De asaster

376 views
314 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
376
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
22
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

De asaster

  1. 1. Philippine Hazards, Vulnerabilities & RisksBERMEJO, JOHN JULIUS O,RT3 Pateros Rescue UnitMunicipality of PaterosNational Capital Region
  2. 2. Philippine Disasters
  3. 3. TYPES OF HAZARDS PRESENT IN THE COUNTRY:1. Natural Hazards Hydro-meteorological Geological2. Human induced hazards Technological Environmental Socio-Economic, Political, Security Hazards
  4. 4. Natural Hazards Hydro-Meteorological Hazards Cyclone Typhoon Tornado Thunderstorm Flood Storm Surge Global Warming Extreme Climatic Variabilities Drought
  5. 5. THUNDERSTORM
  6. 6. CUMULONIMBUS CLOUDS 12,000 m 9,000 m 6,000 m 3,000 m
  7. 7. Forked Lightning Sheet Lightning Ball LightningCrooked lightning Clouds, rain blocks On rare occasions,bolts discharge from small glowing balls forked lightning bolt,cloud to ground or but flash illuminatesloops from the cloud,cloud to air clouds. but quickly vanish.
  8. 8. Sample pictures of hail
  9. 9. SOUTHWEST MONSOON (HABAGAT) N W E S
  10. 10. NORTHEAST MONSOON (AMIHAN) Cold air from Siberia NW E S
  11. 11. INTERTROPICAL CONVERGENCE ZONE
  12. 12. TROPICAL CYCLONE
  13. 13. Satellite Picture of Typhoon Feria
  14. 14. 5 cyclones 2 cyclones in 2 yrs per year FREQUENCY OF PASSAGE5 cyclones in 3 yrs 3 cyclones OF TROPICAL CYCLONES in 2 yrs BY GEOGRAPHICAL ZONES IN THE PHILIPPINES1 cyclone per year 1 cyclone in 12 yrs
  15. 15. CLASSIFICATION OFTROPICAL CYCLONE  Tropical Depression ( less than 64 KPH )  Tropical Storm ( 64 to 117 KPH )  Typhoon (greater than 117 KPH )
  16. 16. Floods
  17. 17. It is an 8-160 km wide dome of water that sweeps over the coastline during landfall of a tropical cyclone.Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA)
  18. 18. Communities with a steeper continental will not see as much surge inundationPhilippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA)
  19. 19. A shallow slope off the coast will allow a greater surge to inundatecoastal communities.Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA)
  20. 20. FREQUENCY OF TROPICAL CYCLONE (44 YEAR PERIOD)PROVINCE TD TS TY TOTALAGUSAN DEL NORTE 6 6 11 23AGUSAN DEL SUR 6 4 3 13ILOCOS NORTE 5 12 28 45ILOCOS SUR 6 14 31 51ISABELA 9 16 22 47LANAO DEL NORTE 0 1 1 2LANAO DEL SUR 0 1 1 2LEYTE 8 13 23 44MAGUINDANAO 0 0 1 1METRO MANILA 3 24 9 36MINDORO 3 14 33 50MISAMIS OCCIDENTAL 1 1 1 3MISAMIS ORIENTAL 1 2 0 3NEGRO OCCIDENTAL 6 8 21 35NEGROS ORIENTAL 6 8 21 35NORTHERN SAMAR 11 13 36 60
  21. 21. Philippine Area of Responsibility
  22. 22. NAMES OF TROPICAL CYCLONE IN THE PHILIPPINES I II III IV 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2011 2012 2010 A AURING AGATON AMANG AMBO B BISING BASYANG BEBENG BUTCHOY C CRISING CALOY CHEDENG COSME D DANTE DOMENG DODONG DINDO E EMONG ESTER EGAY ENTENG F FERIA FLORITA FALCON FRANK G GORIO GLENDA GORING GENER H HUANING HENRY HANNA HELEN I ISANG INDAY INENG IGME J JOLINA JUAN JUANING JULIAN K KIKO KATRING KABAYAN KAREN L LABUYO LUIS LANDO LAWIN M MARING MILENYO MINA MARCE N NANDO NENENG NONOY NINA O ONDOY OMPONG ONYOK OFEL P PEPENG PAENG PEDRING PABLO Q QUEDAN QUEENIE QUIEL QUINTA R RAMIL REMING RAMON ROLLY S SANTI SENIANG SENDONG SIONY T TINO TOMAS TISOY TONYO U URDUJA USMAN URSULA UNDING V VINTA VENUS VIRING VIOLETA W WILMA WALDO WENG WINNIE Y YOLANDA YAYANG YOYOY YOYONG Z ZORAIDA ZENY ZIGZAG ZOSIMO
  23. 23. Drought & Fish Kill
  24. 24. WHY DO EXTREME WEATHER &CLIMATIC CONDITIONS DEVELOP THESE PAST YEARS ? ? ?
  25. 25. Earth’s Ozone Layer Depletion
  26. 26. What does the climate system consist of?Schematic view of the components of the climate system, their processesand interactions the climate system a complex system (atmosphere1, land 2surface, snow 3and ice, oceans and4 other bodies of water, and living5 things)
  27. 27. A diagram of the natural greenhouse effect A diagram showing how additionalon earth, where the Earths temperature is greenhouse gases trap more heat in thekept constant to support life. Earth’s atmosphere and raises the temperature.
  28. 28. Natural HazardsGeological Phenomena and Hazards Earthquake Tsunami Volcanic Eruption Astronomical Hazards
  29. 29. Earthquakes occur within the Philippine Archipelago every now and then mainly because the country is situated alongtwomajor tectonic plates of the world – the PACIFIC PLATES and the EURASIAN PLATES.
  30. 30. Geological Hazards July 16, 1990; Intensity 81,666 dead – 3,500 injured P11B cost of damage in property P1.2B in agriculture
  31. 31. The Philippine Archipelago occupies the western ring of the Pacific Ocean (WesternSegment of the Pacific Ring of Fire), a most active part of the earth that is characterized by anocean-encircling belt of active volcanoes and earthquake generators (faults).
  32. 32. Like floating pieces of a 3D jigsaw puzzle, theEarths plates that form the crust of the Earthare not locked in place. On the contrary, theplates are always in motion and it is notalways a smooth ride. We may not see theplates as they move against each other, butwe can sometimes feel the result in the form ofearthquakes.
  33. 33. A trench is a type of excavation ordepression in the ground. Trenches aregenerally defined by being deeper than theyare wide (as opposed to a wider gully or ditch), and by being narrow compared totheir length (as opposed to a simple hole)
  34. 34. A fault is a planar fracture ordiscontinuity in a volume of rock,across which there has beensignificant displacement. Large faultswithin the Earths crust result from theaction oftectonic forces. Energyrelease associated with rapidmovement on active faults is the causeof most earthquakes
  35. 35. What is the Valley Fault System?The Valley Fault System, also known asthe Marikina Valley Fault System, is a group ofdextral strike-slip fault which extends from SanMateo, Rizal to Taguig City on the south; runningthrough the cities of Makati, Marikina,Paranaque, Pasig and Taguig.
  36. 36. Earthquake Hazards
  37. 37. Sink Hole
  38. 38. Liquefaction
  39. 39. Japan Nuclear Meltdown
  40. 40. Nuclear Radiation Exposed
  41. 41. Geological Hazards(Effect of an Earthquake) Affects the country’s coastal areas up to four meters above sea level. The coastal areas of southwest Mindanao are most vulnerable
  42. 42. Tsunami Moro Gulf Earthquake 1976
  43. 43. Geological Hazards Mt. Pinatubo - The worst volcanic eruption of the century June 1991 800 - dead P10.6B - damage
  44. 44. . Barren Island, Andaman SeaYou can find this volcano in the Andaman Sea. This is the only volcano that is still activein South Asia. Most part of the volcano lies below the ocean and its peak can be seen at aheight of 354 meters. Its first recorded eruption took place as far back as 1787. Since thenit has erupted more than 6 times.
  45. 45. Major eruptions alter the Earths radiativebalance because volcanic aerosol cloudsabsorb terrestrial radiation, and scatter asignificant amount of the incoming solarradiation, an effect known as "radiativeforcing" that can last from two to threeyears following a volcanic eruption.
  46. 46. Astronomical Hazards
  47. 47. Human Induced HazardsHuman Induced Hazards  Air & Maritime Disaster  Fire  Vehicular Accidents  Hazardous Material/Chemical Spill  Red Tide/Food Poisoning  Socio Political Hazards  Complex Emergencies
  48. 48. Technological Hazards April 19, 2000Air Philippines Flight 541 crashed in the mountains of Mindanao. All 120 passengers and crew died
  49. 49. Maritime Disaster
  50. 50. Vehicular Accident
  51. 51. Environmental Hazards Payatas Dump Site Tragedy July 10, 2000 224 dead – 38 missing
  52. 52. Environmental Hazards Affects 8 million residents from the coastal areas whose livelihood are affected Almost every year, there have been reported cases of deaths due to paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP)
  53. 53. Man-Made Hazards MANOR HOTEL FIRE TRAGEDY August 18, 2001 LUNG CENTER BLAZE May 17, 1998 THE OLD ORPHANAGE December 3, 1998 THE OZONE DISCO March 1996
  54. 54. Chemical, Biological, Radiological Nuclear Emergencies
  55. 55. Socio-Political/Security Hazards Political Destabilization
  56. 56. Socio-Political/Security Hazards BASHIR HAMBALI IMRON DWIKARNA AMROZI BAFANA Terrorist Attack by Local / International Terrorist Groups
  57. 57. Socio-Political/Security Hazards
  58. 58. Socio-Political/Security HazardsBOMBING INCIDENTS
  59. 59. Socio-Political/Security Hazards Massive collateral damage to OFWs in or near conflict areas abroad
  60. 60. TOP 10 MOST HAZARDOUS DISEASES OF THE 21ST CENTURY1. RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS2. HIV / AIDS3. MALARIA4. DIARRHOEA5. TUBERCULOSIS6. MEASLES7. WHOOPING COUGH8. TETANUS9. MENINGITIS10.SYPHILIS
  61. 61. NDCC Memo Order No. 4, dtd 04Mar98 At least 20% of the population are affected & inneed of emergency assistance or those dwellingunits have been destroyed A great number or at least 40% of the meansof livelihood such as bancas, fishing boats,vehicles and the like are destroyed
  62. 62. NDCC Memo Order No. 4, dtd 04Mar98 Major roads and bridges are destroyed andimpassable for at least a week, thus disrupting theflow of transport and commerce Widespread destruction of fishponds, crops,poultry and livestock, and other agriculturalproducts, and Epidemics
  63. 63. Hydro Meteorological Disaster
  64. 64. Geological Disaster
  65. 65. Why the need for State of Calamity Area Declaration? To facilitate relief and rehabilitation efforts in calamity-affected areas To control prices and prevent hoarding of basic commodities To carry out remedial measures in the affected areas such as grant of calamity loans to disaster victims, moratorium in the payment of taxes and release of funds from the national and local governments.
  66. 66. Vulnerable Groups
  67. 67. Young
  68. 68. Poor Families
  69. 69. Elderly
  70. 70. Persons with Disability
  71. 71. Pregnant Women
  72. 72. Republic Act No. 10121 “The Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010” (DRRM Act of 2010)∗Approved May 27, 2011∗*Implementing Rules and Regulations was approved onSeptember 17, 2010
  73. 73. vulnerability reduced risk assessments, plans, arrangements, training & exercisesreduce risk,vulnerability & hazard hazard/risk analysis Mitigation Preparedness mostly back to normal disaster / emergency Rehabilitation Response situation “ healing”, repair, stabilized reconstruction & recovery no longer direct threat to life/safety and property
  74. 74. Our countrys geographic location makes us prone to hazards.∗ The most effective strategy to minimize adverse effects of disasters remain to be mitigation and preparedness.∗ National Government cannot provide everything, it must establish disaster response-force multipliers in LGUs throughout the country.
  75. 75. IN THE EVENT OF MULTIPLE OCCURRENCE OF DISASTER∗ Each member of the community must secure first his/her self/family’s safety∗ After securing the safety of the family, help others who needs to be helped∗ Communities shall rely on their own capability in addressing the disaster.
  76. 76. HOW CAN WE HELP ? Limiting the use of pollutants Reduce Reuse and Recycle Plant Trees Be prepared Share your knowledge and skills in disaster preparedness Be an advocate of Disaster Risk Reduction & Management ORGANIZE A DISASTER MANAGEMENT TEAM IN YOUR OWN COMMUNITY TRAIN & ACTIVATE BRGY. EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAMS
  77. 77. BUILDING THE RESILIENCE OF NATIONS AND COMMUNITIES TO DISASTERS ∗ The Hyogo Framework of Action is a 10-year plan to make the world safer from natural hazards.∗ Adopted by 168 Member States of the United Nations in 2005 at the World Disaster Reduction Conference.∗ HFA is the first plan to explain, describe and detail the work that is required from all different sectors and actors to reduce disaster losses. It was developed and agreed on with the many partners needed to reduce disaster risk - governments, international agencies, disaster experts and many others.
  78. 78. Hyogo Framework of Action Priority Action∗ Priority Action 1: Ensure that disaster risk reduction is a national and a local priority with a strong institutional basis for implementation.∗ Priority Action 2: Identify, assess and monitor disaster risks and enhance early warning.∗ Priority Action 3: Use knowledge, innovation and education to build a culture of safety and resilience at all levels.
  79. 79. Hyogo Framework of Action Priority Action∗ Priority Action 4: Reduce the underlying risk factors.∗ Priority Action 5: Strengthen disaster preparedness for effective response at all levels.
  80. 80. "Disaster risk reduction is an obligation for all -- donors, governments and the privatesector. We cannot wait for more disasters to happen to understand the benefits of Disaster Risk Reduction policies.“-- Toni Frisch, Swiss Humanitarian Aid Department
  81. 81. The Paradigm Shift∗ Disaster is an abnormal situation∗ The citizenry looked up at government for support where most of the resources are present∗ Local government are the victims, at times are confused and don’t know what to do∗ Our bureaucracy and other rules and regulations are for normal times
  82. 82. The Paradigm Shift (cont.)∗ Decisions during the first five minutes will affect the management for the next five days∗ You cannot quantify lives; every victim has the right to be rescued, to be treated, and to be supported to be able to go back to his normal life ; every dead has the right to be identified, to be buried with dignity
  83. 83. Things to remember;∗ Plan ahead. It wasn’t raining when Noah built the Ark.∗ Stay fit, as this maybe required when time comes.∗ Remember, the Ark was built by amateurs, the Titanic was made by professionals.∗ No matter what the storm, when you are ready and your with GOD, there’s always a rainbow waiting.
  84. 84. “WE PREVENT DISASTERS IF WE MANAGE EMERGENCIES”
  85. 85. Thank You for SLEEPING! Always Stay SAFE!Source: National Geographic DOST, PHIVOLCS PAG-ASA Hyogo Framework
  86. 86. BANDAGING1.) WOUND AT THE BACK OF THE HEAD2.) CHEST BANDAGE3.) BACK OF CHEST4.) ARM SLING5.) UNDERARM SLING6.) HAND BANDAGE7.) FOREHEAD BANDAGE8.) CHEEK, EAR, AND JAW BANDAGE9.) FOREARM BANDAGE10.) PALM BANDAGE (VERTICAL ANDHORIZONTAL)11.) ELBOW AND KNEE BANDAGE12.) SPRAINED ANKLE (SHOE ON AND SHOE OFF)
  87. 87. RESCUE TRANSFER AND CARRIES
  88. 88. ASSIST TO WALK
  89. 89. PIGGY BACK CARRY
  90. 90. FIREMAN’S DRAG
  91. 91. BLANKET DRAG
  92. 92. SHOULDER DRAG
  93. 93. CHAIR AS A LITTER
  94. 94. FOUR-HAND SEAT
  95. 95. BEARERS ALONG SIDE(FOR NARROW ALLEYS)HAMMOCK CARRY
  96. 96. BLANKET CARRY

×