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8th Design and Emotion Conference12– 14 September 2012, London, UKCentral Saint Martins College of Art & DesignContending ...
FRAMEWORK                                                     Input:                                                      ...
Research Context  Potentially Stigmatizing Products?  …such as assistive, protective or medical devices                   ...
Research Context  Potentially Stigmatizing Products?  Technology approaching body….what are the limits of acceptability  (...
Dive into the CONTEXT  Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities  andattribution three strategies to co...
Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities  and suggests three strategies to contend product related sti...
Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities  and suggests three strategies to contend product related sti...
Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities  and suggests three strategies to contend product related sti...
Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities  and suggests three strategies to contend product related sti...
Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities  and suggests three strategies to contend product related sti...
Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities  and suggests three strategies to contend product related sti...
Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities  and suggests three strategies to contend product related sti...
Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities  and suggests three strategies to contend product related sti...
1. Re-shaping the socio-societal context                            Meanings attributed by social groups                  ...
1. Re-shaping the socio-societal context                                                      Meanings attributed by socie...
1. Re-shaping the socio-societal context                                                      Possible interventions…    •...
1. Re-shaping the socio-societal context                                                      Possible interventions…    •...
1. Re-shaping the socio-societal context                                                      Possible interventions…    •...
1. Re-shaping the socio-societal context                                                      Possible interventions…    •...
Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities  and suggests three strategies to contend product related sti...
2. Re-shaping product meaning                                                      Strategy 1 / De-identification        T...
2. Re-shaping product meaning                                                      Strategy 1 / De-identification  Conceal...
2. Re-shaping product meaning                                                      Strategy 2 / Identification  Personaliz...
2. Re-shaping product meaning                                                 Strategy 2 / Identification • Individual ide...
2. Re-shaping product meaning                                                 Strategy 2 / Identification • Individual ide...
2. Re-shaping product meaning                                                 Strategy 2 / Identification • Individual ide...
2. Re-shaping product meaning                                                 Strategy 2 / Identification • Individual ide...
2. Re-shaping product meaning                                                      Strategy 3 / Meaningfull interaction  •...
2. Re-shaping product meaning                                                      Strategy 3 / Meaningfull interaction  “...
2. Re-shaping product meaning                                                      Strategy 3 / Meaningfull interaction  “...
2. Re-shaping product meaning                                                      Strategy 3 / Meaningfull interaction  “...
2. Re-shaping product meaning  2.3 Meaningful Interaction                                                      Strategy 3 ...
2. Re-shaping product meaning                                                      Strategy 4 / technology-material       ...
2. Re-shaping product meaning                                                      Strategy 5 / product use  meanings not ...
Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities  and suggests three strategies to contend product related sti...
3. Empowerment                                      “Instrinsic Bucket empowerment ”DRS 2012 | ID 235 - Masked Aversion  ...
3. Empowerment                                      Empowering the user…• ‘Empowering products’ should  make a product use...
3. Empowerment                                      Empowering the user…‘Extra-ability’Instead of adding disabilities, we ...
3. Empowerment                                              Empowering the user…‘Extra-ability’Instead of adding disabilit...
2. Empowerment                                      Empowering the user…‘Extra-ability’Instead of adding disabilities, we ...
Conclusion / discussion                                      The way ahead…             • Is this classification comprehen...
ThanksKristof.vaes@artesis.be          @Miami_Vaes
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Framework-Design and Emotion, September 2012

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Presentation of the conceptual framework to contend product-related stigma.

Presented at the 8th International Design and Emotion Conference
12– 14 September 2012, London, UK
Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design

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Transcript of "Framework-Design and Emotion, September 2012"

  1. 1. 8th Design and Emotion Conference12– 14 September 2012, London, UKCentral Saint Martins College of Art & DesignContending Stigma inProduct DesignUsing Insights from SocialPsychology as a SteppingStone for Design StrategiesKristof Vaes (Artesis Univ. College)Pieter Jan Stappers (TU-Delft)Achiel Standaert (Artesis Univ. College)Kristine Desager (Antwerp Univ.)Artesis University CollegeProduct DevelopmentAntwerp
  2. 2. FRAMEWORK Input: Literature research in social psychology & design research translated to the realm the realm of the designer Product-related stigma Aim: • deeper understanding of the attribution of product related stigma & the relevant context variables. • Expose sensitivities and pitfalls rarely revealed by existing methodology, • Supply vital specifications for a stigma-free design approach. • Starting point for the development of tactical and operational tools.D&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 2
  3. 3. Research Context Potentially Stigmatizing Products? …such as assistive, protective or medical devices Air Jordan Prosthetics Bespoke Innovations™ Designer: Colin Matsco custom craftedD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 3
  4. 4. Research Context Potentially Stigmatizing Products? Technology approaching body….what are the limits of acceptability (in a specific time and societal context) Google GlassesD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 4
  5. 5. Dive into the CONTEXT Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities andattribution three strategies to contendproduct depends on its context. The suggests of a stigmatizing meaning to a product related stigma. ‘the significance of an object is the total of all contexts in which it can be found’ (Krippendorff 2006, p.185) ‘humans do not respond to physical properties of things i.e. their form, structure and function, but to their individual and cultural meanings’. (Krippendorff 2006, p. 196)D&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 5
  6. 6. Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities and suggests three strategies to contend product related stigma. People Products User Human centered Design User Experience Design …D&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 6
  7. 7. Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities and suggests three strategies to contend product related stigma. People Products User Issues of the product user/wearer: • the frustration of having to wear or use a product that damages ones self- esteem • the desire to be perceived as normal • the relief when a passer-by did not notice his assistive or protective device.D&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 7
  8. 8. Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities and suggests three strategies to contend product related stigma. People Products User Groups Society Bystanders Passers-byD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 8
  9. 9. Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities and suggests three strategies to contend product related stigma. People Products User Groups Society Collective representations Active in the absence of peopleD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 9
  10. 10. Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities and suggests three strategies to contend product related stigma. Interpretation of the all quadrants all level model (Wilber 2000)D&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 10
  11. 11. Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities and suggests three strategies to contend product related stigma. Empowering the product user Re-shaping the meaning of the product Re-shaping the socio-societal contextD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 11
  12. 12. Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities and suggests three strategies to contend product related stigma. • It’s a conceptual framework. Will be tailored into operational tools for designers. • All three strategies intertwine • Designers can direct efforts towards each of the strategies and to combine them accordingly.D&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 12
  13. 13. Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities and suggests three strategies to contend product related stigma. Empowering the product user 3 Re-shaping the 2 meaning of the product Re-shaping the 1 socio-societal contextD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 13
  14. 14. 1. Re-shaping the socio-societal context Meanings attributed by social groups Meanings attributed by social groups • This is the context in which users are perceived and evaluated. (Corresponds with immediate situational cues in Major’s model.) • Negative social appreciation for example! Negative reactions of bystanders, passers-by or people within the social interaction range of the product. • In this context we situate aspects such as product stereotypes, or shared meanings or associations linked to a product.D&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 14
  15. 15. 1. Re-shaping the socio-societal context Meanings attributed by society • Bystanders, passers-by or groups might in turn be influenced by a broader objective source of product stereotypes that is shaped by societal structures and values, and vice versa. • Represented by the collective representations in Major’s model. (shared beliefs or shared systems of meaning.) • Collective representations may create what Claude Steele (1997) calls “a threat in the air”. Because they are widely known and shared in the culture.D&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 15
  16. 16. 1. Re-shaping the socio-societal context Possible interventions… • increasing the visibility of a specific product (shear numbers)D&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 16
  17. 17. 1. Re-shaping the socio-societal context Possible interventions… • increasing the visibility of a specific product (shear numbers) • campaigns or interventions that educate or change public viewsD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design
  18. 18. 1. Re-shaping the socio-societal context Possible interventions… • increasing the visibility of a specific product (shear numbers) Integration of the ‘walker’ The ‘Vivanti senior bench’ (Velopa) allows seniors to discretely ‘park’ their walker in • campaigns or interventions the middle of the bench, allowing them to that educate or change participate in the conversation. public viewsD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 18
  19. 19. 1. Re-shaping the socio-societal context Possible interventions… • increasing the visibility of a specific product (shear numbers) • campaigns or interventions that educate or change public views • endorsement by influential political or media figuresD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 19
  20. 20. Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities and suggests three strategies to contend product related stigma. Empowering the product user 3 Re-shaping the 2 meaning of the product Re-shaping the 1 socio-societal contextD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 20
  21. 21. 2. Re-shaping product meaning Strategy 1 / De-identification The priority of design for disability, or that of protective devices, has traditionally been to enable (or protect), while attracting as little attention as possible. (Pullin, 2009)D&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 21
  22. 22. 2. Re-shaping product meaning Strategy 1 / De-identification Concealment Camouflage Diversion of attention • Is a reactive or flight strategy and involve defensive attempts to avoid or reduce the impact of stigma, without actively challenging it. • The use of translucent or skin colored material to hide the obtrusiveness of certain design features.D&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 22
  23. 23. 2. Re-shaping product meaning Strategy 2 / Identification Personalization Pride / Status Sense of belonging • Adds extrinsic value to a product • commonly used in product design through personalization or mass- customization. • Through personalization, the consumer directs time, effort, and attention to the product…thus increasing product attachment.D&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 23
  24. 24. 2. Re-shaping product meaning Strategy 2 / Identification • Individual identity • Institutional identity Tattoo whrist protector • Group identity (sub-culture) • Brands expressing organizational identity Protec helmetD&E 2012 | Contending stigma in product design
  25. 25. 2. Re-shaping product meaning Strategy 2 / Identification • Individual identity A true biker… • Institutional identity • Group identity (sub-culture) • Brands expressing organizational identityD&E 2012 | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 25
  26. 26. 2. Re-shaping product meaning Strategy 2 / Identification • Individual identity A true biker… with a safety vest • Institutional identity • Group identity (sub-culture) • Brands expressing organizational identityD&E 2012 | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 26
  27. 27. 2. Re-shaping product meaning Strategy 2 / Identification • Individual identity • Institutional identity • Group identity (sub-culture) • Brands expressing organizational identity Masks designed by Gucci, Channel, and VersaceD&E 2012 | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 27
  28. 28. 2. Re-shaping product meaning Strategy 3 / Meaningfull interaction • The three strategies we discussed so far are all connected through meaning and human involvement. • Addresses how products relate to each other meaningfully. • It deals with what products do to each other as a consequence of how humans conceive themD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 28
  29. 29. 2. Re-shaping product meaning Strategy 3 / Meaningfull interaction “Hats interacting with Bern winter helmet helmets” Yakkay Bike HelmetD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 29
  30. 30. 2. Re-shaping product meaning Strategy 3 / Meaningfull interaction “Hats interacting with helmets” French looking helmetD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 30
  31. 31. 2. Re-shaping product meaning Strategy 3 / Meaningfull interaction “Hats interacting with “Lamps covering sex- helmets” toys”D&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 31
  32. 32. 2. Re-shaping product meaning 2.3 Meaningful Interaction Strategy 3 / Meaningfull interaction “Earlobe piercing hearing aid” Designaffairs StudioD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 32
  33. 33. 2. Re-shaping product meaning Strategy 4 / technology-material Replacing blind cane with sonar technology ‘Supersonic Stick’ by Minhye KimD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 33
  34. 34. 2. Re-shaping product meaning Strategy 5 / product use meanings not only change over time, but also in their modalities of use. Beetle Cycle Helmet Concept Paul Loury “Eliminate cumbersome issues in use” ‘Supersonic Stick’ by Minhye KimD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 34
  35. 35. Our conceptual framework encompasses four context modalities and suggests three strategies to contend product related stigma. Empowering the product user 3 Re-shaping the 2 meaning of the product Re-shaping the 1 socio-societal contextD&E 2012 | Kristof Vaes | Contending stigma in product design © artesis 2012 | 35
  36. 36. 3. Empowerment “Instrinsic Bucket empowerment ”DRS 2012 | ID 235 - Masked Aversion © artesis 2012 | 36
  37. 37. 3. Empowerment Empowering the user…• ‘Empowering products’ should make a product user feel more capable• Empowerment delivers intrinsic value and meaning for the user• When properly integrated the outcomes of the empowerment strategy can turn the user from a passive victim into an active challenger of stigma.DRS 2012 | ID 235 - Masked Aversion © artesis 2012 | 37
  38. 38. 3. Empowerment Empowering the user…‘Extra-ability’Instead of adding disabilities, we canincrease ones abilities above those ofabled users! Replacing training wheels with the ‘Gyrowheel’ Gyroscopic TrainingDRS 2012 | ID 235 - Masked Aversion © artesis 2012 | 38
  39. 39. 3. Empowerment Empowering the user…‘Extra-ability’Instead of adding disabilities, we canincrease ones abilities above those ofabled users! Aimee MullinDRS 2012 | ID 235 - Masked Aversion © artesis 2012 | 39
  40. 40. 2. Empowerment Empowering the user…‘Extra-ability’Instead of adding disabilities, we canincrease ones abilities above those ofabled users!Emphasis on goals & motivesWhat are peoples’ motives to protect orenhance their self-esteem? The ‘Hövding’ HelmetDRS 2012 | ID 235 - Masked Aversion © artesis 2012 | 40
  41. 41. Conclusion / discussion The way ahead… • Is this classification comprehensive and useful? • Transform the theoretical framing into tactical and operational tools, for designers?DRS 2012 | ID 235 - Masked Aversion © artesis 2012 | 41
  42. 42. ThanksKristof.vaes@artesis.be @Miami_Vaes
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