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Deploying the Voice of the Customer in the Development of a New Medical Device

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Using the Voice of the Customer to create new medical devices leads to mcuh better products for the customers. …

Using the Voice of the Customer to create new medical devices leads to mcuh better products for the customers.
I successfully used this methodology in the development of a complex new device (hemodialysis machine) for Baxter Healthcare.
This is the presentation from the Management Roundtable Conference in Boston, 2004


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  • Where the details meet the road. Program Director is an ideal person to accompany you on customer interviews and visits. West was great!
  • Transcript

    • 1. Deploying the Voice of the Customer Throughout the Product Development Process A Medical Device Success Story Development of a New Hemodialysis Machine A. Kristian Dekom Director Global Marketing Baxter Healthcare
    • 2. Hemodialysis Background
      • Kidney failure patients are treated 3 times/week
      • Blood is pumped extracorporeally, fluid removal and exchange with the patient
      • Computer driven, graphical user interface
      • Highly complex therapy, considerable risks
      • Over 1,000,000 patients worldwide
      • 4 major global competitors
    • 3. VOC Research Globally
      • Qualitative needs elicitation in customer language
        • 54 interviews to extract need
        • Entire relationship, not just product related needs
      • Needs prioritization and weighting
        • 158 participants
        • Importance ratings / weights
        • Evaluation of the performance of existing products in each need category
    • 4. USA 11 Interviews 29 Sorts Canada 12 Interviews 27 Sorts Germany 21 Interviews 28 Sorts France 10 Interviews 24 Sorts Italy 25 Sorts UK 25 Sorts Global VOC Research
    • 5. Diagram of Needs Hierarchy Strategic 5 Tactical 25 Detailed 110 Voice of the Customer Wants and Needs were organized into a hierarchical structure Strategic: Overarching set of customer needs used for defining strategic initiatives and for communicating VOC Tactical: Customer-defined categories of need used to focus on tactical initiatives related to product, service, and market planning Detailed: Detailed customer needs (in their own language) that provide definition to the Secondary Attributes
    • 6. VOC Findings
      • 5 strategic needs, 25 tactical needs, 110 detailed needs
        • Applicable to the physical product design: 3 strategic, 15 tactical, 66 detailed.
      • Key words from strategic and tactical needs
        • Safe, reliable, effective, easy, efficient
        • Key words used during design and reviews
      • VOC backed up by customer site visits, international shows, and in house cross-functional reviews
    • 7. Strategic Needs PROVIDE SAFE AND EFFECTIVE TREATMENT DEPENDABLE MACHINES THAT FIT INTO OUR CLINIC QUICK AND EASY TO SET UP, CLEAN, AND OPERATE GOOD, ATTENTIVE COMPANY PATIENT DATA
    • 8. PROVIDE SAFE AND EFFECTIVE TREATMENT No Failures or Emergencies During Treatment – the Patient Is Never in Danger 83 H Enables Caregiver to Efficiently Provide Personal Care to Patients 75 H Machines Provide the Most Efficient Treatment to Each Patient 71 H Alarms That Make Sense and Are Easy to Understand 71 H Able to Test Blood and Monitor the Effectiveness of the Treatment in Real-time 64 M DEPENDABLE MACHINES THAT FIT INTO OUR CLINIC Dependable Machines That Always Work 79 H Machines With a Proven Track Record 77 H Machines Are Easy to Move and Can Be Used Anywhere 48 L Machines Suit My Need Functionally 42 L Importance: Within Needs Structure QUICK AND EASY TO SETUP, CLEAN, AND OPERATE Machines Are Easy to Learn and to Operate – Interface Is Self-explanatory 73 H Both Users and Patients Are Protected From Contamination and Cross-infection 72 H Set-up for Each Patient Is Quick and Simple 65 M Quick, Easy, and Effective Disinfection 64 M Patient Is Comfortable During the Treatment 52 L Preparation of Chemicals for Machines Is Hassle-free 51 L GOOD, ATTENTIVE COMPANY Quick and Competent Service Technicians That Can Fix Problems Any Time Day or Night 70 H Machines Are Easy to Service and Maintain 69 H A Good Company That Provides Adequate Training and Is Interested in What We Have to Say 60 M Company and Reps That Care About Us and Understand Our Situation 59 M Fast Ordering and Delivery Process So We Get the Supplies We Need When We Need Them 58 M Machines Accommodate Wide Selection of High Quality Dialyzers and Tubing, and We Are Not Limited 56 L to a Single Manufacturer Affordable Machines, Equipment, and Maintenance Agreements With Flexible Financing Options 51 L PATIENT DATA Data is in the Format I Want 60 M Patient and Treatment Data is Easy to Enter 55 L Can Easily Access All Data 54 L
    • 9.  
    • 10. VOC Deployment in Design
    • 11. Project Scope
      • New instrument, combining two existing products and implementing enhancements
        • Post acquisition: unified product offering, reduce confusion
      + = ?
      • Fast time to market requirement
        • Less than 30 months
      • Not totally a ‘clean sheet’ design
        • Speed, integration were high priorities
        • Selective implementation of VOC findings
      • Focused on key customer requirements
    • 12. Project Scope Definition Concerns
      • Constraint: avoid perception that it was merely a new cover on an old instrument
        • Had to offer real improvements to both sets of current users, potential new buyers
      • Combining two product lines – which features to chose from each line? Which new ones to add?
        • Use VOC
    • 13. VOC: Industrial Design
      • “ An aesthetically pleasing machine (appealing color, bright screens, not intimidating)”
        • Key to the design
        • Not intimidating to the nurse or patient
        • “Homomorphic” design by industrial design firm (Ciclo PDC)
        • Arena - “Friendly by Design”
    • 14. Handles: “Easy to Move Around”
      • Which to select?
      • Both were larger, obvious (grab here!), aesthetically integrated, and well positioned
      • Design evaluation by users to decide
    • 15. Choosing Among Designs
    • 16. Choosing a Design
      • “ Can easily reach all external components (screen, bags, controls)”
      • Designs were tested with all bloodlines and setups
      • Nurses simulated setting up for treatment
      • Evaluations were captured from participants
    • 17. Choosing a Design
      • Both designs had good usability
      • More daring design won out
        • More “human”, more friendly
        • Homomorphic approach was validated by the evaluators
      • A strong statement in the marketplace
      The Competition
    • 18. Product Design Details
      • “ Can see with one glance what is going on with patient and machine”
        • Opportunity to use a BIG 15” display
          • Can be read much further away
          • Twice the area of nearest competitor
    • 19. User Interface
      • “ User friendly interface without navigating through multiple screens”
      • New user interface look
        • Higher contrast colors
        • Greater resolution
        • Ability to show more data on one screen
    • 20. Product Design Details
      • “ No inexplicable alarms”
      • Addition of pole mounted three color status light
        • Linked to alarms
    • 21. VOC Driven Feature Implementation
      • “ Don’t have to re-enter information”
        • Patient Data Card – insert card, verify data, prescription is loaded
      • “ Allows me to take care of more patients at once”
        • Patient controlled sodium bolus
    • 22. VOC Impact on Software
      • Can seamlessly integrate new machines into our current setting.”
        • Similarity of user interface to prior instruments
    • 23. Product Features
      • “ I am able to place objects on or write on machines (have flat surfaces)”
        • Top of machine is a lip-edged tray
        • Chart rack on back of display
        • Blood pressure cuff holder
        • Disinfect bottle holder
        • Waste buckets on either side of machine
    • 24. Using VOC to Help in Tradeoffs
      • Design issue: dialyzer holder on either side?
        • Suiting different functional needs (Importance: 42)
      • Bloodline setup could become much more confusing
        • Importance: 65
      • Significant cost & reliability impact
      • Cost & setup consistency outweigh advantage
    • 25. Trade-offs
      • Optional fold down integrated tray
      • Side space is often occupied by a bed or chair
      • Strength, reliability and cost
      • Top became tray
        • No incremental cost
    • 26. Information Display Trade-Offs
      • Good visibility was a key component of usability
      • Swivel mounted display option
        • Meets the requirement well
        • Significant cost penalty
        • Negative reliability impact
      • Wide angle display (160 o ) met the requirement without penalties
    • 27. Other Tradeoffs
      • DVD/CDROM inside
        • Engineers thought it was neat
        • Potentially useful for loading new software
        • Play movies, training videos, etcetera
      • No basis for it in VOC
        • Negative cost impact
      • Do you want a $25,000 DVD player or a $400 DVD player?
    • 28. VOC Driven Testing
      • “ Dependable machines that always work”
        • Simulated treatments Round 1
          • 30 instruments running continuously in the lab
          • 4100 treatment cycles
          • 25,000 hours
        • Round 2
          • 12 more instruments
          • 1000 more treatment cycles
          • 5,000 hours
        • Halt/Hass testing, environmental & shock/vibe testing
    • 29. VOC Driven Testing
      • “ Machines with a proven track record”
      • Testing in the field
        • 11 sites in 9 countries
        • 17 instruments
        • Over 1,400 treatments
        • 7,700+ hours
    • 30. Validation
    • 31. Market Research Findings Pre-Launch
      • Market research with 39 physicians, nurses & technicians
      • Excellent aesthetics
      • Perceived to be easy to use
        • Patient data card
        • Ergonomic design
        • Automatic disinfect, automatic start
      • Good use of technology to meet needs
        • Blood volume monitor
        • Sodium bolus button
        • Blood pressure monitor
      • Excellent likelihood to recommend
    • 32. Results
    • 33. Successful Launches
      • Delirium in Berlin
      • Crowds in San Diego
    • 34. Results
      • Balanced global sales
        • European sales have risen as a fraction of the total
      • Consistent image, consistent product
        • One product to sell to all customers worldwide
    • 35. Key Learnings
    • 36. Key Learnings
      • Research, Research, Research
        • Data vs. Intuition, Seat of the Pants
        • Data > Intuition
      • VOC information facilitated design selection and design choices
      • VOC successfully drove the test regimen
      • Real quotes were vital
        • Made the meaning clear
        • Made the need real, not an abstract analysis
        • Personal impact
    • 37. Key Learnings
      • VOC research has applicability well beyond new product development
        • Data used for strategy analysis
      • Quantitative VOC data can be a powerful persuasion tool:
        • “ The data says…”
        • versus
        • “ I think…”