College Campus Advocacy through Classroom Learning Projects
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College Campus Advocacy through Classroom Learning Projects

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National Conference on Tobacco or Health, 2002

National Conference on Tobacco or Health, 2002

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College Campus Advocacy through Classroom Learning Projects College Campus Advocacy through Classroom Learning Projects Presentation Transcript

  • College Campus Advocacy Through Classroom Learning Projects Kathleen McAuliffe, MD, MPH Kylie Meiner, MPH Yvonne Michael, ScD, MPH
  • Current Smoking Prevalence: High School Seniors, College Students and Adults 1991-1999 Sources: Monitoring the Future 2000; CDC NYRBS and NHIS, 2000
  • Tobacco Use Among Oregon College Students
    • PSU Student Cigarette Smoking in the Past Year: 37.3%
    • Harvard College Alcohol Study (2002)
    • Tobacco Use Among 18-24 Year Old Students in Oregon
      • 17% of 18 –24 year old students smoke
      • 8% use smokeless tobacco
      • 3% smoke cigars
    • Source: Preliminary data from Oregon BRFSS 1998 – 2001, n=456
  • Community-Campus Partnership
    • Community-based learning project
    • Shared goal: Work with students to improve campus tobacco policy
    • Partners:
      • Student Health Service
      • School of Community Health Cancer Prevention Class
      • County Health Department
  • Service Learning
    • “ Learning starts with a problem and continues with the application of increasingly complex ideas and increasingly sophisticated skills to increasingly complicated problems." 
    • (Thomas Ehrlich, in: Barbara Jacoby and Associations.  Service-Learning in Higher Education: Concepts and Practices.  San Francisco, CA : Jossey-Bass, 1996) 
  • Service Learning Cont’d
    • Service-learning includes the various pedagogies that link community service and academic study so that each strengthens the other (Community Campus Partnerships for Health)
      • Community-identified concerns
      • Grounded in community context
      • Reflection connects service, academic coursework, and citizenship
  • Key Components of Service Learning
      • Goal of service to empower students and those being served
      • Balance of service and learning objectives
      • Education through examination and reflection on community needs and experience
      • Builds on or applies class content
      • Learning is reciprocal
  • Tobacco Policy Projects
    • Presented background on college tobacco issues, media literacy, & public health policy approaches
    • Class brainstormed issues & prioritized preferences
      • Smoke-free University Housing
      • Creating Designated Outdoor Smoking/ Nonsmoking Areas
      • Updating Current Smoking Policy
      • Tobacco Product Sales on Campus
      • Smoke-free Bars
  • Project Outline
    • Adapted College Youth Advocacy Network College Advocacy Guide and Praxis Project materials
    • Students:
      • Surveyed campus environment (smoking, signage)
      • Interviewed students
      • Interviewed campus decision makers
      • Interviewed bar owners
      • Developed policy recommendations, action plan, & communication plan
  • Final Project Components
    • Findings
      • Survey results
      • Map of signage & ash cans
    • Recommendations:
      • Provide more smokefree housing
      • Meet benchmarks for comprehensive campus policy
    • Specific steps to change policies:
      • Surveys
      • Committee processes
    • Targets of advocacy, community partners:
      • List of decision-makers, allies, potential adversaries
    • Communication strategy to build support for change &/ or publicize new policy:
      • Media messages, Information outlets
  • Advantages of Service Learning Approach
    • Grades provide motivation
    • Campus-based
    • Immediate feedback (facilities updated smoking policy on campus website)
    • Gave meaning and relevance to course objectives
  • Advantages cont’d
    • Community partners were able to use student research & suggestions to request campus policy changes
    • Good mechanism for bringing together various interests inside and outside campus system
  • Challenges
    • Institutional obstacles
      • Internal Review Board process
      • Students had difficulty meeting with administrators, getting consistent story
    • Short time-frame (10 week term)
    • Varied quality of work
      • Student time commitments
      • Procrastination
      • 2 groups imploded
    • Lack of advocacy skills or policy orientation
    • Sustainability after course ends: no mechanism for students to stay involved
  • Outcomes
    • Visibility of tobacco issues in campus press
    • Drug & Alcohol Policy Committee
      • Motivated committee to expand smoke-free zone from 10 to 20 feet
      • Committee requested permanent status
    • College Housing Northwest
      • Resident surveys
      • Motivated to consider expanding smoke-free housing
      • Regulation enforcement
  • Impact on Students
    • “ What seems like an easy task of information gathering can easily be a bureaucratic nightmare. It takes a certain amount of tenacity and conviction in the need for a specific policy to overcome such obstacles.”
    • “ I learned how much the media can play a role, and how I as a person can affect the environment around me.”
    • “ I could see that with all of our work there was actually potential for change.”
  • Conclusion
    • “ Before this project I looked at implementing policies as a huge project, something that isn’t really done by just students.
    • By doing this project however, I learned that it really is just a step by step process and that this is something that we really could succeed in doing. That is a very empowering realization.”