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Objectives to
be presented:
4.C&G.1.1 Summarize the key principles and revisions of the North Carolina Constitution.
4.C&G...
Poetry Lesson
10
Use all you
know about
poetry to
understand the
author’s
message.
(Mood, Tone,
Personification)
“Moon”
Po...
MOON
Moon remembers.
Marooned in shadowed night,
white powder plastered
on her pockmarked face,
scarred with craters,
fill...
“Moon”
By Myra Cohn
Livingston
Meaning I Infer What Makes Me
Think That
Mood or Tone
Sad, Lonely, Somber,
Mysterious…
―Rem...
11:15-12:15
12:15-1:00
Inquiry
The lesson will begin by introducing the new inquiry board. Give students pictures
of a var...
Objectives to
be presented:
4.C&G.1.1 Summarize the key principles and revisions of the North Carolina Constitution.
4.C&G...
10:30-
11:15
Math
Investigat
ions
Homework
p35
Session 2.5 Assessment: 34 X 68 Ten-Minute Math – Counting Around the Class...
Objectives to
be presented:
4.C&G.1.1 Summarize the key principles and revisions of the North Carolina Constitution.
4.C&G...
11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess
12:15-1:00
Inquiry
Continue Tuesday‘s lesson.
1:00-1:45
Writers‘
Workshop
6 Focus: Studying the a...
Objectives to
be presented:
4.C&G.1.1 Summarize the key principles and revisions of the North Carolina Constitution.
4.C&G...
Poetry Lesson 13
Ask yourself,
“Why did the
author do that?”
(Personification)
“Moon”
Poetry Lesson 13 - Ask yourself, “Wh...
11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess
12:15-1:00
Inquiry
The lesson will begin with a review of the class map of animal habitats. The
t...
Objectives to
be presented:
4.C&G.1.1 Summarize the key principles and revisions of the North Carolina Constitution.
4.C&G...
Poetry Lesson
10
Use all you
know about
poetry to
understand the
author’s
message.
(Mood, Tone,
Personification)
“My Shado...
11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess
12:15-1:00
Inquiry
Day 2: The lesson will begin with a review of the class map of animal habitats...
Objectives to
be presented:
4.L.1.1 Give examples of changes in an organisms environment that are beneficial to it and som...
11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess
12:15-1:00
Inquiry
Day 3: The lesson will begin with a review of the class map of animal habitats...
Objectives to
be presented:
4.L.1.1 Give examples of changes in an organisms environment that are beneficial to it and som...
10:30-11:15
Math
Investigations
Homework
C63
3.5A Common Core Lesson
Dividing 4-Digit Numbers
Ten Minute Math – Closest es...
Objectives to
be presented:
4.L.1.1 Give examples of changes in an organisms environment that are beneficial to it and som...
11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess
12:15-1:00
Inquiry
The lesson will begin ordering some new pictures (April will sent) into a food...
Objectives to
be presented:
4.L.1.1 Give examples of changes in an organisms environment that are beneficial to it and som...
11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess
12:15-1:00
Inquiry
The lesson will begin with a review by discussing with students the idea of ho...
Objectives to
be presented:
4.L.1.1 Give examples of changes in an organisms environment that are beneficial to it and som...
U8-5
Teaching Point- Focus Strategy:
Students locate multiple pieces of information from different sentences and use the ―...
11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess
12:15-1:00
Inquiry
The lesson will begin with a review by reading some of the answers that studen...
Objectives to
be presented:
4.L.1.1 Give examples of changes in an organisms environment that are beneficial to it and som...
U8-6
Teaching Point- Focus Strategy:
Students locate multiple pieces of information from different sentences and combine t...
11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess
12:15-1:00
Inquiry
The lesson will begin with a review of the class chart of how animals use thei...
Objectives to
be presented:
4.L.1.1 Give examples of changes in an organisms environment that are beneficial to it and som...
U8-7
Teaching Point- Focus Strategy:
Students reflect on information to answer ―on your own‖ questions, enabling them to t...
10:30-11:15
Math
Investigations
Homework
p24
Session 2.3 Round 20 Ten-Minute Math Quick Survey HW p. 24
Students and teach...
Fourth adaptations
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  1. 1. Objectives to be presented: 4.C&G.1.1 Summarize the key principles and revisions of the North Carolina Constitution. 4.C&G.1.2 Compare the roles and responsibilities of state elected leaders. 4.C&G.1.3 Explain the influence of the colonial history of North Carolina on the governing documents of our state. 4.C&G.1.4 Compare North Carolina‘s government with local governments. 4.C&G.2.1 Analyze the preamble and articles of the North Carolina Constitution in terms of rights and responsibilities. 4.C&G.2.2 Give examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens according to North Carolina Constitution. 4.C&G.2.3 Differentiate between rights and responsibilities reflected in the North Carolina Constitution. RL.4.2 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text. RL4.5 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems when writing or speaking about a text. 4.OA.2 Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison 4.OA.4 Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. 4.NBT.5 Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one digit whole number, and multiply two two-digits numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Essential Questions What is an adaptation? What are some animal adaptations? What threats do animals face in their environments? 7:45-8:00 Unpacking, Checking AR Logs, Morning News, Morning Meeting 8:00-8:50 Specials 8:50-9:50 Reading Workshop Poetry Lesson 10 – See next slide. 9:50-11:05 Math Investigations Homework p33 Session 2.4 Practicing Multiplication 10 Minute Math- Counting around the Class The teacher will model solving 39 X 75 (p79). The teacher will start with asking the students how they would start to solve the problem using 40 x 75 as an option for solving from the day before. The teacher will record students‘ suggestions of strategies. Students will discuss how they should finish the problem? How can we change one factor to create an easier problem? Math Workshop: •More multiplication Cluster Problems (finish 23-26) •Writing Multiplication Story Problems •Factor Bingo •Solving pg. 29 Discussion: What kinds of story problems did you write to help you represent your multiplication problems? How does this strategy help you understand the problem you are trying to solve? Ask students whether their solution is clear enough for someone else to understand, whether they can combine any of the steps? Have you double checked your work to make sure that all the computation is correct? 11:05-11:20 Word Study/Read Aloud The teacher will continue to read the book Riding Freedom. The teacher/students will talk about interpreting the text. Lesson Plans for Fourth Grade – Date – Monday, April 29, 2013 Enduring Understanding: What‘s the Big Idea here? Animals adapt to their environments in order to survive. In varying environments, some kinds of plants and animals survive well, less well, and some don‘t survive at all.
  2. 2. Poetry Lesson 10 Use all you know about poetry to understand the author’s message. (Mood, Tone, Personification) “Moon” Poetry Lesson 10 – Use all you know about poetry to understand the author’s message. (Mood, Tone, Personification) Connection: The teacher will begin the lesson by telling the students they will be reading and responding to a poem called ―moon‖ which was written by Myra Cohn Livingston. Tell them this poem is a nonfiction poem. It made me think of all the things I know about the moon, or have felt while looking up at it on a cold, dark night. It‘s so far away and at the same time, so familiar to us, up there in the sky, night after night. Tell students to turn and talk about some things they know about the moon, or some thoughts you have had while gazing at it. (turn and talk and share out.) Remind students that poetry requires us to infer meaning from the poem‘s language. Remind students their background knowledge and experiences will help them infer to understand the poem. As we read the poem, we‘ll think about the poet‘s choice of words and phrases and make inferences to understand her ideas about the moon. Ask students to name some of the things poets use to create a mood and to help us understand what they want us to know. (Line breaks, rhythm & rhyme, alliteration, personification, imagery, figurative language, similes and metaphors.) Tell students that often when we read, we are pretty sure we know what the words mean, but poets usually play with words, so we have to always be thinking and visualizing as we read. ―With this poem, we‘ll want to stop and infer, making sure we understand the poem‘s language. To do that, we‘ll read more slowly rather than whizzing right through the poem. We‘ll stop and discuss words, phrases, or lines from the poem, to merge the information and ideas in the poem with our thinking. As we interpret the poet‘s words, we‘ll surface the bigger ideas. ― Teach: The teacher will read the poem aloud. She will invite students to chime in. ―Now, we‘ll reread the poem slowly, a few lines at a time. You‘ll see me stop to think carefully about certain words and phrases. Tell students you will write your inferences right next to the words or line you‘re trying to understand. The teacher will read ―Moon remembers‖ hmmm. When I read those words, I immediately asked myself a question. I wondered, Remembers what? What does the moon remember? Since I don‘t know the answer to that question, I‘ll write it down. I‘m noticing that the poet has used personification, so she must want me to get to know the moon. I‘m going to get my mind ready to learn about how the moon acts and maybe how it feels.‖ Active Engagement: The teacher will continue to read the next line, ―Marooned in shadowed night, ― The teacher will quickly explain the meaning of marooned. (stranded , stuck or unable to go anywhere– We were marooned at the restaurant for an hour when the rain poured down so hard, we couldn‘t leave.) The teacher will continue reading and ask students to consider the tone or mood of the poem and to think about how the moon may be feeling, since we know the poet wants us to think of the moon as a person who may think and have feelings. Ask a few students to share their discussions about the mood of the poem and the feelings of the moon and TO TELL WHAT MAKES THEM THINK THAT. The teacher may record in a chart ―Meaning I Infer/What Makes Me Think That.‖ Link: When we read poetry slowly, we can notice the meaning in each word or image a poet sends our way.
  3. 3. MOON Moon remembers. Marooned in shadowed night, white powder plastered on her pockmarked face, scarred with craters, filled with waterless seas, she thinks back to the Eagle, to the flight of men from Earth, of rocks sent back in space, and one faint footprint in the Sea of Tranquility. Lesson 12: Moon (1 of 1) From SPACE SONGS by Myra Cohn Livingston. Copyright © 1988 Myra Cohn Livingston. Used by permission of Marian Reiner. © 2005 by Stephanie Harvey and Anne Goudvis from The Comprehension Toolkit (Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann). This page may be reproduced for classroom use only.
  4. 4. “Moon” By Myra Cohn Livingston Meaning I Infer What Makes Me Think That Mood or Tone Sad, Lonely, Somber, Mysterious… ―Remembers‖ ―Marooned‖ ―Shadowed night‖ ―thinks back‖ Personification The moon feels sad or lonely. She‘s marooned and she seems to just have her memories. Line breaks/placement: Shaped like a moon. Picture the moon alone in the sky – understand she‘s lonely – only one moon The breaks in the lines slow the poem down and make it sound sad or lonely. Rhythm & Rhyme: None Alliteration: faint footprint The footprint is almost gone – like everything else and moon‘s alone. It‘s the only alliteration in the poem, so the poet must want us to pay attention to it. Metaphor: surface of the moon is compared to ―waterless seas‖ and ―pockmarked face.‖ Helps us understand the moon as lonely, without things and scarred. Because the poet could have described the moons surface in more positive ways, but chose these ways to show loneliness and scars from the past. Simile: none Putting together the Big idea: The moon is lonely. She‘s all by herself in the sky. She misses the men who visited when the astronauts walked there.
  5. 5. 11:15-12:15 12:15-1:00 Inquiry The lesson will begin by introducing the new inquiry board. Give students pictures of a variety of animals in their habitat. Have the students to a blind sort of the pictures. Ask groups how they sorted their animals out? Was it by characteristics, habitat, size? Have groups notice that animals can be categorized in many different ways. Ask students to sort their animals by the habitats that the animal lives in. The teacher will do a group sort on the board with the animals- keep this up on your inquiry board. Add a map to your inquiry board, where you can locate certain habitats like ocean, desert, rainforest, grasslands, arctic. The teacher will model formulating a quality questions she has about animals in a similar environment based on the observations he has made. ―I noticed that all the animals that live in the ocean have a rubbery looking skin. I wonder why they don‘t have fur?‖ Have the students turn and talk and write some of their observations and questions down on post-it notes. (add to your inquiry board) Tell students that throughout the unit, your going to think about and learn how animals are able to survive in their environment. Then, the teacher will tell the students that today they are going to further study some of the environments that animals live in. They will complete an activity called ―what would animals encounter in…‖ The teacher will model with the desert. She will read information about the desert, and stop and jot about what the environment is like their, she will also model continuing to ask good questions about the environment and the animals that are present in that environment. Than each group will be given a habitat (either arctic, grassland, rainforest, ocean, desert, forest) and they will read the information as a group (From Tanya), and jot down on the recording sheet (Kylene will make) about what that environment is like. The students will share out their information with the class, and post their information learning sheet onto the inquiry board. 1:00-1:45 Writers‘ Workshop 4 Focus: Adapted from Lucy Session 2: Listening for Line Breaks Connection: Remind students about how we have been analyzing poetry through the eyes of a writer, refer back to the anchor char you have been keeping about what you have noticed about how poets use words. Teach: Tell students that poets do things on purpose! Show the students the Moon Poem (from toolkit) The author was very particular about where they stopped each line so that the poem looked like a moon. Show them of the other Space poem that is from toolkit and how the author divided up the words on the page in a certain way so that the readers will read the poem in a certain way. Show students the Goldfish Poem (SMARTBoard) Read aloud both poems with the students the way that they are written. Have the students turn and talk about what they noticed about the difference in the way that the two poems sounded to the readers. The teacher will go back to the poem that they wrote the day before and model how she wants to use line breaks so that her poem is read a particular way. Active Engagement: The students will then have a chance to practice this strategy as well. Have students read their poems to their partners again, and notice how the sound of the poem has changed because of the way the lines break. This changes the way that the poem is read. Sometimes Poets needs to change their line breaks many times in order to have the poem sound just the way that they want it to. Mini-Workshop Point: The teacher will model doing this until she likes the way her poem sounds. The teacher will also point out how doing this also makes the poem sound musical (relate that idea to the rap music or musical artists that they know about). Link: remember as a poet you need to pay attention to the line breaks, because it will determine how your readers read your poem. 1:45-2:15 Math Differentiation 2:15-2:45 AR/Conferring
  6. 6. Objectives to be presented: 4.C&G.1.1 Summarize the key principles and revisions of the North Carolina Constitution. 4.C&G.1.2 Compare the roles and responsibilities of state elected leaders. 4.C&G.1.3 Explain the influence of the colonial history of North Carolina on the governing documents of our state. 4.C&G.1.4 Compare North Carolina‘s government with local governments. 4.C&G.2.1 Analyze the preamble and articles of the North Carolina Constitution in terms of rights and responsibilities. 4.C&G.2.2 Give examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens according to North Carolina Constitution. 4.C&G.2.3 Differentiate between rights and responsibilities reflected in the North Carolina Constitution. RL.4.2 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text. RL4.5 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems when writing or speaking about a text. 4.OA.2 Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison 4.OA.4 Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. 4.NBT.5 Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one digit whole number, and multiply two two-digits numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Essential Questions What is an adaptation? What are some animal adaptations? What threats do animals face in their environments? 7:45-8:00 Unpacking, Checking AR Logs, Morning News, Morning Meeting 8:00-9:30 Double Specials 9:30-10:30 Reading Workshop Poetry Lesson 11 – Ask yourself, “Why did the author do that?” (Line Breaks/Shape) Connection: Remind students of how they have been reading slowly, out loud, and carefully to understand the language in the poems. Tell students that we do this because poets use fewer words to tell the reader what they want them to know. For this reason, the words are packed with meaning and we have to pay extra-close attention to try and understand what the poet is saying – or what the poet wants us to feel and know. (infer) Thinking about why poets do certain things can help us understand poetry better. Teach: Show an enlarged version of Moon. Model thinking aloud about the way the print of the poem is placed on the page. (In the shape of a moon. It‘s written in lines – some short, some longer. The thoughts are not always written in complete sentences...) Record your ideas on the chart. Model asking yourself, ―Why did the author write the lines this way?‖ Think aloud about how the short lines slow the poem down and add to the sad or lonely mood of the poem. Model wondering why the poet put the lines in the shape of the moon. Model inferring that maybe because we know there is only one moon in the sky at night, we will feel how lonely the moon is – in the sky all by herself. Tell students that sometimes poems are special in other ways – Sometimes they rhyme. Sometimes they are longer and are grouped in groups of lines called stanzas. Because poems don‘t have to follow all the rules of regular text, the poet can get pretty fancy with how he does things to make you feel and think what he wants. That‘s another reason that we have to read poetry more slowly and carefully, always thinking: ―Why did the author say that?‖ ―What is the author trying to get me to think or feel?‖ Active Engagement: Reread the poem and ask students to notice any lines that are especially long or short and to ask themselves ―Why.‖ Students should notice that faint and footprint are all alone on the line by themselves. If students don‘t come up with the idea that these could be important words to the poem, discuss to help them think of that. Link: When we read poems slowly to try and understand, it helps to ask ourselves, ―Why did the poet do that?‖ Lesson Plans for Fourth Grade – Date – Tuesday, April 30, 2013 Enduring Understanding: Animals adapt to their environments in order to survive. In varying environments, some kinds of plants and animals survive well, less well, and some don‘t survive at all.
  7. 7. 10:30- 11:15 Math Investigat ions Homework p35 Session 2.5 Assessment: 34 X 68 Ten-Minute Math – Counting Around the Class HW p. 35 The lesson will begin with an assessment. The students will work to complete the problem on M19. The teacher will remind students that they have been working hard on multiplication problems for some time and that she wants to see what strategies they use when they solve multiplication problems on their own. She will remind students to show their solution clearly so that she can understand their thinking just by looking at the paper. Workshop • More Multiplication Cluster Problems • Writing Multiplication Story Problems • Factor Bingo • Small group for students who are struggling. Discussion: The teacher and students will discuss the strategies they used for solving the multiplication problem. (Break apart, landmark numbers, arrays, cluster problems, prayer…) 11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess 12:15-1:00 Inquiry The lesson will begin by reviewing the habitat sort from yesterday, and the information that the students collected on the habitats. The students will tell the students that scientists research information to find the answers to their many questions so they will be completing lots of research throughout this unit. She will tell them they will be collecting information/data through their research. They will be recording their data as scientists do and they will learn more about adaptations through their research. The teacher will show students a picture of the camel (from D11 book, All About Animals pp12 & 13) and ask students how to talk with their partners about how this animal survives in its environment. The teacher and students will discuss what an adaptation is. An adaptation is a way an animal’s body helps it survive, or live, in its environment. She will also tell the students that animals depend on their physical features to help them obtain food, keep safe, build homes, withstand weather, and attract mates. The teacher will also tell the students that adaptations develop over many generations. The lesson will continue by having the students see if they can identify animals with adaptations that help them survive. In groups, students will brainstorm a variety of animals by filling in information from the Adaptations recording chart The teacher will model with the students how to read the camel information and then record the information on her sheet. Students will practice with the camel and help the teacher. 1:00-1:45 Writers‘ Workshop 5 Session 5: Focus: Some poets use rhyme in their poems. Connection: Remind students that with the line breaks that they have been working on we created rhythm in our poems. Teach: Today we are going to work on examining and practicing creating poems with rhyme. Ask students to turn and talk about what rhyme is. As we have learned before, though not all poems rhyme, some do and they rhyme in certain patterns. The teacher will give students a couple of minutes to examine various poems with rhyming. Have students notice the pattern. Come back together and discuss what you found. Then tell the students you would like to model this, and your subject that you are choosing to write about is a dog (you can use a picture of Dixie if you want from the SMARTBoard lesson) Start with ―I have a dog...‖ Model how to think about words that rhyme with ―dog‖- Hog, Bog, Smog, and Fog. Then say ―I have a dog, she likes the fog‖ and look around for students‘ input....then say ―oh wait! That makes no sense! Even though it rhymes, it is important that my poem is still meaningful and makes am writing about just so my poem rhymes. Model thinking about the dog again and thinking aloud to figure out what you really want to say. ―Soft black fur, ears that flop, of the best dogs ever, Dixie is at the Top‖ Remind to students that when they are working on their poems today and using rhyming that they want to be sure that their poems still make sense. Active Engagement: Students will then practice using the craft of rhyming to create poems in their journals. They will choose the best one to add to their poetry book. Link: Remember that you do not want to lose sight of what your poem is really about when you a creating a rhyming poem. 1:45-2:15 Math Differentiation (May need to finish Investigations) 2:15-2:45 AR/Conferring
  8. 8. Objectives to be presented: 4.C&G.1.1 Summarize the key principles and revisions of the North Carolina Constitution. 4.C&G.1.2 Compare the roles and responsibilities of state elected leaders. 4.C&G.1.3 Explain the influence of the colonial history of North Carolina on the governing documents of our state. 4.C&G.1.4 Compare North Carolina‘s government with local governments. 4.C&G.2.1 Analyze the preamble and articles of the North Carolina Constitution in terms of rights and responsibilities. 4.C&G.2.2 Give examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens according to North Carolina Constitution. 4.C&G.2.3 Differentiate between rights and responsibilities reflected in the North Carolina Constitution. RL.4.2 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text. RL4.5 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems when writing or speaking about a text. 4.OA.2 Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison 4.OA.4 Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. 4.NBT.5 Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one digit whole number, and multiply two two-digits numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Essential Questions What is an adaptation? What are some animal adaptations? What threats do animals face in their environments? 7:45-8:00 Unpacking, Checking AR Logs, Morning News, Morning Meeting 8:00-8:50 Specials 8:50-9:50 Reading Workshop Poetry Lesson 12 Ask yourself, “Why did the author do that?” (Personification) Connection: Remind students of the first line of Moon and think aloud ―Moon remembers. That sounds like the moon is a person who can think and remember. ― Remind students of how the author set us up to think of the moon as human with thoughts and feelings, so we got our minds ready to think about the moon that way. Remind them that it helps us understand the poem better to ask, ―I wonder why the author of this poem wanted to make the moon seem human‖ Teach: The teacher will tell students that she is connecting to the thinking she already did about the shape of the poem and how there being only one moon in the sky sort of helps us feel that the moon is lonely. So if the poet wants us to think of the moon as lonely, it would help to make the moon seem human. Active Engagement: Tell students that we are going to keep reading with this question in mind. ―Why did the poet make the moon seem human?‖ Tell students to let you know if they hear other places where the author makes the moon seem human –uses personification. Allow students to share as you read when they notice personification. When someone notices the ―pockmarked face‖ say, ―that really makes me visualize the moon with a face like a human. But ‗pockmarks‘ are scars like you get from the chicken pocks or from getting a cut on your skin. Maybe the poet wants us to know that the moon has scars, or hurts from things that have happened in the past. That would go along with ‗remembering‘ too! I wonder what happened in the past?‖ Ask students to keep listening as you read for times when the moon sounds human. When someone notices ―she thinks back‖ ask students to turn and talk about how ―thinking back‖ connects to another part of the poem. (Moon remembers). Link: When we want to understand better, we ask, ‖Why did the author do that?‖ 9:50-11:05 Math Investigations Homework p Session 3.1 – How Many Groups Can You Make? Ten-Minute Math – Closest Estimate HW p. 40 The lesson will begin by writing a story problem from SAB p37 on the board. Students will work in pairs to solve the problem. The teacher will encourage students to use drawings or other representations to show the teams of 14. The teacher will listen in to pairs to ask, ―How can you begin to organize these students into teams‖? And ‖Do you think there will be more or fewer than 10 teams? Why?‖ The class will discuss how they figured out the number of teams and how they drew/represented their teams. Discussion: The teacher will ask volunteers to give the first step of how they solved problem 2 on page 37. The teacher will collect several examples that used multiples of 10 to discuss because this is an important landmark that students should consider. She will ask how many teams of 7 can be made from 112 students. The teacher and students will discuss several examples collected. The teacher will ask for other ways that students solved this problem that weren‘t shared. 11:05-11:20 Word Study/Read Aloud The teacher will continue to read the book Riding Freedom. The teacher/students will talk about interpreting the text. Lesson Plans for Fourth Grade – Date Wednesday, May 1, 2013 Enduring Understanding: What‘s the Big Idea here? Animals adapt to their environments in order to survive. In varying environments, some kinds of plants and animals survive well, less well, and some don‘t survive at all.
  9. 9. 11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess 12:15-1:00 Inquiry Continue Tuesday‘s lesson. 1:00-1:45 Writers‘ Workshop 6 Focus: Studying the authors craft to help us create our own poems. - Onomatopoeia Connection: The teacher will remind students of the things that we have been looking at thus far in our poetry unit. And have several students share out their great work! Teach: Tell students that over the next couple of days we are going to continue to look at author‘s crafts and see how they use onomatopoeia, repetitions, alliteration, metaphor, simile, and personification as elements in their poetry. The teacher will explain that today we are going to discuss onomatopoeia. Remind students of when we used this as a strategy to begin our personal narratives earlier this year. The teacher will show students an example of the poem ―onomatopoeia‖ and explain how this craft helps give the reader a humorous and visual image. The teacher will then model using this author‘s craft to help her create her own poem (she will model looking through her journal at her generated ideas to help her decide what she can write about, or relate it to an object in the room) Active Engagement: Have the students turn and talk about what you did, and how you used the authors craft. Students will then work on their own poem using onomatopoeia, and then they can add this poem to their poetry booklet. Link: Remember that this is one powerful device that poets often use. 1:45-2:15 Math Differentiation 2:15-2:45 AR/Conferring
  10. 10. Objectives to be presented: 4.C&G.1.1 Summarize the key principles and revisions of the North Carolina Constitution. 4.C&G.1.2 Compare the roles and responsibilities of state elected leaders. 4.C&G.1.3 Explain the influence of the colonial history of North Carolina on the governing documents of our state. 4.C&G.1.4 Compare North Carolina‘s government with local governments. 4.C&G.2.1 Analyze the preamble and articles of the North Carolina Constitution in terms of rights and responsibilities. 4.C&G.2.2 Give examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens according to North Carolina Constitution. 4.C&G.2.3 Differentiate between rights and responsibilities reflected in the North Carolina Constitution. RL.4.2 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text. RL4.5 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems when writing or speaking about a text. 4.OA.2 Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison 4.OA.4 Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. 4.NBT.5 Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one digit whole number, and multiply two two-digits numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Essential Questions What is an adaptation? What are some animal adaptations? What threats do animals face in their environments? 7:45-8:00 Unpacking, Checking AR Logs, Morning News, Morning Meeting 8:00-8:20 AR/Conferring 8:20-8:50 Global Studies 8:50-9:50 Reading Workshop See Poetry Lesson 13 – Next slide. 9:50-11:05 Math Investigations Homework p 48 Session 3.2 Solving Division Problems Ten-Minute Math – Closest Estimate HW p. 48 The lesson will begin by reminding students of the multiple tower activity they worked on in the previous unit. She will draw students‘ attention to p41. The teacher will ask students to discuss the questions with each other for a few minutes. Next, the class will solve the problem together by sharing some of the student strategies. The teacher will ask how they figured out how many numbers Marvin had in the tower and if he had 240 at the top, what helped you think about this? Workshop Using Multiples of Ten • Problems About Multiple Towers • Solving Division Problems • Factor Bingo Discussion: The teacher and students will discuss the different ways they solved the problems. How did they break the dividend part of the problem? How did they use multiples of 10 to solve. 11:05-11:20 Word Study/Read Aloud The teacher will continue to read the book Riding Freedom. The teacher/students will talk about interpreting the text. Lesson Plans for Fourth Grade – Date – Thursday, May 2, 2013 Enduring Understanding: What‘s the Big Idea here? Animals adapt to their environments in order to survive. In varying environments, some kinds of plants and animals survive well, less well, and some don‘t survive at all.
  11. 11. Poetry Lesson 13 Ask yourself, “Why did the author do that?” (Personification) “Moon” Poetry Lesson 13 - Ask yourself, “Why did the author do that?” (Personification) Connection: The teacher will remind students of how they have been reading and rereading ―Moon‖ slowly and carefully to understand the language. She will remind them of how it helps to ask, ―Why did the poet do this?‖ so that we can start to put the meaning together. She will tell students that she thinks many of them are starting to have the ―mystery‖ of this poem all figured out. She will remind them of how they found connections between the meaning they found in the personification and in the shape of the poem. She will tell them that this ―putting things together is what helps us really understand the meaning of a poem. Teach: The teacher will suggest to the students that we read the poem one more time, carefully and pay attention to any parts that we haven‘t really thought carefully about yet since we know that authors of poems choose words carefully. They don‘t use many, so each word has big meaning. Teach: The teacher will read the poem again, going back to the second half to reread it from, ― to the Eagle…‖ She will tell students that she remembers when the United States sent men to the moon. She remembers watching the moon landing on TV and hearing them say ―The Eagle has landed!‖ (Most of you will have to say your grandmother told you.) and that she knows the astronauts took moon rocks back to earth from the moon‘s surface. (She may show students the video of the moon landing at http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=6DA4F2E9-F560- 4196-8F5C-1D80DAC848D0&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US The teacher will reread the last half of the poem, thinking aloud about the sea of tranquility being the part of the moon where the astronauts landed (and how the ―sea‖ was dry). The teacher will tell students that when this poet talked about the ―Eagle‖ and the ―Sea of Tranqulitiy ― that she was alluding to the moon landing. (Allusions are when authors mention something else that people she‘s sure people will know about – usually something famous or well known.) The teacher will wonder how all this information goes together with what we have already worked to understand about the poem. She will remind herself that the poet wanted us to think of the moon as a person and as having feelings of loneliness and hurt from things that have happened in the past, Point out the places in the poem that gave you the clues to these inferences – Why you think that. She will tell students that she has a theory of how these pieces of information could fit together with the moon landing. Active Engagement: The teacher will ask students to turn and talk about their theories of how all the information fits together: What does the lonely moon and its past have to do with the astronauts walk on the moon? (Go Back to the two short lines ―faint‖ and ―footprint.‖ Students will quick write to tell their theory and the teacher will ask a few of the students to share their theories. The teacher may record in the chart. Link: When we read the poem over and over again, we try to fit the pieces together to get the big idea of the poem.
  12. 12. 11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess 12:15-1:00 Inquiry The lesson will begin with a review of the class map of animal habitats. The teacher and students will discuss the ways that animals change to adjust to their habitats. They will discuss what types of adaptations different animals would need to adapt in their habitats. The teacher and students will read the ―Letter from Nora‖ to learn about the job of a conservationist. Students will view some pictures (from Kylene) of animals in distress in their environments. Students will study the pictures to discuss how certain habitats and conditions are more helpful to animals than others. They will discuss what they notice affects a habitat in a positive or negative way. As students share, the teacher will record in a ―Positive and Negative Effects‖ chart. Next, students will receive the newspaper from Conservationist, Nora. The teacher will model by reading the flamingo article with the students. As they browse the text, the teacher will model using subheadings and features of print to help her think about what she will be learning. He teacher will think aloud as she reads the Flamingo article to discuss with students how the flamingo is affected in his environment and possible solutions to the flamingo‘s problems. ―Why is this an important issue to deal with now instead of later?‖ The teacher and students will examine some of the domain specific vocabulary and how they can figure out the meanings when they don‘t know. (Proper names, decline, purposes…) The teacher will also model thinking aloud about the parts of the map and how the keys and other map features can help her learn. The teacher will show students her chart of problems and solutions in habitats to model how she would complete the chart for flamingos. Students will continue to read Nora‘s newspaper and completing the chart. Each day, students will share their information and the teacher will continue recording in a class chart. (Students will try to complete the chart for two animals per day.) Some students may work with the teacher in a small group to read and record in the chart. 1:00-1:45 Writers‘ Workshop DIGGING DEEPER 1:45-2:15 Math Differentiation 2:15-2:45 AR/Conferring
  13. 13. Objectives to be presented: 4.C&G.1.1 Summarize the key principles and revisions of the North Carolina Constitution. 4.C&G.1.2 Compare the roles and responsibilities of state elected leaders. 4.C&G.1.3 Explain the influence of the colonial history of North Carolina on the governing documents of our state. 4.C&G.1.4 Compare North Carolina‘s government with local governments. 4.C&G.2.1 Analyze the preamble and articles of the North Carolina Constitution in terms of rights and responsibilities. 4.C&G.2.2 Give examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens according to North Carolina Constitution. 4.C&G.2.3 Differentiate between rights and responsibilities reflected in the North Carolina Constitution. RL.4.2 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text. RL4.5 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems when writing or speaking about a text. 4.OA.2 Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison 4.OA.4 Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. 4.NBT.5 Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one digit whole number, and multiply two two-digits numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Essential Questions What is an adaptation? What are some animal adaptations? What threats do animals face in their environments? 7:45-8:00 Unpacking, Checking AR Logs, Morning News, Morning Meeting 8:00-8:50 Specials 8:50-9:50 Reading Workshop See next slide. 9:50-11:05 Math Investigations Session 3.3 Solving Division Problems, (continued) Ten- Minute Math – Closest Estimate The lesson will begin with Workshop. The teacher will remind students of some of the discussions they had at the end of yesterday‘s lesson. Workshop Using Multiples of Ten • Problems About Multiple Towers • Solving Division Problems • Factor Bingo Discussion: The teacher and students will discuss the different ways they solved the problems. How did they break the dividend part of the problem? How did they use multiples of 10 to solve. 11:05-11:20 Word Study/Read Aloud The teacher will continue to read the book Riding Freedom. The teacher/students will talk about interpreting the text. Lesson Plans for Fourth Grade – Date – Friday, May 3, 2013 Enduring Understanding: What‘s the Big Idea here? Animals adapt to their environments in order to survive. In varying environments, some kinds of plants and animals survive well, less well, and some don‘t survive at all.
  14. 14. Poetry Lesson 10 Use all you know about poetry to understand the author’s message. (Mood, Tone, Personification) “My Shadow” Poetry Lesson 10 – Use all you know about poetry to understand the author’s message. (Mood, Tone, Personification) Connection: The teacher will begin the lesson by telling the students they will be reading and responding to a poem called ―My Shadow‖ which was written by Robert Louis Stevenson. Tell students to turn and talk about some things they know about shadows and what the title makes them think about. (turn and talk and share out.) Remind students that poetry requires us to infer meaning from the poem‘s language. Remind students their background knowledge and experiences will help them infer to understand the poem. The teacher will model thinking aloud to remind herself of all the things we need to remember to notice and think about when we read poetry. As we read the poem, we‘ll think about the poet‘s choice of words and phrases and make inferences to understand his ideas about shadows. Ask students to name some of the things poets use to create a mood and to help us understand what they want us to know. (Line breaks, rhythm & rhyme, alliteration, personification, imagery, figurative language, similes and metaphors.) Tell students that often when we read, we are pretty sure we know what the words mean, but poets usually play with words, so we have to always be thinking and visualizing as we read. ―With this poem, we‘ll want to stop and infer, making sure we understand the poem‘s language. To do that, we‘ll read more slowly rather than whizzing right through the poem. We‘ll stop and discuss words, phrases, or lines from the poem, to merge the information and ideas in the poem with our thinking. As we interpret the poet‘s words, we‘ll surface the bigger ideas. ― Teach: The teacher will read the first stanza of the poem aloud. She will invite students to chime in. ―Now, we‘ll reread the poem slowly, a few lines at a time. You‘ll see me stop to think carefully about certain words and phrases. Tell students you will write your inferences right next to the words or line you‘re trying to understand. The teacher will model noticing the rhythm and rhyme in the poem and telling how it makes her feel. Active Engagement: The teacher will continue to read the next two stanzas (or the rest of the poem). The teacher will stop to think aloud about and explain some of the obscure vocabulary. Students will turn and talk to discuss how the poem makes them feel. Ask a few students to share their discussions about the mood and tone of the poem and the feelings it invokes in them. Make sure TO TELL WHAT MAKES THEM THINK THAT. The teacher may record in a chart ―Meaning I Infer/What Makes Me Think That.‖ Link: When we read poetry slowly, we can notice the meaning in each word or image a poet sends our way.
  15. 15. 11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess 12:15-1:00 Inquiry Day 2: The lesson will begin with a review of the class map of animal habitats. The teacher and students will discuss the ways that animals change to adjust to their habitats. They will discuss what solutions students have come up with so far and whether they are reasonable. As students share, the teacher will record in a ―Positive and Negative Effects‖ chart. The teacher and students will examine some of the domain specific vocabulary that students encountered the day before and how they can figure out the meanings when they don‘t know. (Proper names…) Students will discuss how they may have used the class map help them understand the habitats and figure out solutions. Students will continue to read Nora‘s newspaper and completing the chart. Each day, students will share their information and the teacher will continue recording in a class chart. (Students will try to complete the chart for two animals per day.) Some students may work with the teacher in a small group to read and record in the chart. 1:00-1:45 Writers‘ Workshop DIGGING DEEPER 1:45-2:15 Math Differentiation 2:15-2:45 AR/Conferring
  16. 16. Objectives to be presented: 4.L.1.1 Give examples of changes in an organisms environment that are beneficial to it and some that are harmful 4.L.1.2 Explain how animals meet their needs by using behaviors in response to information received from the environment 4.L.1.3 Explain how humans can adapt their behavior to live in changing habitats 4.L.1.4 Explain how differences of the same population sometimes give individuals an advantage in surviving and reproducing and changing habitats .RL4.5 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems when writing or speaking about a text. 4.OA.2 Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison 4.OA.4 Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. 4.NBT.5 Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one digit whole number, and multiply two two-digits numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Essential Questions What is an adaptation? What are some animal adaptations? What threats do animals face in their environments? 7:45-8:00 Unpacking, Checking AR Logs, Morning News, Morning Meeting 8:00-8:50 Specials 8:50-9:50 Reading Workshop U8-1 Teaching Point- Focus Strategy: Students read text features to gather information to increase text understanding. Use ANIMAL ADAPTATIONS BY Kate Boehm Jerome (conceptLinks) FROM THE INQUIRY TUB. Connection: Remind students they learned earlier in the year that good readers often look at text features, such as pictures with captions, maps, or graphs, and use them to help understand nonfiction text ideas. But, let them know that now, we learn how to actually ―read‖ text and visual features to learn all the information we can from graphics. Explain that ―reading‖ text features is one way to help understand articles. Teach: Display the feature article and distribute student copies. Ask students to name the article‘s features, which will probably be familiar to them as they have practiced since early in the year. Highlight these features on the article. Call their attention to any they miss. Tell students you will now ―read‖ the text features, which may confuse them, as many students may assume that naming the feature is the same as ―reading‖ it. Model looking at and ―reading‖ several text features by thinking aloud what you know or can infer from each text feature. Record some on sticky notes and place them near the appropriate text features. Active Involvement: After modeling several, ask students to work with their partners and finish ―reading” by placing sticky notes near, or writing directly in the margins the article‘s remaining text features. Students share out after working together about five minutes. Point out to students all the gathered information. Ask them how they think it will help when we read the text of the article. The point of today‘s lesson is to note information gathered from text features, not to read the article. Link: Tell students to select short articles that interest them from three or four you copied and continue to ―read‖ text features, recording information on sticky notes and placing them near the features or writing notes in the margins. Remind them they will not actually read the articles right now, just text features. After ―reading‖ their text features, have students read from book bags/boxes. It is okay if some students become engrossed in their articles and read them. Share: Partners share information recorded on their sticky notes. Have two or three students share out with the whole group. Ask students again how they think reading text features might help when they read articles. Materials: Variety of highly interesting or engaging feature articles, persuasive writing, and editorials collected before launch of unit, from various sources, such as www.timeforkids.com, http://teacher.scholastic.com/scholasticnews/, www.ajkids.com/news.asp, www.pbs.org/newshour/extra 9:50-11:05 Math Investigations Homework p50 Session 3.4 Sharing Division Strategies Ten-Minute Math Counting Around the Class HW p. 50 The lesson will begin with a discussion. The teacher will choose a problem from p45 and ask students to share strategies they used to solve the problem. The teacher will ask students whether they have a story context in mind to help them think about the division problem. The teacher will record students‘ strategies on chart paper as they are shared. The teacher will ask questions that focus on what students knew about he number in the problem that helped them get started. Workshop Using Multiples of 10 Lesson Plans for Fourth Grade – Date – Monday, May 6, 2013 Enduring Understanding: What‘s the Big Idea here? Animals adapt to their environments in order to survive. In varying environments, some kinds of plants and animals survive well, less well, and some don‘t survive at all.
  17. 17. 11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess 12:15-1:00 Inquiry Day 3: The lesson will begin with a review of the class map of animal habitats. The teacher and students will discuss the ways that animals change to adjust to their habitats. They will discuss what solutions students have come up with so far and whether they are reasonable. As students share, the teacher will record in a ―Positive and Negative Effects‖ chart. The teacher and students will examine some of the domain specific vocabulary that students encountered the day before and how they can figure out the meanings when they don‘t know. (Proper names…) Students will discuss how they may have used the class map help them understand the habitats and figure out solutions. Students will continue to read Nora‘s newspaper and completing the chart. Each day, students will share their information and the teacher will continue recording in a class chart. (Students will try to complete the chart for two animals per day.) Some students may work with the teacher in a small group to read and record in the chart. 1:00-1:45 Writers‘ Workshop Focus: Studying the authors craft to help us create our own poems. - Alliteration Connection: The teacher will remind students of the things that we have been looking at thus far in our poetry unit. Review and define the poetic devises that have been discussed. Teach: Tell students that over the next couple of days we are going to continue to look at authors crafts and see how they use particular devices in their poetry. The teacher and students will review what was learned about how onomatopoeia is used in poetry. The teacher will explain that today we are going to discuss alliteration. Show students the alliteration example ―Peter Piper‖ and have the students turn and talk about how they would define alliteration. Tell students that today we are going to apply this craft to our own poems. The teacher will model creating an alliteration poem .(Animals are always a good topic for this). Active Engagement: Then students will work on creating their own alliteration poem and apply their favorite one to their poetry book. Students will share their alliteration poems with a peer. Students will share out on how their partners used alliteration. * Bring in how alliteration effects the mood and tone, rhythm and rhyme. Link: From this moment on, remember how good poets utilize alliteration in their poetry as a particular craft. 1:45-2:15 Math Differentiation 2:15-2:45 AR/Conferring
  18. 18. Objectives to be presented: 4.L.1.1 Give examples of changes in an organisms environment that are beneficial to it and some that are harmful 4.L.1.2 Explain how animals meet their needs by using behaviors in response to information received from the environment 4.L.1.3 Explain how humans can adapt their behavior to live in changing habitats 4.L.1.4 Explain how differences of the same population sometimes give individuals an advantage in surviving and reproducing and changing habitats .RL4.5 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems when writing or speaking about a text. 4.OA.2 Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison 4.OA.4 Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. 4.NBT.5 Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one digit whole number, and multiply two two-digits numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Essential Questions What are the basic needs for survival? What is a food chain and how does it work? How are food chains and food webs different? What do all food chains start with? 7:45-8:00 Unpacking, Checking AR Logs, Morning News, Morning Meeting 8:00-9:30 Double Specials 9:30-10:30 Reading Workshop U8-2 Teaching Point- Focus Strategy: Students read text features to gather information to increase text understanding. Use ANIMAL ADAPTATIONS BY Kate Boehm Jerome (conceptLinks) FROM THE INQUIRY TUB. Connection: Remind students good readers ―read‖ and make logical inferences from text features to learn all the information they can from graphics. Tell students we will continue developing our skill ―reading‖ text features, but we will also use the information from them to help read and understand an article. Teach: Display a copy of a new feature article and distribute student copies. Ask students to name the article‘s features and read their meanings. Record some on class article or chart with sticky notes and place them near the appropriate text features Active Involvement: After doing several together, ask students to work with their partners and finish ―reading‖ by placing sticky notes near the article‘s remaining text features. Students share out after working together about five minutes. Point out to students all the gathered information. Tell students you will read the article aloud and think about how reading text features helped you understand the article‘s contents. After reading the article, ask students what new information they now have. Ask students how reading text features first helped them read and understand the article. Link: Tell students to select articles that interest them from three or four you copied and ―read‖ text features, recording information on sticky notes and placing them next to the features. Tell students to read their articles and think about any new information they have. Share: Partners share information recorded on their sticky notes. Ask students to discuss how reading text features helped when they actually read their articles‘ text. Have two or three students share out with the whole group. Materials: Variety of highly interesting or engaging feature articles, persuasive writing, and editorials collected before launch of unit, from various sources, such as www.timeforkids.com, http://teacher.scholastic.com/scholasticnews/, www.ajkids.com/news.asp, www.pbs.org/newshour/extra Older articles that deal with issues from current events magazines. Maybe from Flocablulary. Lesson Plans for Fourth Grade – Date – Tuesday, May 7, 2013 Enduring Understanding: What‘s the Big Idea here? Animals adapt to their environments in order to survive. Plant and animal populations depend on each other for survival. (food chains, relationships)
  19. 19. 10:30-11:15 Math Investigations Homework C63 3.5A Common Core Lesson Dividing 4-Digit Numbers Ten Minute Math – Closest estimate with 4 digit numbers Discussion: The teacher/students will talk about the different strategies they have practiced when dividing 4 digit numbers. The teacher will show them a story problem on page C61. The teacher will ask students to solve the problem. (have on the board) Ask student questions as they discuss the problem. Ask: ―Do you think there will be more or fewer than 10, 100, 1,000 bags and why.‖ Ask ―How can multiplication help you solve this problem?‖ Record their strategies on the board that they used to solve the problem. Look for a variety of ways. Students will solve problems on page C61-62. Students work on the problems. Then Discuss how they were able to solve the problems on the two pages. Check for their understanding. (One will have a remainder so talk a bit about this.) Focus on this a bit and what they were able to do with the problem. Ask if they‘re harder than the ones they had previously solved. Hopefully they will know that they are just longer not harder than the others. EOG Review: Balanced equations/input and output (Algebra and order of operations) 11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess 12:15-1:00 Inquiry The lesson will begin with a review by reading the class chart of problems and solutions for animals in different habitats. The teacher will wonder aloud, ―What happens if one type of animal goes away? Or what if some plants disappear?‖ The teacher and students will discuss articles they have read about different animals and how habitats were affected by loss of food sources. Students will use parts of a food chain to put the parts of the chain in order. After ordering, students will share their chains and discuss why they ordered the way they did. The teacher will ask students to discuss what a producer and consumer, would be based on what they already know about these words in different contexts. Students and teacher will read ppA47-A49 in the science book to learn about producers and consumers in a food chain. Students may reorder their chains, discussing why and how they reordered. Students will discuss which animals would be the producers and which would be the consumers. They will also try to label/name the other parts of the chain. 1:00-1:45 Writers‘ Workshop Focus: Studying the authors craft to help us create our own poems. -Metaphors Connection: The teacher will remind students of the things that we have been looking at thus far in our poetry unit. Tell students that over the next couple of days we are going to continue to look at authors crafts and see how they use repetitions, alliteration, metaphor, simile, and personification as elements in their poetry. Remind students about some of the devices we have already talked about, and have one of two students share their simile poems. Teach: The teacher will tell students that today we are going to take a deeper look at metaphors, and how poets use this device to create imagery in their poems. Remember when we read some poems that included metaphors, we noticed that the author was comparing two things using the word ―is.‖ The teacher will share the poem ―blue‖ again to students and discuss the images she sees due to the authors words. The teacher will then show students another poem from Hailstones and Halibut Bones to see how the poet uses metaphors to paint pictures in our mind, point out how the words are very precise to create those images. Have students turn and talk about what they hear, and think, when they read the poem. The teacher will then model using metaphors to create her own poem- ( I would suggest using a color.) Active Engagement: The students will turn and talk about what they noticed you did as a writer when you wrote your poem, what did you think about? How did you use metaphors to create pictures in your text? The students will then work on their own poems using the metaphors in their poems. Link: Remember how writers use metaphors to compare two things saying that they are the same, this creates powerful images in the readers mind. 1:45-2:15 Math Differentiation (May need to finish Investigations) 2:15-2:45 AR/Conferring
  20. 20. Objectives to be presented: 4.L.1.1 Give examples of changes in an organisms environment that are beneficial to it and some that are harmful 4.L.1.2 Explain how animals meet their needs by using behaviors in response to information received from the environment 4.L.1.3 Explain how humans can adapt their behavior to live in changing habitats 4.L.1.4 Explain how differences of the same population sometimes give individuals an advantage in surviving and reproducing and changing habitats .RL4.5 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems when writing or speaking about a text. 4.OA.2 Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison 4.OA.4 Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. 4.NBT.5 Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one digit whole number, and multiply two two-digits numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Essential Questions What are the basic needs for survival? What is a food chain and how does it work? How are food chains and food webs different? What do all food chains start with? 7:45-8:00 Unpacking, Checking AR Logs, Morning News, Morning Meeting 8:00-8:50 Specials 8:50-9:50 Reading Workshop U8-3Teaching Point- Focus Strategy: Students use their skill of ―reading‖ text features to infer author‘s purpose and main idea of an article, justifying their ideas with text evidence. Connection: Hand out student copies and display a feature article rich with text features. Tell students to think about all the facts they can see or infer from the article‘s text features. Explain that text features help us think about the big idea the author is trying to communicate. You do not need to elaborate on what big idea means at this point; understanding emerges and grows during this lesson. Teach: Tell students to spend a few minutes just reading text features and noting what they see or can infer on their copies. Have students share out and record their observations on a chart. Now, ask students to review all their observations and decide what they think the author wants us to understand. This question is different from asking students what the article is about. Asking them to read and infer from text features what authors want us to understand helps them see articles‘ big pictures. They are learning a strategy for understanding authors‘ issues and perspectives. Active Involvement: As students share out what they think the author wants us to understand, ask them to support their ideas with text evidence. Record their ideas on ―The Big Idea—What Does the Author Want Me to Understand About This Information?‖ chart. Tell students that understanding big ideas of feature articles or editorials takes us beyond what we learned earlier in the year about identifying main ideas and important details. Explain that we have definitely found the main idea, but taken it to a higher level by going beyond identifying the topic; now we are figuring out what the author really wants us to know about the topic, which is the article‘s big idea. Link: Tell students to return to their articles from Lessons 1 or where they used sticky notes to ―read‖ text features. Tell them to review their notes on the articles and answer the question from the class chart, ―What does the author want me to understand about this information?‖ Students write their statements of big ideas in their reading response notebooks, justifying their thinking with text evidence. 9:50-11:05 Math Investigations Homework p 54- 55 Session 3.5 Solving Problems in Context Ten-Minute Math counting Around the Class HW pp. 54-55 The lesson will begin with students solving story problems on pp51 and 52. The teacher will ask students to create an estimate for each problem. The teacher and students will complete the first problem together and then the teacher will model thinking aloud, questioning herself about the problem. (See questions on p107). Students will complete numbers 2-4 independently. Discussion: The teacher and students will discuss by sharing their first steps for 460 divided by 8. The teacher will ask students to suggest ways to finish the problem. (Can they explain using cards and pages?) 11:05-11:20 Word Study/Read Aloud Lesson Plans for Fourth Grade – Date Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Enduring Understanding: What‘s the Big Idea here? Animals adapt to their environments in order to survive. Plant and animal populations depend on each other for survival. (food chains, relationships)
  21. 21. 11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess 12:15-1:00 Inquiry The lesson will begin ordering some new pictures (April will sent) into a food chain and labeling them as ―producers,‖ ―consumers,‖ and ―decomposers.‖ The class will check their work by consulting the chart in the science book on pA46. Next, the teacher will wonder if (one animal) is the only animal that eats ( ). The teacher and students will create a web (―Oh Deer‖) by assigning students certain animals to pass the string to each animal who eats the same food. Students will discuss what they notice about how the organism survives. Can they infer what the difference is in a food chain and a food web. Students and teacher will read the DE passage, ―Food Webs.‖ As they read, the teacher and students will discuss their inferences and their reasons for conclusions they draw. The teacher will remind students that researchers also use videos to gather information. Students will view the DE video, ―What is a Food Chain?‖ Students will turn and talk to discuss answers they have gathered to the Essential Questions. Students will complete a mini assessment after discussing with their peers. (Nicole will send mini assessment.) 1:00-1:45 Writers‘ Workshop Focus: Studying the authors craft to help us create our own poems. – Personification Connection: The teacher will remind students of the things that we have been looking at thus far in our poetry unit. Review and define the poetic devises that have been discussed. Teach: Tell students that today we are going to look at another poetic devise, personification. Have the students turn and talk about what they remember about personification from our reading unit. Show students an example of a poem that has personification that we have already used, like ―August‖ and point out how the author uses personification to make the month act like a person. Tell students some other examples might be: The waves ran towards the shore with furious pace. The leaves danced their way through the lawn. Every morning, the Sun glanced at them with love. Give students some starter topics to think about, and model stopping to jot an example of personification. Active Engagement: The students will join with you and you will give them a topic (dog, December, wind) and have them stop and jot a sentence using personification. Have students turn and share your example. Then students will take a topic from their topics list, and they will work on their own example of a personification poem. Link: From this moment on, remember how good poets utilize personification in their poetry as a particular craft. 1:45-2:15 Math Differentiation 2:15-2:45 AR/Conferring
  22. 22. Objectives to be presented: 4.L.1.1 Give examples of changes in an organisms environment that are beneficial to it and some that are harmful 4.L.1.2 Explain how animals meet their needs by using behaviors in response to information received from the environment 4.L.1.3 Explain how humans can adapt their behavior to live in changing habitats 4.L.1.4 Explain how differences of the same population sometimes give individuals an advantage in surviving and reproducing and changing habitats .RL4.5 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems when writing or speaking about a text. 4.OA.2 Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison 4.OA.4 Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. 4.NBT.5 Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one digit whole number, and multiply two two-digits numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Essential Questions What are the basic needs for survival? What is a food chain and how does it work? How are food chains and food webs different? What do all food chains start with? 7:45-8:00 Unpacking, Checking AR Logs, Morning News, Morning Meeting 8:00-8:20 AR/Conferring 8:20-8:50 Global Studies 8:50-9:50 Reading Workshop U8-4 Teaching Point- Focus Strategy: Students locate specific information using a ―right there‖ strategy to increase their ability to read and process nonfiction texts. Connection: Remind students that in Reading Workshop, they will work to strengthen their nonfiction text reading skills. Ask students to quickly scan the Venn diagram from Lesson 1 to review some differences in reading nonfiction texts. Teach: Illustrate the purpose of reading nonfiction texts—to gather information to solve problems and expand knowledge—versus fiction texts—to entertain. Hold up various nonfiction resources and ask students to share with elbow partners what the purpose of reading that text is. For examples, in a telephone book, to find telephone numbers or addresses; in an atlas, to find locations of countries; in an encyclopedia, to find information about George Washington; and in a nonfiction book, such as Cheyenne, to find out where the Cheyenne lived. Using the phone book, tell students you will search for the telephone number for Joseph Smith. Ask them if this is how to read this nonfiction text: Starting with letter ―A,‖ read each name, address, and telephone number in order as it appears. Hopefully they will stop you immediately to let you know this strategy is not useful for this kind of text, unlike fiction books, which people read from cover to cover. Explain that when reading nonfiction texts, you are often looking for specific information, which is ―right there‖ in the text. It is the easiest kind of information to find and more than likely answers ―who,‖ what,‖ ―when,‖ or ―where‖ questions. As students read nonfiction texts, they should form questions. Remind them of the ―I wonder‖ strategy in Unit 2. Readers often determine what information they will look for as they read. Sometimes teachers or test items determine the questions to answer particular information, but it does not matter. Explain that students should have questions in mind before locating information in nonfiction texts. Begin creating the ―Strategies for Locating Specific Information in Nonfiction Texts‖ chart. Display a copy of the text, then write and read the first ―who,‖ what,‖ ―when,‖ or ―where‖ question you prepared. Skim for and underline two important clue words. For example, in a ―who‖ question, such as ―Who ordered Lewis and Clark to make maps?‖ underline the clue words ―Thomas Jefferson,‖ ―ordered,‖ and ―make maps.‖ Discuss how the answer was ―right there‖ in the words of the text. Once you found clue words, you had the information you were looking for. You did not have to interpret or add to other background information in your head. The information was ―right there‖ in the text. Active Involvement: Students work with partners to examine the photocopied passage and find ―right there‖ information. Tell them to underline clue words in the questions and scan the text for clue words and find ―right there‖ information that answers the questions. Link: Tell students to find ―right there‖ information in their nonfiction reading today. Students read independently from at least one nonfiction source. • Ask them to think of at least two questions with ―right there‖ answers in their chosen texts, then read the texts to locate the ―right there‖ information. • Have students record their experiences with this technique in their reading response journals. 9:50-11:05 Math Investigations Homework Review sheet Ten-Minute Math counting Around the Class Session 3.6 End-of-Unit Assessment Students will complete the End-of-Unit Assessment (M21-M22 30 mins.) The teacher/students will complete EOG review. The lessons will involve base 10 word problems for students to complete. Workshop: •Factor Bingo •Multiple Towers Discussion: The teacher and students will discuss how they are using division to determine solutions to Multiple Tower problems. 11:05-11:20 Lesson Plans for Fourth Grade – Date – Thursday, May 9, 2013 Enduring Understanding: What‘s the Big Idea here? Animals adapt to their environments in order to survive. Plant and animal populations depend on each other for survival. (food chains, relationships)
  23. 23. 11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess 12:15-1:00 Inquiry The lesson will begin with a review by discussing with students the idea of how the shark fits into its food chain. What happens to protect other animals from sharks? Students will discuss to hypothesize about what might happen to keep sharks from depleting the populations of other animals. Students and teacher will view the page about dolphins and sharks (p26) in How Animals Defend Themselves (Inquiry tub). The teacher will wonder aloud, ―Do animals only work together with their own kind?‖ Students will view the first, un-narrated, portion of the video (youtube – animal partnerships – David Attenborough – BBC). The teacher will stop the video and students will discuss the teacher‘s question. Next, the students will finish watching the video to learn how different types of animals cooperate to meet each other‘s needs. Students and teacher will read pp28 and 29 in How Animals Defend Themselves. Students will turn and talk about why the relationships they have learned about would be important for survival. Students will share, then write to answer the question. (Name one relationship of two different types of animals and tell why this relationship would be important for the survival of both.) 1:00-1:45 Writers‘ Workshop DIGGING DEEPER 1:45-2:15 Math Differentiation 2:15-2:45 AR/Conferring
  24. 24. Objectives to be presented: 4.L.1.1 Give examples of changes in an organisms environment that are beneficial to it and some that are harmful 4.L.1.2 Explain how animals meet their needs by using behaviors in response to information received from the environment 4.L.1.3 Explain how humans can adapt their behavior to live in changing habitats 4.L.1.4 Explain how differences of the same population sometimes give individuals an advantage in surviving and reproducing and changing habitats .RL4.5 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems when writing or speaking about a text. 4.OA.2 Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison 4.OA.4 Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. 4.NBT.5 Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one digit whole number, and multiply two two-digits numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Essential Questions How do animals use their senses to help them survive? 7:45-8:00 Unpacking, Checking AR Logs, Morning News, Morning Meeting 8:00-8:50 Specials 8:50-9:50 Reading Workshop See next slide. U8-5 9:50-11:05 Math Investigations Unit 9 and to end of year Session 2.1 The Penny Jar Ten-Minute Math - Closest Estimate The lesson will begin by explaining to students that the Penny Jar begins with a jar containing some pennies and then those get added to again and again. The teacher will show students the Penny jar and begin with 4 pennies in it. She will then add 6 pennies and ask students how many are in the jar now. This procedure will continue with the teacher recording the number of pennies in the jar each time on the board. Pairs of students will use Penny Jar Situation Cards (M19) to find the number of pennies after 6 rounds for each of the two situations. They will record their work on SAB p13. As some students begin to complete p13, the teacher will direct students‘ attention to their results. She will ask them if they can tell from their work how many pennies there are in the jar after each round? The teacher will ask students to find a way to show on a separate sheet of paper the number of pennies in the jar after each round. Students may use a picture, a table, a diagram, numbers, or any other way that shows this clearly. She will tell students that someone looking at their work should be easily able to see how many pennies there are after any round. If they have time, they can show more than 6 rounds. Discussion: The teacher and students will share some of the REPRESENTATIONS that students created for showing the number of pennies. The class will discuss whether they can tell how many pennies are in the jar after (different rounds). What helps us see how many pennies were in the jar after each round? What helps us see how many were added each round? What arithmetic expressions can you use to represent the number of pennies in the jar after round 6? If students need more understanding, start with 7 and ask for an arithmetic expression for each round. 11:05-11:20 Word Study/Read Aloud Lesson Plans for Fourth Grade – Date – Friday, May 10, 2013 Enduring Understanding: What‘s the Big Idea here? Animals adapt to their environments in order to survive. Animals collect information about the environment using their senses.
  25. 25. U8-5 Teaching Point- Focus Strategy: Students locate multiple pieces of information from different sentences and use the ―put-it- together‖ strategy to increase their ability to read and process nonfiction texts. Connection: Remind students they are strengthening their nonfiction text reading skills. Refer students to the ―Strategies for Locating Specific Information in Nonfiction Texts‖ chart. Have them tell their elbow partners what the ―right there‖ strategy is and when to use it. Teach: Let students know ―right there‖ information is the easiest to find, but not always the most useful or interesting. We need to learn to find information buried deeper in texts. After briefly reviewing the ―right there‖ strategy, move students to understanding the ―put-it- together‖ strategy. Explain sometimes information we want is not always ―right there.‖ Often, we have to read more than one sentence to find information we seek. Demonstrate with two ads from the Yellow Pages. Show students they may have to ―put together‖ information from the two ads to answer questions, such as ―How late are restaurants open?‖ Explain that students can recognize questions that require the ―put-it-together‖ strategy by some keys words. These ―think and search‖ questions require that they accurately locate and put together multiple facts to completely answer the questions, which often include words, such as all, sequence, or different types. Tell students that questions containing key words, such as all: ―Who are all the senators from Colorado?‖ and different types: ―What are the different types of fish in the Colorado River?‖ are ―put-it-together‖ questions. So are questions with number words, such as ―What are three animals that live in Colorado?‖ and sequence words, such as ―What are the steps in baking a cake?‖ As you share cue words, ask students to share with their elbow partners other examples of questions that require the ―put-it-together‖ strategy. Display an overhead or digital copy of your social studies text, such as ―Indians of Colorado,‖ and distribute student copies of pre-determined ―think and search‖ questions about the selection that require students to locate at least two different pieces of information from more than one sentence. Ask students to read the first question with you. Point out cue information. For example, asking students to answer the question, ―What are the two major groups of Indians who lived in Colorado in the early 19th century?‖ requires them to get information from the first sentence in the paragraph and near the end of the paragraph. Thus, they have to read and gather information and ―put-it-together‖ to answer the question. Read the first paragraph with students and ask them to discuss with their partners where they see information to put together to answer the question. On the projected copy, underline separate pieces of information that have to be put together to answer the question. Have students help put together the answer to the question. Active Involvement: Students work with partners to examine the photocopied passage and answer two more ―put-it-together‖ questions. Tell students that their jobs are to underline clue words in the questions and scan the text for clue words to put together information to answer the questions. Link: Tell students to find ―put-it-together‖ information in their nonfiction reading today. • Students read independently from at least one nonfiction source. • Ask students to think of at least one question with ―put-it-together‖ answers in their chosen texts and read texts to locate ―put-it-together‖ information. • Have students record their experiences with this technique in their reading response journals. Have a few students share their experiences with “put-it-together” information during independent reading. Write this new nonfiction reading strategy on the “Strategies for Locating Specific Information in Nonfiction Texts” chart.
  26. 26. 11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess 12:15-1:00 Inquiry The lesson will begin with a review by reading some of the answers that students wrote the day before about how relationships between animals help them survive. The teacher will remind students of the reading about the desert tortoise in the research package. Students and teacher will re-read the information and the teacher will wonder aloud, ―How do they know they need to change their sleeping habits?‖ Students will discuss to infer how the tortoise may know that they need to adapt their schedule. The teacher will record ideas as students share. Students will view the video, (Youtube – Sense of Survival). Students will discuss again to decide if the video confirmed any of their inferences. Next, students will read assigned pages in How Animals Use Their Senses (Inquiry Tub). Different groups will read about how eyes, ears, smell, touch and taste assist animals in survival. Each group will discuss and record on a white board how their sense helps animals survive. As they share, the teacher will record in a class chart, listing ways each of the senses helps animals survive. 1:00-1:45 Writers‘ Workshop DIGGING DEEPER 1:45-2:15 Math Differentiation 2:15-2:45 AR/Conferring
  27. 27. Objectives to be presented: 4.L.1.1 Give examples of changes in an organisms environment that are beneficial to it and some that are harmful 4.L.1.2 Explain how animals meet their needs by using behaviors in response to information received from the environment 4.L.1.3 Explain how humans can adapt their behavior to live in changing habitats 4.L.1.4 Explain how differences of the same population sometimes give individuals an advantage in surviving and reproducing and changing habitats .RL4.5 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems when writing or speaking about a text. 4.OA.2 Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison 4.OA.4 Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. 4.NBT.5 Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one digit whole number, and multiply two two-digits numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Essential Questions What are some examples of learned behaviors? What is learned behavior? Do all animals exhibit learned behavior? Why do you think so? 7:45-8:00 Unpacking, Checking AR Logs, Morning News, Morning Meeting 8:00-8:50 Specials 8:50-9:50 Reading Workshop See next slide. 9:50-11:05 Math Investigations Homework p20 Session 2.2 Penny Jar Tables Ten-Minute Math – Closest Estimate The lesson will begin by reviewing the Penny Jar lesson from the previous day. Students will continue working with the Penny Jar situation card to determine the total number of pennies in the jar after a particular round. Students will work on answering questions such as how many pennies will be in the jar in round 10. Can they think of a way to figure this out without taking all the steps. Students will use pp17-18 to determine the number of pennies in the first seven rounds. The teacher will ask students How many 3s they need for the seventh round? Is there a way to think of that using multiplication? She will remind students that they have to check that their pattern works all the way down the table and that it could be more than one operation. Discussion: The teacher and students will focus on describing the relationship between two quantities in a situation of constant change, taking into account a beginning amount and a constant increase AND on finding the value of one quantity in a situation of constant change, given the value of the other. Students will work on M20 and 21 to complete a new Penny Jar situation. Together the teacher will fill in the transparency chart through round 7 taking students input. Record one student‘s idea about how to figure out the number for any round in this Penny Jar. The teacher will ask students to think if there is anything about 90 that would help them decide whether there can ever be that number of pennies in the jar? 11:05-11:20 Word Study/Read Aloud Lesson Plans for Fourth Grade – Date – Monday, May 13, 2013 Enduring Understanding: What‘s the Big Idea here? Animals adapt to their environments in order to survive . Animals exhibit learned behaviors that help them survive.
  28. 28. U8-6 Teaching Point- Focus Strategy: Students locate multiple pieces of information from different sentences and combine that information with their own background knowledge to increase their ability to read and process nonfiction texts. Connection: Remind students they are strengthening their nonfiction text reading skills. Point out the ―Strategies for Locating Specific Information in Nonfiction Texts‖ chart. Have students describe to their elbow partners one strategy for reading nonfiction texts. Teach: Let students know they will expand on the strategies they have already been using . Often, we combine text information with information we already know to answer the most important questions about information we are gathering. Display your text selection and pose your chosen question. Note cue words and point out that this question requires students to ―put-it-together‖ and make inferences from what they already know. Lead students in a shared reading, pointing out cue words while thinking aloud how to put information together and combine it with what you know to answer the question. Active Involvement: Students work with partners to examine the photocopied passage and answer one more ―put-it-together and infer‖ question. Tell students their jobs are to underline the question‘s clue words, scan text for clue words, find information to put together, and talk with partners about what knowledge they need to draw on to answer the question. Link: Tell students to find ―put-it-together and infer‖ information in their nonfiction reading today Students read independently from at least one nonfiction source. • Ask students to think of at least one question with a “put-it-together and infer” answer in their chosen texts and read texts to locate “put-it-together and infer” information. • Students record their experiences with this technique in their reading response journals.
  29. 29. 11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess 12:15-1:00 Inquiry The lesson will begin with a review of the class chart of how animals use their senses to help them survive. The teacher will explain that our senses work without thinking. She will point out the big idea for today and wonder about the meaning of ―behavior.‖ Students will share their ideas of the meaning of the word and tell why they think that. Next, the teacher will have one student come up and drop a ruler between her hands. The teacher will try to slap her hands together to catch the ruler. The student will continue until it becomes clear to the students that she has gotten better at catching the ruler between her hands. The teacher and students will discuss how this learning could relate to the behaviors of animals. Do all animals get better at things through experience or practice? Why would animals need to practice – what are some examples in nature? The teacher and students will discuss/wonder why this ability – to learn a behavior – would be important to survive. Students will view the DE video, ―Learned Response‖ to learn more about animal learning. Students and teacher will read p13 in Animal Adaptations from Inquiry tub. The teacher will notice the text features of the passage to model thinking aloud about the information she can gather even before she reads. Students will read pB71 in the Science book to learn more about learned behaviors. Students will read to answer the question, ―Why is the ability to learn a behavior important to survival?‖ Students will include one example of learned behavior in their response. 1:00-1:45 Writers‘ Workshop Focus: Studying the authors craft to help us create our own poems. - Simile Connection: The teacher will remind students of the things that we have been looking at thus far in our poetry unit. Tell students that over the next couple of days we are going to continue to look at authors crafts and see how they use repetitions, alliteration, metaphor, simile, and personification as elements in their poetry. Teach The teacher will share with students ―Willow and Gingko‖ to point out how the author created images. The teacher will model rereading a poem she has written, thinking aloud about a simile that might make her poem better – show the reader exactly what something or someone is like. Active Engagement: Students and teacher will also read the poem ―similes.‖ The students will turn and talk about the purpose of the similes in the poem. Students will tell how a simile could help their poem show what something is like. Link: Remember how readers use repetition to make a point by repeating particular words and phrases. 1:45-2:15 Math Differentiation 2:15-2:45 AR/Conferring
  30. 30. Objectives to be presented: 4.L.1.1 Give examples of changes in an organisms environment that are beneficial to it and some that are harmful 4.L.1.2 Explain how animals meet their needs by using behaviors in response to information received from the environment 4.L.1.3 Explain how humans can adapt their behavior to live in changing habitats 4.L.1.4 Explain how differences of the same population sometimes give individuals an advantage in surviving and reproducing and changing habitats .RL4.5 Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems when writing or speaking about a text. 4.OA.2 Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison 4.OA.4 Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. 4.NBT.5 Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one digit whole number, and multiply two two-digits numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Essential Questions What is an instinct? What instincts do animals have? How does instinctual behavior help animals survive? 7:45-8:00 Unpacking, Checking AR Logs, Morning News, Morning Meeting 8:00-9:30 Double Specials 9:30-10:30 Reading Workshop See next slide. Lesson Plans for Fourth Grade – Date – Tuesday, May 14, 2013 Enduring Understanding: What‘s the Big Idea here? Animals adapt to their environments in order to survive . Survival advantage is the result of characteristics that the organism already possesses.
  31. 31. U8-7 Teaching Point- Focus Strategy: Students reflect on information to answer ―on your own‖ questions, enabling them to think more deeply about their reading and comprehend nonfiction texts. Connection: Remind students they are strengthening their nonfiction text reading skills. Point out how the ―Strategies for Locating Specific Information in Nonfiction Texts‖ chart helps the process. Have students describe to their elbow partners one strategy for reading nonfiction texts. Teach: Let students know today‘s strategy can be used before or after reading nonfiction texts. Today they work with ―on your own‖ questions, which they answer from inside their own heads. Sometimes people use it both before and after reading. Ask students to think how they feel about going to a school where all the grades were together in one room. After silently reflecting a minute or two, ask them to turn to their elbow partners and share thoughts about this question. You can teach the next part of this lesson on animals in the library and/or technology lab, rather than during Reading Workshop. Plan where it fits best in your schedule. If you teach the lesson in the technology lab or library, have students sit at computers in pairs. Active Involvement: Have pairs of students go to the Doing History site and click any picture on the home page, which takes them to the site‘s table of contents. Ask students to click ―Farmers & Ranchers,‖ then ―Families, Children & Schools,‖ then click ―Schools‖ (or the school photo). Students click the first photo, then ―About this Photo,‖ ―More about this Topic,‖ and ―Their Own Words‖ for each of the seven photos in this section. Have students think silently for a moment about how they would answer the original reflection question now. After personal reflection, ask students to share their thoughts about attending school in a one- room schoolhouse now, in the current year. Has their opinion changed from how they felt before they read this chapter? Link: During Independent and Small Group Time, students continue to explore this Web site or read independently, asking themselves ―on your own‖ questions before they begin reading Students reflect on this activity in their reading response journals. Students think of ―on your own‖ questions before reading independently, based on pictures or titles on the texts‘ first pages. • After reading, students reflect in their reading response journals.
  32. 32. 10:30-11:15 Math Investigations Homework p24 Session 2.3 Round 20 Ten-Minute Math Quick Survey HW p. 24 Students and teacher will work to fill out the table on p62. Students and teacher will record every 5th round. They will explain how they found the number of pennies after round 20. They will also develop arguments and a representation to show why the number of pennies for round 20 is not double the number of pennies for round 10. The teacher will show students the Penny Jar Table with Calculation T96. The teacher and students will work as a class, recording information in the first two rows for this Penny Jar situation. Start with 3 pennies and add 5 pennies each round. They will write the calculation in the middle column. Students may come up with other ways to calculate as they work. Students will work on pp21-22 to record totals for rounds 5, 10, 15, and 20 for the given Penny Jar situation. Discussion of Round 10 and 20: The teacher will ask students to share whom she observed during the previous activity and ask them to share their methods for finding the totals for the rounds. The teacher will write each method on the board as they are shared. The teacher will include others in the discussion by asking, ―Who else used this method?‖ The teacher will discuss with students how doubling can be useful in some situations. She will ask students why it doesn‘t work in this situation. 11:15-12:15 Lunch/Recess 12:15-1:00 Inquiry The lesson will begin by sharing some of the student responses from the day before about learned behavior and how it helps animals survive. The teacher will wonder aloud if all behavior is learned. The teacher will discreetly drop a heavy book on the floor or slam the door. When students startle, the teacher will ask students to discuss whether they made a conscious decision to have that reaction or if it just happened. The teacher and students will discuss other things we do automatically and the possible reasons that our bodies may automatically respond in these ways. (help us survive in some way) The teacher and students will create a class chart of things we do automatically and how they help/protect us. The class will use the list to discuss/wonder about other animals and what instincts they may share with us or other instincts they have. Students will sort some picture cards that represent learned and instinctual behaviors. Students will share their sorts and defend them by giving reasons for their sorts. Next, students and teacher will read p12 in Animal Adaptations from Inquiry Tub to learn about the word, instinct. The teacher will model thinking aloud about the text features and how to figure out the meaning of the word instinct. Students will read pB70 in the science book to learn more about instinctual behavior. They will resort their picture cards after reading if needed. Students will complete a quick assessment from Kylene at the end of the session. 1:00-1:45 Writers‘ Workshop Focus: Creating a higher quality poem by revising poems. Connection: We have talked about all the various devices that good poets use, and we have practiced these devices in our own poems. Teach: Tell students that today you want them to go back to one of their previous poems and raise the quality of that poem. Have students turn and talk about what they remember that we have done in the past when we revise our writing? Point out that when we revise, we are making it BETTER. Revision is a hard process to go through, because you have to step back from your writing, and look at it through the various lenses of a writer, but also think about what it sounds like to a reader. The teacher will remind students that when we revise, we want to make our good work even better, The teacher will model taking one of her previous poems from the unit and reading it to think about the word choices that she uses, does the poem make sense, does it create a picture in the readers mind? Active Engagement: The students will share out on what they think about the revisions that the teacher made to her poem. Turn and talk about the revisions that they can make to their poems. The students will have 30 seconds to find a poem that they feel good about, that they can work on making even better! Have students turn and talk about one idea they have to revise their poem. Have students work on revising their poems. Link: From this moment on, remember how great poets always challenge themselves to make their poems even better! 1:45-2:15 Math Differentiation (May need to finish Investigations) 2:15-2:45 AR/Conferring

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