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Heuristic Evaluation
Heuristic Evaluation
Heuristic Evaluation
Heuristic Evaluation
Heuristic Evaluation
Heuristic Evaluation
Heuristic Evaluation
Heuristic Evaluation
Heuristic Evaluation
Heuristic Evaluation
Heuristic Evaluation
Heuristic Evaluation
Heuristic Evaluation
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Heuristic Evaluation

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Presented in 4th International Conference On Education And Information Management

Presented in 4th International Conference On Education And Information Management

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • 1. Heuristic Evaluation of Children’s Authoring Tool for Game Making Laili Farhana Md Ibharim¹, Maizatul Hayati Mohamad Yatim² Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris 4th International Conference on Education and Information Management 1
  • 2. Digital Games and Children Game-based learning (GBL) provide the exposure and opportunity to the children to show their talents and abilities in making proposed digital games (Connolly, Stansfield & Boyle, 2009). 2
  • 3. Children in Making Games • Children as ‘producer’ rather than ‘consumer’ (Kafai, 2006). Designer Design Partner • Children involved directly in the research and development process. Informant Tester User Roles for children in designing new technologies - adaptation Druin, 2002. • Enhance the understanding and readiness of children to learn (Baytak, Land & Smith, 2011). • Exchange of knowledge among students and to provide students an enjoyable learning environment (Kamisah & Nurul Aini, 2013) . 3
  • 4. Authoring Tool for Children • AT for kids = Allows children to develop or design a digital game according to the principles and guidelines in the theory of constructivism (Maizatul Hayati, 2009). • Good selection of authoring tools: • Save time • Easier for children to create something unique and meaningful. Scratch Gamefroot Gamestar Mechanic 4
  • 5. Heuristic Evaluation for Children Product • Usability: Effectiveness, efficiency & satisfaction. • Heuristic inspection: Evaluate usability problems of a product based on predefined sets (Nielsen & Molich, 1990) Consistency Familiar way to program Familiar conceptual model Childfriendliness Usability Heuristic Inspection Reflection Degree of functionality Staying in the flow Usability heuristic inspection for authoring tool for children (Maizatul Hayati, 2009) 5
  • 6. Evaluation Session • Participant • 9 students of Diploma Game Design and Development, UPSI (semester 4). • 4 lecturers of Department of Computing, UPSI. • Instrument • Observation guided by a set of Heuristic inspection checklist • Procedure • Phase 1: Students evaluation • Phase 2: Students and lecturer evaluation 6
  • 7. Findings 7
  • 8. Result 1: User Acceptance • Interface design should be aesthetic, easy to understand, easy to follow and simple. • Familiar with the concept of the environment authoring tool with real world. Game Salad • Open source, portable, and has a high level of engagement and fun. Scratch 8
  • 9. Result 2: Interaction Between User and Authoring Tool • Child – centered design (CCD): every navigation and features in authoring tools have to function properly. • Simple icons that can be seen and understood by children. • Allow children to operate freely and no confusing instructions. • Provision of interactive galleries . Gamefroot 9
  • 10. Result 3: Creativity and Skill of Children • May assist children in designing something new, unique and particularly useful digital games in educational value. • Children become skillful in terms of technical skill and softskill. Atmosphir • Improve their self-esteem and motivation. Stencylworks 10
  • 11. Conclusion • A good selection of authoring tools is the backbone that contributes to the success of a multimedia product. • Children need to be exposed to the experience of developing their own digital games to prove the creativity and skills to be a glorious cyber generation for a better nation. 11
  • 12. References • • • • • • • Baytak, A., Land, S.M., & Smith, B.K. (2011). Children as Educational Computer Game Designers: An Exploratory Study. TOJET, 10(4). Connolly, T., Stansfield, M., & Boyle, L. (2009). Games-based learning advancements for multisensory human computer interfaces: Techniques and effective practices. Information Science Reference. Dix, A. (Ed.). (2004). Human computer interaction. Pearson Education. Druin, A. (2002). The role of children in the design of new technology. Behaviour and information technology, 21(1), 1-25. Kamisah, O., & Nurul Aini, B. (2013). Teachers and Students as Game Designers: Designing Games for Classroom Integration. In S. de Freitas, M. Ott, M. Popescu, & I. Stanescu (Eds.), New Pedagogical Approaches in Game Enhanced Learning: Curriculum Integration (pp. 102-113). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-3950-8.ch006. Maizatul Hayati, M.Y. (2009). Children, Computer and Creativity: Usability Guidelines for Designing Game Authoring Tool for Children. PhD Dissertation, Otto-Von-Guericke University of Magdeburg, Germany. Nielsen, J. (2013). Nielsen Norman Group: Evidence-Based User Experience Research, Training, and Consulting. http://www.nngroup.com. 12
  • 13. THANK YOU Q & A SESSION 13

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