Introduction to Project Management

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This is my publication on the introduction to project management. In this publication I overview important project management terms, definitions, project life cycles, and key project management software and tools

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Introduction to Project Management

  1. 1. INTRODUCTION TO PROJECT MANAGEMENT by Kris Kimmerle
  2. 2. ABOUT THE AUTHOR PROJECT MANAGEMENT 2
  3. 3. Certifications Hi. I have My name is Kris Kimmerle. I am training for I have 9 years of comprehensive and international experience in the following domains. Business Continuity Planning Security Intelligence Technician Project Management Chain of Custody Duty Segregation Disaster Recovery Planning Physical Security Management Agile Project Management Change Management Defense-in-Depth Risk Management Security Operations Management SharePoint Administrator IdM Solutions Supply Chain Processes Vulnerability Management Business Operations Management Enterprise Application Development Repudiation Enterprise Risk Management Threat Profiling Information Security Instructor Enterprise Architecture Automation ISO 27000 Family of Standards Compliance Management Third Party Risk Management Enterprise Security Architecture Security Awareness Simplicity in Complex Security Auditor Asset Management Security Analyst Access Control Flexibility in Security Information Security Instructor Network Operations Cloud Computing MySQL Interoperability PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3
  4. 4. Let’s get started. PROJECT MANAGEMENT 4
  5. 5. PURPOSE PROJECT MANAGEMENT 5
  6. 6. ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ Basic understanding of project management terms and definitions Basic understanding of project stages, objectives, and deliverables Basic knowledge of project management software tools Introduction to essential project management references Introduction to highly specialized project management methodologies PROJECT MANAGEMENT 6
  7. 7. TERMINOLOGY PROJECT MANAGEMENT 7
  8. 8. 👤👤 🏃🏃 💃💃 Project Manager Project Team Project Stakeholders Professional in the field of project management. Responsible of the planning, execution, and closing of any project, typically relating to construction industry, architecture, computer networking, telecommunications or software development. The management team leading the project, and provide services to the project. Projects often bring together a variety number of problems. Stakeholders have important issues with others. Those entities within or without an organization which sponsor a project or, have an interest or a gain upon a successful completion of a project. PROJECT MANAGEMENT 8
  9. 9. 📅📅 🎉🎉 🔖🔖 Schedule Project Plan Kickoff Meeting This consists of a list of a project's terminal elements with intended start and finish dates. is a formal, approved document used to guide both project execution and project control. The first meeting with the project team and the client of the project. PROJECT MANAGEMENT 9
  10. 10. 📃📃 🔢🔢 ☑ WBS Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) is a tool that defines a project and groups the project’s discrete work elements in a way that helps organize and define the total work scope of the project. Tasks Gantt Chart in project management are activity that needs to be accomplished within a defined period of time. Type of bar chart that illustrates a project schedule. It illustrate the start and finish dates of the terminal elements and summary elements of a project. Terminal elements and summary elements comprise the work breakdown structure of the project. PROJECT MANAGEMENT 10
  11. 11. 🎯🎯 💥💥 🐛🐛 Scope Scope Creep Risk of a project in project management is the sum total of all of its products and their requirements or features. refers to uncontrolled changes in a project's scope. This phenomenon can occur when the scope of a project is not properly defined, documented, or controlled. It is generally considered a negative occurrence that is to be avoided. is the precise probability of specific eventualities. PROJECT MANAGEMENT 11
  12. 12. OVERVIEW PROJECT MANAGEMENT 12
  13. 13. What is Project Management? The discipline of planning, organizing, and managing resources to bring about the successful completion of specific project goals and objectives. A project is a finite endeavor (having specific start and completion dates) undertaken to create a unique product or service which brings about beneficial change or added value. This finite characteristic of projects stands in sharp contrast to processes, or operations, which are permanent or semi-permanent functional work to repetitively produce the same product or service. ⏳ PROJECT MANAGEMENT 13
  14. 14. All Projects… Have a Start. Have an End. Are Temporary. Are Unique. PROJECT MANAGEMENT 14
  15. 15. Project Management Knowledge Domains Integration. Human Resources. Scope. Communications. Procurement. Cost. Stakeholder Management. Quality. Time. Risk Management. PROJECT MANAGEMENT 15
  16. 16. TRADITIONAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT PROJECT MANAGEMENT 16
  17. 17. Project Management Stages Regardless of the methodology used, the project development process will have the same major stages: initiation, development, implementation, monitoring, and closing. The approach and any considerations need to be clarified prior to the project objectives, goals, and importantly, the roles and responsibilities of all participants and stakeholders. The use of a project control system (i.e. Microsoft Office Project), help assure that projects are developed successfully Closure Monitor & Control Execution Planning Initiation Definition PROJECT MANAGEMENT 17
  18. 18. Overview of Stages Definition Initiation Before a project starts the project manager must make sure the project goals, objectives, scope, risks, issues, budget, timescale and approach have been defined. This must be communicated to all the stakeholders to get their agreement. Any differences of opinion need to be resolved before work starts. This is perhaps the most important stage of any project as it sets the terms of reference within which the project will be run. If this is not done well, the project will have a high likelihood of failure. The initiation stage is where the business case is declared, scope of the project decided and stakeholder expectations set. Time spent on planning, refining the business case and communicating the expected benefits will help increase the likelihood of success. It is tempting to start working quickly, but a poor initiation stage often leads to problems and even failure. Planning The key to a successful project is in the planning. Creating a project plan is the first task you should do when undertaking any project. Often project planning is ignored in favor of getting on with the work. However, many people fail to realize the value of a project plan in saving time, money and many other problems. Execution Doing the work to deliver the product, service or wanted result. Most of the work related to the project is realized at this stage and needs complete attention from the project manager. Monitor & Control Closure Once the project is running it is important the project manager keeps control. This is achieved by regular reporting of issues, risks, progress and the constant checking of the business case to ensure that expected benefits will be delivered and are still valid. A project that is not controlled is out of control. Often neglected, it is important to ensure a project is closed properly. Many projects never end because there is no formal sign-off. It is important to get the customers agreement that a project has ended and no more work will be carried out. Once closed, the project manager should review the project and record the good and bad points, so successes can be repeated and failures avoided. A project that is not closed will continue to consume resources. PROJECT MANAGEMENT 18
  19. 19. Definition Stage Before a project starts the project manager must make sure the project goals, objectives, scope, risks, issues, budget, timescale and approach have been defined. This must be communicated to all the stakeholders to get their agreement. Any differences of opinion need to be resolved before work starts. The Objectives The Deliverables ⬜ Establish realistic expectations with participants ☑ Preliminary project timeline ⬜ Define the project as to a relative time frame ☑ Preliminary project scope ⬜ Determine and define participants roles & responsibilities ☑ Preliminary roles & responsibilities ⬜ Develop approaches to manage project scope and issues ☑ Preliminary guidelines for communication ⬜ Define project guidelines for communication ▶ PROJECT MANAGEMENT 19
  20. 20. Initiation Stage This is perhaps the most important stage of any project as it sets the terms of reference within which the project will be run. If this is not done well, the project will have a high likelihood of failure. The initiation stage is where the business case is declared, scope of the project decided and stakeholder expectations set. Time spent on planning, refining the business case and communicating the expected benefits will help increase the likelihood of success. It is tempting to start working quickly, but a poor initiation stage often leads to problems and even failure. The Objectives ⬜ Review Project Statement of Work ⬜ Review of Project Enterprise Environmental Factors ⬜ The Deliverables Review of Project Organizational Assets ▶ ☑ Develop Project Charter ☑ Develop Preliminary Project Scope Statement PROJECT MANAGEMENT 20
  21. 21. Planning Stage The key to a successful project is in the planning. Creating a project plan is the first task you should do when undertaking any project. Often project planning is ignored in favor of getting on with the work. However, many people fail to realize the value of a project plan in saving time, money and many other problems. The Objectives ⬜ ⬜ ⬜ ⬜ ⬜ ⬜ ⬜ The Deliverables ☑ Perform Scope Definition and Planning ☑ Create Project WBS Define Project Activities and Sequence Define Each Activities Resource cost and duration Establish Risk Management Plan with initial Risk Identification Establish Risk Analysis and Response Planning ▶ ☑ ☑ ☑ ☑ Create Scope Management Plan Create Activity Plan Create Quality Assurance Plan Create Human Resource Plan Create Project Communication Plan Create Risk Management Plan Plan Project Purchases, Acquisitions, and Contracting PROJECT MANAGEMENT 21
  22. 22. Execution Doing the work to deliver the product, service or wanted result. Most of the work related to the project is realized at this stage and needs complete attention from the project manager. The Objectives ⬜ Applicable Product or Process Life Cycle ⬜ Direct and Management Project Execution ⬜ The Deliverables Monitoring and Controlling Processes ▶ ☑ Preliminary Project Completion Review ☑ Schedule Work For Future Requirements PROJECT MANAGEMENT 22
  23. 23. Monitor & Control Once the project is running it is important the project manager keeps control. This is achieved by regular reporting of issues, risks, progress and the constant checking of the business case to ensure that expected benefits will be delivered and are still valid. A project that is not controlled is out of control. The Objectives ⬜ Monitoring and Controlling Processes ▶ The Deliverables ☑ Preliminary Project Completion Review PROJECT MANAGEMENT 23
  24. 24. Closure Often neglected, it is important to ensure a project is closed properly. Many projects never end because there is no formal sign-off. It is important to get the customers agreement that a project has ended and no more work will be carried out. Once closed, the project manager should review the project and record the good and bad points, so successes can be repeated and failures avoided. A project that is not closed will continue to consume resources. The Objectives ⬜ Stakeholder Review and Acceptance of Project The Deliverables ▶ ☑ Close Project ☑ Close Project Contracts PROJECT MANAGEMENT 24
  25. 25. PROJECT TOOLS PROJECT MANAGEMENT 25
  26. 26. Project Management Software PROJECT MANAGEMENT 26
  27. 27. OTHER PROJECT MANAGEMENT METHODLOGIES PROJECT MANAGEMENT 27
  28. 28. Waterfall Waterfall model is a sequential design process, often used in software development processes, in which progress is seen as flowing steadily downwards (like a waterfall) through the phases of Conception, Initiation, Analysis, Design, Construction, Testing, Production/Implementation, and Maintenance. Agile Agile project management is an iterative and incremental method of managing the design and build activities for engineering, information technology, and new product or service development projects in a highly flexible and interactive manner, for example agile software development. It requires capable individuals from the relevant business, with supplier and customer input. Critical Path Critical path calculates the longest path of planned activities to logical end points or to the end of the project, and the earliest and latest that each activity can start and finish without making the project longer. This process determines which activities are "critical" (i.e., on the longest path) and which have "total float" (i.e., can be delayed without making the project longer). In project management, a critical path is the sequence of project network activities which add up to the longest overall duration. PriSM PRISM is the sustainability based project delivery method which incorporates tangible tools and methods to manage the balance between finite resources, social responsibility, and delivering “green” project outcomes. It was developed for organizations to integrate project processes with sustainability initiatives to achieve business objectives while decreasing negative environmental impact. PRINCE2 PRINCE2 (Projects in Controlled Environments) is a project management methodology. It was developed by the UK government agency Office of Government Commerce (OGC) and is used extensively within the UK as the de facto project management standard for its public projects. The methodology encompasses the management, control and organization of a project. PROJECT MANAGEMENT 28
  29. 29. REFERENCES Project-Management.com 2014 http://www.project-management.com Project Management Institution 2014 http://www.pmi.org PlanAnything.com 2014 http://www.plananything.com Project Management Bibliography 2011 Authored by Safari Content Team Published by Safari Books Online CAPM/PMP Project Management Certification All-in-One Exam Guide 2014 Authored by Joseph Phillips Published by McGraw Hill Workplace Ecology: A Case Study in Project Management 2010 Authored by Robert E. Perrine Published by Smashwords Edition
  30. 30. Send me a message. 🔻🔻 @KrisKimmerle kris.kimmerle@outlook.com http://1drv.ms/1cgfZn0 http://www.linkedin.com/in/kriskimmerle

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