: none Genre: Fiction/ Contemporary Realistic Award/Year: Newbery Award Intermediate Summary of Book: This book is about a young girl named Opal who’s mother left her as a child, and is now living with her father, a preacher. She finds and befriends a stray dog and names him Winn Dixie (After the grocery store). Winn Dixie helps Opal meet lots of new people, and learn some of life’s most important lessons, as well as deal with internal emotions that she is faced with along the way. In the end, Opal is no longer a lonely girl, and has gained many new friends, all because of her dog, Winn Dixie. Suggestions for Classroom Use: Have students first read the book, and then view the movie made that is based on the story, and create a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast similarities and differences in the movie from the book. Do a “Sketch to Stretch” activity, where the teacher reads chapter five and the students sketch what they visualize while the chapter is being read and then write about it. ESOL Applications/Modifications: ESOL students could be allowed to preview parts of the movie before reading the book to help them better visualize the characters, settings, and plot of the story.
  30. 30. Book Title: Little Women Author: Louisa May Alcott Illustrator: Jame’s Prunier Genre: Fiction/ Contemporary Realistic Award/Year: none Intermediate Summary of Book: The structure of this book has been tweaked to aid the more contemporary reader’s tastes with numerous illustrations on each page. The story begins around Christmas time, in the mid 1800’s, and is about five sisters who are living in near poverty, but whom are filled each with their own talent and charisma. The story goes through each of their lives' journeys of gains and losses, with both sad and happy times, as well as broken and everlasting romances, and portrays the undying love and bonds that the sisters hold for one another, from childhood, on through to adulthood Suggestions for Classroom Use: This is a great book to use to teach children/young adults about aspects of past events in our country through the form of a novel. This book could be used for a literature circle, more geared toward female interests. ESOL Applications/Modifications: The new contemporary printing of this book is excellent for ESOL students because there are numerous illustrations included on each page to guide the reader visually through the story.
  31. 31. Award Books
  32. 32. Book Title: Make Way for Ducklings Author: Robert McCloskey Illustrator: Robert McCloskey Genre: Award Book Award/Year: Caldecott, 1942 Primary Summary of Book: Mr. and Mrs. Mallard (ducks) are searching for a place to make their own, and lay their eggs to have babies, but they are having trouble doing that in such a busy city. They finally find a place, and make friends with a policeman named Michael who feeds them peanuts. Mrs. Mallard faces crossing a dangerous intersection with her ducklings and is lead back safely to a public garden where Mr. and Mrs. Mallard decide to stay for good. Suggestions for classroom use: This book is a good one to use to evaluate student comprehension. The teacher could do a read aloud, and probe students with questions to infer on what they think will happen next. Students could then complete a sequencing worksheet where they will cut out scenes from the book and paste them in the right order in pairs or small groups. ESOL Applications/Modifications: ESOL students may have trouble comprehending this book, because the sketches are in black and white, and the texts are larger in length and smaller in print size. For all assignments concerning this book, ESOL students should be assigned to a partner for help, guidance, and reference, and during the read aloud be pulled closest to the teacher to be able to see the book close up.
  33. 33. Book Title: Olivia Author: Ian Falconer Illustrator: Ian Falconer Genre: Award Book Award/Year: Caldecott, 2001 Primary Summary of Book: This book has an adorably sarcastic feel to it. Character, Olivia is very imaginative and particular about events that take place in her life. She gets into a little trouble because of this, and argues with her mother, but at the end of the night, they both tell one another that they love each other while her mother reads her a story in bed. Suggestions for classroom use: This story would be one that is good to put imaginative thinkers into the spotlight. Before reading the book aloud to students, tell them that you are going to pretend to read a book. Open that book in your lap and openly show students the “thinking out loud” technique while reading an imaginary book. Read the book aloud to the students and then let them “think out loud” at certain points in the book by asking, “Is she allowed to do this?” or “What do you think Olivia is thinking right now?” ESOL Applications/Modifications: Thinking out loud will help ESOL students understand points at which they should be doing the same. Also, letting students pretend at the beginning will give students a more concrete realistic feel of an abstract form of thing thinking such as by “imagination”.
  34. 34. Book Title: Because of Winn Dixie Author: Kate DiCamillo Illustrator: None Genre: Award Book Award/Year: Newbery Award; Intermediate Summary of Book: This book is about a young girl named Opal who’s mother left her as a child, and is now living with her father, a preacher. She finds and befriends a stray dog and names him Winn Dixie (After the grocery store). Winn Dixie helps Opal meet lots of new people, and learn some of life’s most important lessons, as well as deal with internal emotions that she is faced with along the way. In the end, Opal is no longer a lonely girl, and has gained many new friends, all because of her dog, Winn Dixie. Suggestions for Classroom Use: Have students first read the book, and then view the movie made that is based on the story, and create a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast similarities and differences in the movie from the book. Do a “Sketch to Stretch” activity, where the teacher reads chapter five and the students sketch what they visualize while the chapter is being read and then write about it. ESOL Applications/Modifications: ESOL students could be allowed to preview parts of the movie before reading the book to help them better visualize the characters, settings, and plot of the story.
  35. 35. Book Title: Number the Stars Author: Lois Lowry Illustrator: None Genre: Award Book Award/Year: Newbery Award; 1990 Primary+ Summary of Book: The book takes place during the holocaust, where a ten year old named Annemarie puts her life on the line to help shelter a Jewish friend from the hands of the German Nazis. Annemarie and her family try to disguise her best friend, Ellen, as a child of their own, Annemarie’s “sister”, but Nazi soldiers become suspicious when they notice that she is the only one with dark hair and features in their family. In the end, Annemarie wears Ellen’s star of David necklace as a symbol of their friendship until her friend Ellen returns and can take it back for herself. Suggestions for Classroom Use: Students can become familiar with Denmark in the beginning chapters by the teacher printing out a map, and asking the students to find and color select locations with colored pencils. Have students make their own “Recipe for Peace” by asking children to brainstorm and write about what they think it takes to make peace. ESOL Applications/Modifications: Have ESOL students work with a partner while color coding their map, then provide ESOL student with an already finished map to check their work.
  36. 36. Book Title: Bud, Not Buddy Author: Christopher Paul Curtis Illustrator: None Genre: Award Book Award/Year: Coretta Scott King and Newbery Award; 2000 Primary+ Summary of Book: Bud is a ten year old boy, motherless, living in Michigan during the great depression. He decides that he is going to try to find his father. The man he finds does not believe that Bud is his son, and actually turns out to be his grandfather. In the end, they are left with one another, and trying to find a way to begin a relationship. Suggestions for Classroom Use: Make a story map to analyze the setting, characters, conflict, and resolution of the story. Have the class hold a mock press conference for Bud, not Buddy. ESOL Applications/Modifications: Students acting out in a dramatic way will help the ESOL student’s understanding of the arguments they are making about the story. Students playing separate roles should wear name tags to help the ESOL student know who is who.
  37. 37. Book Title: New Moon Author: Stephanie Meyer Illustrator: None Genre: Award Book Award/Year: Young Reader’s Choice Award Intermediate+ Summary of Book: Edward, Bella’s “vegetarian” vampire boyfriend decides that he must leave her in order to ensure her safety from himself, and his still blood thirsty, newly turned “vegetarian” family member, Jasper. As the months pass by, Bella is miserable, but only one person/werewolf can bring any bit of life back into her, Jacob Black. Miscommunication leads Edward to later Believe that Bella has killed herself. Edward makes plans in Italy to end his own life, after word of this news, and Bella rushes to get on a plane to meet him there and let him know she is still alive before it is too late. Suggestions for Classroom Use: This book, along with all the others in the Twilight Saga can be used as inspiration to teach areas of Native American Culture, Mythology, and even Geography. ESOL Applications/Modifications: A major motion picture is in the making regarding this movie. It would be a good idea for ESOL students to see either clips of the movie before the reading of the book, or most or the entire movie for visualizing purposes while reading.
  38. 38. Poetry
  39. 39. Title: What I Like Author: Dean Koontz Poetic Element: Onomatopoeia Illustrator: Phil Parks I like the way snakes wiggle I like the way girls giggle I like the way rockets zoom I like the way fireworks boom I like the way monkeys swing I like the way church bells ring I like the way bluebirds sing I like almost everything I don’t like folks who are glum Being glum strikes me as dumb I like folks who like life, too. If you like life, I like you.
  40. 40. Title: Listen to the Wind Author: Dean Koontz Poetic Element: Personification Illustrated By: Phil Parks Listen to the wind! Hear it spin, spin, spin! Telling where it’s been: Rome and Back again. Listen to it howl! Hear it growl, growl, growl! Wind is on the prowl And it wants in now! Listen to it sigh! Hear it cry, cry cry! Such a sorry sigh. Don’t you wonder why? Listen to it moan! Hear it groan, groan, groan! Such a gnawing tone, Hungry for a bone Listen to it climb Through the bright wind chimes, Keeping time, time, time: Music so sublime.
  41. 41. Title: Reflection Author: Jane Yolen Poetic Element: Metaphore Photographs By: Jason Semple Water is a magic mirror Showing earth and sky, Revealing the fairest To the careful eye What’s up is down, What’s far is near; A truth is so fragile Only eyes can hear.
  42. 42. Title: Embroidery Author: Jane Yolen Poetic Element: Metaphore Photographs By: Jason Semple On this green loom, In this wet place, The ocean makes Fine water lace Each patterned wave Lays down a thread Upon the ground Of ocean bed. Enduring It shall never be, This water lace Embroidery
  43. 43. Title: What did? Author: Shel Silverstein Illustrator: Shel Silverstein Poetic Element: Pun What did the carrot say to the wheat? “ ‘ Lettuce’ rest, I’m feeling ‘beet.’ ” What did the paper say to the pen? “ I feel quite all ‘write’ my friend.” What did the teapot say to the chalk? Nothing, you silly… teapots can’t talk!
  44. 44. Title: The Little Boy and the Old Man Author: Shel Silverstein Poetic Element: Rhyme Illustrator: Shel Silverstein Said the little boy, “Sometimes I drop my spoon.” Said the little old man, “I do that too.” The little boy whispered, “I wet my pants.” “ I do that too,” laughed the little old man. Said the little boy, “I often cry.” The old man nodded, “So do I.” “ But worst of all,” said the boy, “it seems Grown-ups don’t pay attention to me” And he felt the warmth of a wrinkled old hand. “ I know what you mean,” said the little old man.
  45. 45. Title: How Now, Brown Cow? Author: Alice Schertle Poetic Element: Rhyme Illustrator: Amanda Schaffer How Now, Brown Cow? How’s it going? Just stopped by- Heard you lowing…. Lovely view. Lovely weather. Good to have This moo Together.
  46. 46. Title: Consider Cow Author: Alice Schertle Poetic Element: Pun Illustrator: Amanda Schaffer Consider cow Which rhymes With bough But not With rough. That’s clear Enough. Remember moo Will rhyme With through But not With trough Or thought Or tough You’ve got It now: There’s dough And bough And cough And through And mough… Er, moo.
  47. 47. Title: Old, Cold Pizza Author: Loris Lesynski Poetic Element: Personification Illustrator: Loris Lesynski Old, cold pizza. Having breakfast all alone. Everybody’s gone to work. There’s only me at home. Wish someone else was here. Pizza could you say: “ Morning kid – I hope you have a really awesome day
  48. 48. Title: A Patch of Old Snow Author: Robert Frost Poetic Element: Image Illustrator: Henri Sorensen There’s a patch of old snow in a corner That I should have guessed Was blown –away paper the rain Had brought it to rest. It is speckled with grime as if Small print overspread it, The news of a day I’ve forgotten- If I ever read it.
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