History, Science, and Trade

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History, Science, and Trade

  1. 1. History, Science, and Trade By Kristi Beria
  2. 2. What is History? <ul><li>History is a story. </li></ul><ul><li>A collection of events interpreted by what relevance it has to us. </li></ul><ul><li>Responsible history requires proof from at least three sources: reliable witness, logical possibility, and observable causes. </li></ul><ul><li>Advances in science and technology have explained some historical mysteries. </li></ul><ul><li>History will always change because we will always question. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Science <ul><li>Advances in science are confirming and debunking historical mysteries. </li></ul><ul><li>DNA studies conducted by geneticist Spencer Wells has shown that all humans descend from a single ancestor in Africa. </li></ul><ul><li>Infrared photography helped to make the Dead Sea Scrolls readable. </li></ul><ul><li>As more technologies are developed, more answers will be found, which will then lead to more questions. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Natural Disasters <ul><li>Natural disasters have had a role in the shaping of history. </li></ul><ul><li>In the sixth century there was a massive cooling of Earth’s temperature caused by an enormous volcanic eruption. </li></ul><ul><li>Sunlight was reduced by ash and caused colder temperatures. </li></ul><ul><li>Both droughts and flooding rain across the world wreaked havoc with the food supply. </li></ul><ul><li>This effect lasted from 10 to 20 years. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Disease <ul><li>Diseases have changed the course of history. </li></ul><ul><li>The cold temps due to volcanic eruptions during the sixth century allowed the bacteria that causes the plague to flourish. </li></ul><ul><li>Millions of people in the Roman empire were wiped out, which may have contributed to the collapse of the once great empire. </li></ul><ul><li>Huge population reduction of the Celts allowed the British to move into empty lands allowing England to be born. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Trade <ul><li>Trade brought new goods, food, and diseases to different parts of the world. </li></ul><ul><li>Mesoamerican traders traveled equal to the distance between Spain and Finland. </li></ul><ul><li>China traded its silks to the British and Dutch who paid for them with silver from Mexico. </li></ul><ul><li>Although people had traded for centuries, </li></ul><ul><li>Christopher Columbus’ voyage </li></ul><ul><li>united communities around the globe. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Trade in the New World <ul><li>As a result of Columbus’ voyages, the world was introduced to potatoes, spices, peanuts, chocolate, coffee and tea, and tobacco. </li></ul><ul><li>Not all of these relationships were beneficial to both trading parties. </li></ul><ul><li>England’s addiction to tea caused them to import opium from India into China. </li></ul><ul><li>The addiction to sugar caused the import of 10 million slaves from Africa to Haiti to work on the plantations. </li></ul><ul><li>Whether good or bad, trade changed the way that most people in this world live. </li></ul>

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