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-----guess----- Prabbal Frank
The Team Concept• What’s in a name? Not every ‘team’ is really a  team, and some groups that are called by other  names oc...
Benefits of a team• Improved performance  through broader  knowledge and  experience base• Greater creativity, wider  pers...
Benefits of a teamworkFOR EMPLOYEES                         FOR EMPLOYER                                      • Improved p...
• The ability of people to provide complementary  skills, a willingness to share knowledge and skills and  assist other te...
In antiquity, Epicurus stated: "...a captain earns his reputationduring the storms." When your competition scores big agai...
Being a good mother does not call for the same qualities as being agood housewife; a dedication to keeping children clean ...
Accepting change.Change can be in project, duties, power, leader.
• Formation of team happens  & the team comes together• Members feel anxious and  spend their time finding out  about each...
• Team members come up with ideas  through debates on how to  proceed with the task - about task  priorities; clarity on p...
• Work as a team starts• Roles and responsibilities  are clear and accepted• Team begin to exhibit  participative behavior...
• This stage is characterized by high levels  of: goal orientation; interpersonal  relations; independence, motivation,  -...
• Identify team roles• Select right kind of team  members• Make team goals clear• Establish ground rules  including choosi...
Identify team roles• Team leader (shapes)• Team advisor• Facilitator• Process observers or  team members• Scribe or recorder
Select right kind of team members• Contribute a complementary mix of skill sets (project  management skills, financial ski...
Make team goals clear
Establish ground rules• All meetings will start and stop on time;• each meeting will have an agenda;• all team members wil...
Improve communication in the team• Make sure that the roles and responsibilities are clear• Listen to your team• Review th...
•   Focus on collective performance (tips at SRP Inn)•   Build collaboration out of conflict•   Keep the team focused and ...
•   Doer•   Visionary•   Feeler•   Boat Rocker
•   Very task-oriented and action-focused. Give him a job and he’s happy.•   Good at research, reliable, meets deadlines, ...
•   Sees the big picture and likes ideas and concepts. She lets the team’s vision and    mission be the driver. She doesn’...
•   A very strong context person, making sure that everyone is on board    before proceeding with a task or project. He’s ...
• Open and direct with the other members of the team. She regularly  challenges the team on such issues as methods used, g...
• Each of us has a personality preference to how we  approach work, establish relationships with co-  workers, and engage ...
Team building
Team building
Team building
Team building
Team building
Team building
Team building
Team building
Team building
Team building
Team building
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Team building

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  • Clear vs all clear.
  • BACK TO BACK:  Every group member must find a partner of approximately equal height and weight , if possible.  The partners will lock arms with their backs to one another.  With arms remaining locked at all times, the partners will sit down on the ground, kick their legs out straight, and try to stand back up.  Then groups of four will try the same thing.  Then groups of eight, sixteen, and eventually, the entire group together.  This is the perfect activity to begin a trust sequence. TEAM VS. THE WALL:  Divide the group into two teams.  Two members of the team hold the rope at about four to five feet above the ground.  The object of the game is to get everyone over the rope.  No one can go under the rope.  Before you start transferring people over the wall, you meet as a team and decide how to get everyone over.  HINT: If group is small, just have them attempt as one big group.
  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt: 32 nd President of USA (1933-1945)
  • Synergy 2 people working together 3 rd person with habit of smoking The concept of marginal product http://sgspsychology2.webs.com/groupcohesion.htm Social Loafing “ Synergy” is the name given to the constructive power of teamwork, when the group is greater than the sum of its parts. In fact, this doesn’t always occur and quite often groups are less effective than the sum of all the individual effort going on. This was first tested in the early 20th century by Max Ringelmann (1927) , who set up tug-o’-war teams to pull a rope attached to a strain gauge. Ringelmann found that three contestants pulled with only 2½ times the average individual force; eight contestants pulled with less than 4 times the average individual force. Theories of Arousal tell us that people ought to be more effective in groups, especially at simple or well-learned tasks, so what is going on here? One theory is that people actually put in less effort when they realize they are in a group, because they think others will take up the slack. Professor Latané  calls this SOCIAL LOAFING. Another explanation involves CO-ORDINATION ERRORS. The more people involved, the more likely they are to get in each other’s way or pull at different times.
  • 1957 film Naya Daur Singer: Mohd Rafi Actors: Dilip Kumar and Vyjayanthimala
  • Commitment: Dedication:
  • Anna Hazare – 5 values – apman peene ki shakti . International day for tolerance – 16 November International Museum for Tolerance in New York In 1962 he was arrested and convicted of sabotage and other charges, and sentenced to life in prison. Mandela served 27 years in prison, spending many of these years on Robben Island. Following his release from prison on 11 February 1990, Mandela led his party in the negotiations that led to multi-racial democracy in 1994. 
  • example of Dr Midha tender bill told by Dinesh Singh at Mount Abu. National Honesty Day evidently falls on April 30 of every year. According to the folks at Holiday Insights, the day is meant to “encourage us to be honest.” Seems logical enough. What is honesty? Honesty is telling the truth. Honesty is straightforward conduct. Honesty is being sincere, truthful, trustworthy, honorable, fair, genuine, and loyal with integrity.
  • Commitment is most difficult and most readily proven during tough times. How someone weathers the storms most clearly demonstrates their basic beliefs. In antiquity, Epicurus stated: "...a captain earns his reputation during the storms." When your competition scores big against you, when the money dries up, or when the glamour of success wears off, this is when it is easiest to compromise your commitments. The real test comes when you can hold the line against the easy route of compromise. An agreement to perform a particular activity at a certain time in the future under certain circumstances.
  • Samarpit – like a book dedication.   a devoting or setting aside for a particular purpose Self-sacrificing devotion It took a lot of hard work and  dedication , but we managed to finish the project on time. Being a good mother does not call for the same qualities as being a good housewife; a dedication to keeping children clean and tidy may override an interest in their separate development as individuals.  Ann Oakley (British sociologist, 1944)
  • Flexibility: Offering resistance to change. Change can be in project, duties, power, leader
  • Bruce Tuckman: Though he came up with four stages(forming-storming-norming-performing) in his initial publication in 1965, he added ‘Adjourning’(some refers this as ‘Mourning’) , to include team breaks after project completion, in later 1970s. Development level moves from one stage to the other sequentially as they mature as a team but time taken in each stage depends on understanding of and commitment to the goals of the team.
  • Equivalent Situational Leadership style:  Directing
  • Equivalent Situational Leadership style:  Selling
  • Equivalent Situational Leadership style:  Supporting
  • Equivalent Situational Leadership style:  Delegating
  • Team Roles : team leader (shape – dolphins), team advisor, facilitator, process observers or team members, scribe or recorder. Select Members : recruit individuals who can contribute a complementary mix of skill sets (project management skills, financial skills); select individuals with specific problem-solving and decision-making talents; ask for recommendations from your manager and your colleagues; look for individuals who have had team experience; find people who will view this as an opportunity to combine skills and talents with others. The real important thing become attitude. If somebody has the right attitude – they’re enthusiastic, they work ahrd, and they want something to happen as a result of a project as opposed to just wanting the project to end- they can learn most anything they need to know. Ground Rules : all meetings will start and stop on time; each meeting will have an agenda; all team members will attend and participate in team meetings; all criticism must be constructive; differences of opinion will be recognized and explored; all members will keep others informed on a need-to-know basis, using the Team Contact Information Form. Decision Making processes: Leader decides with team input, majority decides, small group of experts decide, decision by consensus. Improve Communication : Make sure that the roles and responsibilities are clear, listen to your team, review the format for team discussion during meetings, encourage all members to contribute by asking their opinions, deliberately examine opposing points of view, encourage the team to talk often about its goals
  • Team Roles : team leader (shape – dolphins), team advisor, facilitator, process observers or team members, scribe or recorder.
  • Select Members : recruit individuals who can contribute a complementary mix of skill sets (project management skills, financial skills); select individuals with specific problem-solving and decision-making talents; ask for recommendations from your manager and your colleagues; look for individuals who have had team experience; find people who will view this as an opportunity to combine skills and talents with others. The real important thing become attitude. If somebody has the right attitude – they’re enthusiastic, they work hard, and they want something to happen as a result of a project as opposed to just wanting the project to end- they can learn most anything they need to know.
  • Ground Rules : all meetings will start and stop on time; each meeting will have an agenda; all team members will attend and participate in team meetings; all criticism must be constructive; differences of opinion will be recognized and explored; all members will keep others informed on a need-to-know basis, using the Team Contact Information Form. Decision Making processes: Leader decides with team input, majority decides, small group of experts decide, decision by consensus.
  • Improve Communication : Make sure that the roles and responsibilities are clear, listen to your team, review the format for team discussion during meetings, encourage all members to contribute by asking their opinions, deliberately examine opposing points of view, encourage the team to talk often about its goals
  • Focus on collective performance Build collaboration out of conflict: direct the team’s process to stay focused on its goals, encourage sharing of diverse ideas and opinions, use reward systems that make team performance more valuable than individual performance (hotels – waiters have common fund of tips). Keep the team focused and informed on its goals Create a positive culture : everyone feels recognized and comfortable making contributions Empower the team: participative decisions making (consensus), positive reinforcement for participation, Take a periodic time-out : all work and no play makes Jonny a dull boy.
  • An effective team needs diversity in its membership, a combination of work and personality styles. The following four team player styles are not intended to be absolutes but rather preferences that people have towards how they work with others. Each style has a brief description of its strengths and weaknesses. 1. The  Doer  is very task-oriented and action-focused. Give him a job and he’s happy. The Doer is good at research, reliable, meets deadlines, and produces good quality work. He operates by priorities and pushes the team towards higher performance. He can be effective at teaching technical skills. The Doer dislikes uncertainty and ambiguity; is impatient; wants results immediately; can be too focused on data; is impulsive; strives for perfection; and tends to avoid risk. If the Doer is the leader, he must be must be especially careful of these weaknesses. One major problem can be a lack of trust in the team’s members. Moreover, he must be aware of others’ feelings and work at interpersonal and communication skills. 2. The  Visionary  sees the big picture and likes ideas and concepts. She lets the team’s vision and mission be the driver. She doesn’t like getting bogged down in details, leaving these to the Doer. She believes strongly in teamwork and is good at helping others understand where they fit in to the larger picture. The Visionary is a creative thinker and stimulates others in thinking about the future. She takes a cooperative and flexible approach to working with others. However, she must pay attention to her weaknesses. She has a tendency to ignore work in favour of conceptualizing and dreaming about the future. She can get hung up on process instead of results. And she may over-commit the team to setting too many objectives If she’s the leader, the Visionary has a lot to offer the team, especially in the area of long-term strategic thinking. But she must be aware of her weaknesses. 3. The  Feeler  is a very strong context person, making sure that everyone is on board before proceeding with a task or project. He’s very aware of how others feel and is an excellent listener and facilitator. He’s skilled at resolving conflicts and won’t let stronger members dominate team discussions. The Feeler must be careful not to push the soft stuff too hard (i.e., listening and feedback skills) if the team gets bogged down. He believes that interpersonal skills will solve all problems. And he can become a process fanatic, driving the others to distraction. If he is the leader, the Feeler creates a participative atmosphere. But his people approach can be over- bearing and he must not lose sight that disputes are normal and healthy for teams. 4. The  Boat Rocker  is open and direct with the other members of the team. She regularly challenges the team on such issues as methods used, goals, and team values. She won’t hesitate to disagree with the team’s leader or with management. She likes to take calculated risks. However, the Boat Rocker must be careful not to use her style for non-productive use. It’s necessary at times to let an issue drop. Moreover, she shouldn’t push the team to take unnecessary risks. As the team’s leader, she’s good at promoting an atmosphere of trust and openness; innovation; and continuous learning. However, she needs to watch out for being too argumentative. The Challenge Each of us has a personality preference to how we approach work, establish relationships with co-workers, and engage in collaborative learning. In the context of team players, the challenge is for each of us to understand our preferred style and to use it effectively. This means being constantly aware of the shadow (weak) aspects of our preferred style. Moreover, we must strive for balance by using all four styles in the appropriate settings.
  • TEAM VS. THE WALL:  Divide the group into two teams.  Two members of the team hold the rope at about four to five feet above the ground.  The object of the game is to get everyone over the rope.  No one can go under the rope.  Before you start transferring people over the wall, you meet as a team and decide how to get everyone over.  HINT: If group is small, just have them attempt as one big group.
  • Transcript of "Team building"

    1. 1. -----guess----- Prabbal Frank
    2. 2. The Team Concept• What’s in a name? Not every ‘team’ is really a team, and some groups that are called by other names occasionally do phenomenal teamwork.• A group of people who are united in working towards a common goal. – A common goal is a statement that is agreed upon by the team. It provides direction and should offer a challenge that is achievable by the team.
    3. 3. Benefits of a team• Improved performance through broader knowledge and experience base• Greater creativity, wider perspective and increased “People acing together as a group can accomplish things that effectiveness in tackling no individual acting alone could problems ever hope to bring about.” - Franklin Roosevelt
    4. 4. Benefits of a teamworkFOR EMPLOYEES FOR EMPLOYER • Improved production and• Tasks are completed more quickly higher staff morale• Greater job satisfaction • Reduced staff turnover• Work is often more enjoyable – • Increased profits and product happier workplace quality• Ability to draw on other peoples’ experiences and ideas – getting FOR CUSTOMERS support in the workplace • Better products and customer service
    5. 5. • The ability of people to provide complementary skills, a willingness to share knowledge and skills and assist other team members to achieve a common goal
    6. 6. In antiquity, Epicurus stated: "...a captain earns his reputationduring the storms." When your competition scores big againstyou, when the money dries up, or when the glamour of successwears off, this is when it is easiest to compromise yourcommitments. The real test comes when you can hold the lineagainst the easy route of compromise.
    7. 7. Being a good mother does not call for the same qualities as being agood housewife; a dedication to keeping children clean and tidymay override an interest in their separate development asindividuals. - Ann Oakley (British sociologist, 1944)
    8. 8. Accepting change.Change can be in project, duties, power, leader.
    9. 9. • Formation of team happens & the team comes together• Members feel anxious and spend their time finding out about each other• Individual roles and responsibilities are unclear• Highly depending on the manager/leader
    10. 10. • Team members come up with ideas through debates on how to proceed with the task - about task priorities; clarity on purpose of the task; roles & responsibilities and processes to follow• Influence of ideas and power struggles may arise• Compromises may be required to enable progress• Team members may challenge the leader & leader coaches
    11. 11. • Work as a team starts• Roles and responsibilities are clear and accepted• Team begin to exhibit participative behavior & decision making happens by group agreement• Commitment, trust and unity increases
    12. 12. • This stage is characterized by high levels of: goal orientation; interpersonal relations; independence, motivation, - knowledge; competence in team members• Team know what, why & how of the task they are executing• High level of respect in the communication between team members• Team expects delegation of task instead of instruction/assistance
    13. 13. • Identify team roles• Select right kind of team members• Make team goals clear• Establish ground rules including choosing a decision making process• Improve communication in the team
    14. 14. Identify team roles• Team leader (shapes)• Team advisor• Facilitator• Process observers or team members• Scribe or recorder
    15. 15. Select right kind of team members• Contribute a complementary mix of skill sets (project management skills, financial skills)• Specific problem-solving and decision-making talents• Ask for recommendations from your manager and your colleagues• Look for individuals who have had team experience• The real important thing become attitude
    16. 16. Make team goals clear
    17. 17. Establish ground rules• All meetings will start and stop on time;• each meeting will have an agenda;• all team members will attend and participate in team meetings;• all criticism must be constructive; differences of opinion will be recognized and explored;• all members will keep others informed on a need-to-know basis, using the Team Contact Information Form.• Decision Making processes: Leader decides with team input, majority decides, small group of experts decide, decision by consensus.
    18. 18. Improve communication in the team• Make sure that the roles and responsibilities are clear• Listen to your team• Review the format for team discussion during meetings• Encourage all members to contribute by asking their opinions• Deliberately examine opposing points of view• Encourage the team to talk often about its goals
    19. 19. • Focus on collective performance (tips at SRP Inn)• Build collaboration out of conflict• Keep the team focused and informed on its goals• Create a positive culture (everyone feels recognized and comfortable making contributions)• Empower the team (participative decision making, positive reinforcement)• Take a periodic time-out
    20. 20. • Doer• Visionary• Feeler• Boat Rocker
    21. 21. • Very task-oriented and action-focused. Give him a job and he’s happy.• Good at research, reliable, meets deadlines, and produces good quality work. He operates by priorities and pushes the team towards higher performance. He can be effective at teaching technical skills.• Dislikes uncertainty and ambiguity; is impatient; wants results immediately; can be too focused on data; is impulsive; strives for perfection; and tends to avoid risk.• If the Doer is the leader, he must be must be especially careful of these weaknesses. One major problem can be a lack of trust in the team’s members. Moreover, he must be aware of others’ feelings and work at interpersonal and communication skills.
    22. 22. • Sees the big picture and likes ideas and concepts. She lets the team’s vision and mission be the driver. She doesn’t like getting bogged down in details, leaving these to the Doer. She believes strongly in teamwork and is good at helping others understand where they fit in to the larger picture.• Strengths: A creative thinker and stimulates others in thinking about the future. She takes a cooperative and flexible approach to working with others.• Weaknesses: She has a tendency to ignore work in favour of conceptualizing and dreaming about the future. She can get hung up on process instead of results. And she may over-commit the team to setting too many objectives• Leader: the Visionary has a lot to offer the team, especially in the area of long- term strategic thinking. But she must be aware of her weaknesses.
    23. 23. • A very strong context person, making sure that everyone is on board before proceeding with a task or project. He’s very aware of how others feel and is an excellent listener and facilitator.• Strengths: He’s skilled at resolving conflicts and won’t let stronger members dominate team discussions.• Weaknesses: must be careful not to push the soft stuff too hard (i.e., listening and feedback skills) if the team gets bogged down. He believes that interpersonal skills will solve all problems. And he can become a process fanatic, driving the others to distraction.• Leader: the Feeler creates a participative atmosphere. But his people approach can be over- bearing and he must not lose sight that disputes are normal and healthy for teams.
    24. 24. • Open and direct with the other members of the team. She regularly challenges the team on such issues as methods used, goals, and team values. She won’t hesitate to disagree with the team’s leader or with management. She likes to take calculated risks.• Weaknesses: However, the Boat Rocker must be careful not to use her style for non-productive use. It’s necessary at times to let an issue drop. Moreover, she shouldn’t push the team to take unnecessary risks.• Leader: she’s good at promoting an atmosphere of trust and openness; innovation; and continuous learning. However, she needs to watch out for being too argumentative.
    25. 25. • Each of us has a personality preference to how we approach work, establish relationships with co- workers, and engage in collaborative learning.• In the context of team players, the challenge is for each of us to understand our preferred style and to use it effectively. This means being constantly aware of the shadow (weak) aspects of our preferred style.• Moreover, we must strive for balance by using all four styles in the appropriate settings.
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