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Virtual worlds jauregi et al eurocall 2010 slideshare
 

Virtual worlds jauregi et al eurocall 2010 slideshare

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This is the presentation given at Eurocall 2010 about the experiences of implementing Second Life in Language teaching curricula within the NIFLAR project.

This is the presentation given at Eurocall 2010 about the experiences of implementing Second Life in Language teaching curricula within the NIFLAR project.

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  • Focus on  a specific target group language teachers and how new technologies might be an added value. What makes the difference; what is the impact of using ICT for language teaching; when not to use it, data on impact; etc. Maybe one can address the enormous difficulty of measuring the use and impact of ICT on learning. Focus also on the fact that it is not only about using ICT for language learning but that one learns other competences such as citizenship, intercultural awareness, etc… maybe data on this ? Please finish with some key conclusions, statements, recommendations to get the discussion going.
  • SL superior to other CMC insofar as it provides “ a sense of place” which makes learning and indeed socializing in a virtual world a more human experience than many other online environments (Erard 2007) >> social presence Language a resource for doing things & engaging in meaningful co-activity >> these are precisely the contexts that are difficult to create in FL classrooms. Students are cooperatively engaging in event driven scenarios.

Virtual worlds jauregi et al eurocall 2010 slideshare Virtual worlds jauregi et al eurocall 2010 slideshare Presentation Transcript

  • Enhancing meaningful oral interaction in Second Life Kristi Jauregi, Ton Koenraad, Silvia Canto, Rick de Graaff, Utrecht University, TELL Consult, and partners
  • Structure
    • Introduction to NIFLAR
    • Experiences with virtual worlds
      • Pilots
      • Follow-up:
        • Tasks & scenarios
        • Fragments
        • Added value
    • Open-Sim
    • Conclusions
  • Background to NIFLAR
    • Limitations in FLL & teaching contexts. Teaching:
    • Teacher, book and grammar oriented
    • Scarce opportunities for FL learners to engage in meaningful interaction with native peers
    • Intercultural awareness insufficiently addressed (Lace Report, 2007)
    • ICT underused (ICT-Impact Report, 2006)
    • Low motivation, low levels of achievement, possible drop outs (Final Report High Level Group of Multilingualism, 2007)
  • NIFLAR
    • Time span: 1 January 2009 – 31 December 2010
    • Partners: Universities of
      • Utrecht in the Netherlands
      • Granada and Valencia in Spain
      • Coimbra in Portugal
      • Palacky in Olomouc the Czech Republic,
      • Nevsky and Novosibirsk in Russia
      • Concepción in Chile
      • TELL Consult (Netherlands)
      • Secondary schools, in Spain and The Netherlands
      • Coordination: Utrecht University
    • Target languages: Dutch, Portuguese, Russian & Spanish
  • NIFLAR
    • Time span: 1 January 2009 – 31 December 2010
    • Partners: Universities of
      • Utrecht in the Netherlands
      • Granada and Valencia in Spain
      • Coimbra in Portugal
      • Palacky in Olomouc the Czech Republic,
      • Nevsky and Novosibirsk in Russia
      • Concepción in Chile
      • TELL Consult (Netherlands)
      • Secondary schools, in Spain and The Netherlands
      • Coordination: Utrecht University
    • Target languages: Dutch, Portuguese, Russian & Spanish
    • To enrich and innovate academic programs of foreign languages and make them more rewarding and relevant
    • Promoting blended learning
    • Through the use of two virtual environments:
      • Video web communication (Adobe Connect)
      • 3D Virtual Worlds (Second Life / Open SIM)
    • To study the added value of implementing networked interactions
    • Two target groups:
      • FL learners at secondary and tertiary levels
      • Pre- (in) service teachers
    Main objectives of NIFLAR:
  • Second Life Open Sim Adobe connect
  • Experiences with virtual worlds in NIFLAR
    • June-July 2009: first pilot experience with Second Life
    • Explore the possibilities of the existing world
    • TL: Spanish
    • 2 NS (U Valencia & Granada)
    • 2NNS (U Utrecht)
    • Volunteers
    • 4 exploratory tasks:
      • ICC (x4) - Sharing exploration (x2)
      • Exploring (x2) - Evaluation (x4)
    • Sessions recorded
  • Exploring the affordances of VWs
    • Opportunities for real-life and virtual synchronous voiced communication & collaboration with (native) speakers of the target language
    • Opportunities for creating culture-specific virtual scenarios for contextualised social communication
    • Opportunities for action learning (Deutschmann et al. 2009)
    • Multimodal interaction (Hauck, 2010)
    • Resort to a sound pedagogical teaching approach > TBLT (Willis 1996, Ellis 2003)
  • Pilot 2: November-december 2010
    • Scenarios for interaction task driven
    • Participants:
      • -4 student teachers (Valencia, Granada)
      • - 8 FLL of Spanish (Utrecht)
    • Integration in language course (B2)
    • Scenarios for 5 tasks developed
    • Sessions recorded and evaluated > follow-up
  • Task effectiveness for language learners and student teachers
    • Enhancing FL intercultural communicative competence (ICC) (Byram, 1997 ):
        • Oral interaction
        • Intercultural awareness
    • Facilitating pedagogical awareness on:
        • ICC
        • Challenges and opportunities of VW
        • Task elaboration
        • Interaction processes
        • Teaching skills
  • Criteria for task design in virtual worlds
    • Design principles:
    • For communicative competence in L2 acquisition ( Willis, 1996; Doughty & Long, 2003; Ellis, 2003; Moonen, 2007)
    • For intercultural competence in L2 acquisition (Byram, 1997; Müller-Jacquier, 2003)
    • For the application of VW in L2 acquisition (Deutschmann, Panichi & Molka, 2009)
  • Design principles for communicative L2 competence
    • Exposure to rich , authentic , multimodal and contextually relevant language input
    • Elicitation of meaningful , contextually appropriate language use
    • Focus on language form alonside meaning
    • Convergent communicative outcome as a result of negotiation of meaning
  • Design principles for intercultural L2 competence
    • Taking conceptions and misconceptions in daily life as a starting point, focus on intercultural contrasts and similarities
    • Need to understand each other’s point of view/reference for task completion
    • In order to develop attitudes of openness and curiosity, enlarge intercultural knowledge , enhance skills of discovery and mediation in interaction, and critical awareness (Byram, 1997)
  • Follow-up
    • February – April 2010
    • Part of a bigger research study (2 experimental & 1 cotrol groups)
    • TL: Spanish, B1
    • Tasks integrated in academic curricula (obligatory for FLls)
    • Participants: 14 FLls (UU) & 7 pre-service teachers (UV)
    • Interaction formats: tryads
    • Tutorials + 5 interaction sessions (1-2 hours)
    • Data: recordings, pre-mid- and post-questionnaires, interviews, pre- & post-tests
  • Research issues
    • What is the value of implementing virtual interaction (in Second Life) in language teaching curricula?
      • Meaningfulness
      • Impact on motivation: Willingness to communicate ( MacIntyre et al. 2001)
        • Perceived competence
        • Communication anxiety
  • Meaningful interaction
    • Meaning-focused, authentic/realistic, interpersonal, spontaneous (Krashen, 1982)
    • Social (Lantolf, 2006) and transactional (social & intertersonal, information and opinion gap)
    • Balanced engagement (Dörnyei & Cisar, 2005)
    • Context dependent: taking into account the specific affordances of the virtual environment: action learning, multimodality
    • LL: Relevant for SLA:
      • NEGOTIATION OF LINGUISTIC MEANING (comprehension / production) both linguistic and cultural (focus on form) (Doughty & Long, 2003; Long, 1996; Swain, 1985; Varonis & Gass, 1986)
      • NEGOTIATION OF INTERCULTURAL MEANING (Belz, 2005; Byram, 1997; Müller-Jacquier 2003)
    • Student teacher: Pedagogic rich exposure
  • Tasks in Second Life Task 1
    • Brilliant people !
    • -pre-task & task
    • NS & FLL
    • Scenarios :
    • - Participants go to an appartment : look around, exchange info, watch pictures, eat and drink
    • Decide where to go: cinema , Valencia , museum
    • Describe a brilliant person
  • Meaningful fragments: task 1 Exchanging info about appartment. Click here to activate the recording. Sharing info about pictures Click here to activate the recording. Click here to activate the recording.
  • Tasks in Second Life Task 2
    • People and adventures:
    • -pre-task & task
    • NS & FLL
    • Scenarios:
    • - Participants meet at a restaurant and have to decide where to go to on holidays: winter/summer holidays.
    • Go to a hotel (reception/room)
    • - Depending on their choice go to the summer or winter slurl
  • Meaningful fragments: task 2 Click here to activate the recording.
  • Task 3 Scenarios: Participants choose 2 out of these possible scenes: - Birthday party / guests for dinner - At the bar / on the bus People and films: Preparing, filming and evaluating scenes
  • Meaningful fragments: task 3 Requests Greetings
  • Task 4 People with heart: Exchange info about social groups / identity Describe pictures and compare Scenarios: Appartment
  • Task 5 People & cultures: Cultural contest Scenarios: TV studio
  • Task 5: meaningful fragments Recordings Recordings
  • Impact project on motivation My competence in the target language is sufficient to communicate with natives Start interaction sessions
  • I like speaking to native speakers in the target language Start interaction sessions
  • I get very worried if I make mistakes when interacting in the target language Start interaction sessions
  • I feel nervous when speaking in the target language Start interaction sessions
  • Results post-questionnaires:The environment X: 3,64; N:14)
  • Results mid/post-questionnaires:Tasks
  •  
  • Results post-questionnaires: speech partner
  • Results post-questionnaires: learning
  • Results post-questionnaires: learning To talk more fluently
  •  
  • Conclusions:The added value of integrating virtual interaction in education (1)
    • Challenging , motivating and innovative learning environment.
    • Offer opportunities for real-life and virtual synchronous communication with native speakers of the target language.
    • Rich linguistic and intercultural learning sequences emerge.
    • Environment triggered communication sequences emerge: spontaneous language use
    • Collaborative learning and learner autonomy are enhanced.
  • The added value of integrating virtual interaction in education (2)
    • Participants favour experiences of enjoyment and success.
    • Support authenticity of learning by favouring motivation.
    • Allows for action learning: l anguage a resource for doing things & engaging in meaningful co-activity (Thorne, 2010)
    • Significant impact of SL tasks on willingness to communicate .
    • Intersubjectivity and social empathy are enhanced
  • Would you like to know more about NIFLAR?
    • Come and visit our session tomorrow on teacher skills
    • from 14.00-15.30!
    • Join us in
    • niflar.ning.com
    • www.niflar.eu
    • Thank you for your attention!!