Adeil is all a-Twitter!
Adeil is all a-Twitter!
Adeil is all a-Twitter!
Adeil is all a-Twitter!
Adeil is all a-Twitter!
Adeil is all a-Twitter!
Adeil is all a-Twitter!
Adeil is all a-Twitter!
Adeil is all a-Twitter!
Adeil is all a-Twitter!
Adeil is all a-Twitter!
Adeil is all a-Twitter!
Adeil is all a-Twitter!
Adeil is all a-Twitter!
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Adeil is all a-Twitter!

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Presentation given at 2010 ADEIL conference on how to get the most out of a conference by using Twitter.

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  • Get your @ on
    Sign up for a Twitter name at Twitter.com. This is how you’re identified in the Twitterverse, with an @ sign in front of it
    Then, you start following and telling people about yourself so they’ll follow you.

    Following and being followed
    Keep in mind that ANYONE can see your tweets. They follow you to be notified when you tweet, and receive it on their page or mobile app.
    To follow someone means you want to receive all of their messages, or Tweets
    Following sometimes calls attention to you, and they reciprocate. Then, you get followers.
    People find you by looking for topics you tweet about, seeing you in someone else’s follower or following list.
    So… You follow someone, and get their tweets. Someone follows you to get your tweets. But it’s not reciprocal unless you follow each other. For instance, I follow Weird Al. I see what he says, but he doesn’t receive what I say because he hasn’t followed me.

    Using Twitter online and mobile

    Twitter.com
    Twitter apps for Smartphones
    Tweetdeck
    Twee
    Tweet Fleet
  • The Meaning of Twife: the Glossary

    Where it’s @
    A Tweet is any message you send in Twitter. You’re not messaging – you’re tweeting. You’re a Tweeter, a Tweep, a Twitterer.
    The @ sign is part of your name in Twitter. When you send a message you want to address to someone in particular, you put @ in front of their name. You can also use the @ sign when talking ABOUT someone, and they’ll see it as a “mention” of their name.
    Those messages are all public, though. If you want to send a private message, that’s a Direct Message or “DM”. I’d say “DM go amick” instead of “@goamick,” then he would be the only one to see what I said.
    ** In order to DM someone, they have to be following you!
    Reply vs ReTweet
    You can reply to someone’s Tweet by putting @Name in front of your message back to them. Some apps do this for you. Remember that it’s public, though.
    If you read a message that’s particularly interesting, you can send it to all of your followers.
    Use my list as example?
    This works like a Forward to your followers. You can add a comment in front of it or just put RT and their message after. You still can’t exceed 140 characters.
    Mentions, hashtags, and searching
    I mentioned “Mention” before. Anytime your name (with @) appears in a tweet, that’s a mention. You can look up your mentions and see who is replying to you or retweeting you.
    Hashtags have # in front of them. This works as a “tag” for a topic. For instance, I’m a big fan of Deadliest Catch. During the show, people tweet about it and use a hashtag of #DeadliestCatch (must be one word! No spaces). This tags it as being relevant to that topic.
    I can then search for that hashtag and see just those tweets.
    This also helps me find people to follow. I can find others with similar interests in the hashtag topic and follow them.
    Trending is when a hashtag becomes very popular. On twitter, you can see a list of what’s “trending” – like Yahoo’s list of most popular searches at that time.
  • Follow the organization's Twitter account.
    Follow other relevant Twitters
    Be sure you're using the right hashtag.
    If you haven't seen what it is, ask the event organizers.
    Make sure you have the apps you want already downloaded to your device
    Laptop, iPad, smartphone, etc.
    Won't lose conference time if you have these and have learned how to use them
    Know what sessions you want to attend ahead of time.
    Some sessions have their own hashtags, so ask about or look for those
    What others are saying.
    Search for the hashtag, then retweet or respond or add your own comments.  Builds connections.
    Follow and be followed
    Sit in the back or on the side of the room.
    If you plan on Tweeting, some people might misinterpret it and be offended.  Sit in the less visible areas (side and back) so that no on is offended or disturbed.
    Quote when possible and use their Twitter name
    Quoting adds authenticity to your comments.  Using the presenter's Twitter name allows you and others to connect with that person.
    After the conference, review the Tweets to build discussion and blog ideas of your own.
    This is good fodder for discussion with other colleagues or students.
    Of course, always attribute others' ideas properly and reference the original source.
    For instance, most of these tips came from the article "7 Tips: How to Tweet During a Live Conference" at http://www.futureofrealestatemarketing.com/2010/07/11/7-tips-how-to-tweet-during-a-live-conference/
  • After the conference, review the Tweets to build discussion and blog ideas of your own.
    This is good fodder for discussion with other colleagues or students.
    Of course, always attribute others' ideas properly and reference the original source.
    For instance, most of these tips came from the article "7 Tips: How to Tweet During a Live Conference" at http://www.futureofrealestatemarketing.com/2010/07/11/7-tips-how-to-tweet-during-a-live-conference/
  • Wish you were here....
    Follow organizations that interest you.
    Use their conference hashtags to keep up with conferences you cannot attend.
    This can also help you network with colleagues you would otherwise not know.
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